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Discussion Starter #1
I think this is something yet to be addressed, but does anyone know if the MS6 engine will support ethanol fuel? I would think that it wouldn't, but I'm just curious to know.
 

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actually this has been addressed...quick search will do it for ya.

the speed6 is the same as any other car...the fuel lines will rot out from the ethanol. a car has to be ready for ethanol or seriously retrofitted
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The only reason I asked is because of the recent political shift in government. Expect the majority of gas stations to be carrying ethanol in before 2010.
 

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The only reason I asked is because of the recent political shift in government. [/b]
Don't worry, I'm no longer on suicidal watch because of it... :banghead:
 

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Don't worry, I'm no longer on suicidal watch because of it... :banghead:
[/b]


retrofitting isnt the hardest...most of it just involves replacing rubber lines and seals with stainless ones. but, i am of the camp believing that ethanol is sort of a false prophecy. i say this despite my future wife's inheriting a 1000 acre corn farm, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
retrofitting isnt the hardest...most of it just involves replacing rubber lines and seals with stainless ones. but, i am of the camp believing that ethanol is sort of a false prophecy. i say this despite my future wife's inheriting a 1000 acre corn farm, lol.
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There are already a few vehicles that run on it and some gas stations that sell it. Right now it's not any cheaper to buy than unleaded gasoline, but it will be after some time. So as far as a false prophecy, it's far from that. The facts are the facts: oil is a depleatable natural resource, starchy crops are not.
 

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There are already a few vehicles that run on it and some gas stations that sell it. Right now it's not any cheaper to buy than unleaded gasoline, but it will be after some time. So as far as a false prophecy, it's far from that. The facts are the facts: oil is a depleatable natural resource, starchy crops are not.
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Talk to me when it can make it on its own without all the subsidies it is getting right now. Until then....

Current tech for corn ethanol is not very efficient - not doing much better than a slight yield (energy output as ethanol - inputs from petroleum [tractors, fertilizer, etc]). Sugar does much better (Brazil), but much of US is much better suited to corn growth. When they get better with using corn and plant waste, we might get somewhere with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Talk to me when it can make it on its own without all the subsidies it is getting right now. Until then....

Current tech for corn ethanol is not very efficient - not doing much better than a slight yield (energy output as ethanol - inputs from petroleum [tractors, fertilizer, etc]). Sugar does much better (Brazil), but much of US is much better suited to corn growth. When they get better with using corn and plant waste, we might get somewhere with it.
[/b]
If it were up to me, and I am no tree hugger, I would go with the chinese invention of garbage refuse.
 

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i am of the camp believing that ethanol is sort of a false prophecy. i say this despite my future wife's inheriting a 1000 acre corn farm[/b]

The ethanol push is just another federal farm subsidy.

This, along with the BioDiesel folks hailing the "reduced dependence on foreign oil" even though the palm oil used to create the fuel is imported from Malaysia.
 

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I guess there is always a rub...someday we'll find something that's as good as free, buried dinosaurs, lol
 

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Dont forget all the diesel thats burned in the growing of the crops, and last I checked farm vehicles, at least in Canada, dont have the same smog regulations as those being driven on the road. So is it really any better?

The other counter argument would be that vehicles running on more refined higher octane fuels can be made to be more effiecent. Look at propane, you have to burn almost twice as much of the stuff for every km or mile you drive.
 

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Not really. The problem with some of these other fuels is a lower energy content than gasoline.

That is one of the issues with hydrogen. Obviously since the molecule is smaller and less complex, it has less high energy bonds within its structure to store more energy. Whereas gasoline is fairly complex and holds a lot of energy.

So if the fuel you are burning produces less energy, you will have to burn more of it to do the same amount of work.
 

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I'm planning on retrofitting my Speed 6 with a Mr Fusion. A couple cardboard boxes, banana peel, and an empty beer can will totally put me into the 9's.
 

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I'm planning on retrofitting my Speed 6 with a Mr Fusion. A couple cardboard boxes, banana peel, and an empty beer can will totally put me into the 9's.
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Yeah, but once you hit 88 MPH, who knows where you'll end up. :p

 

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Yeah, but once you hit 88 MPH, who knows where you'll end up. :p



[/b]
guess you'll only be able ro run 1/8 mile track then :p
 

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The ethanol push is just another federal farm subsidy.

This, along with the BioDiesel folks hailing the "reduced dependence on foreign oil" even though the palm oil used to create the fuel is imported from Malaysia. [/b]

One really big problem with E85 ethanol is its poorer efficency. It simply produces less power than straight gasoline. Fuel mileage will suffer greatly, and unless the E85 is substantialy cheaper than regular gasoline there really won't be any savings. Add to that the cost of retrofitting an existing vehicle to use E85 and it becomes a more expensive way to go.
The process of making ethanol from corn is also not very efficient, the energy consumed to refine the corn also eats into the amount of real conservation obtained.
Finally, there are serious doubts that there could ever be enough farm production to meet the demand if E85 is ever accepted widely.
I'm all for looking for a better way than being so completely dependent on foreign oil and what is a finite supply of fossil fuel, but I don't think E85 is the answer
 
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