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Was recently changing my oil and as I was finishing up jacking up the car to take out the Jack stands, the side frame (?) seemed to bend some. I jacked up what I thought was the pinch point and have worked on the car several times with no issues. I took it for a quick drive and I think it seems normal, but I can’t give it an honest assessment. Anyone know the exact risk of something like this? Last picture is the other non-bent side for reference.
 

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As mentioned earlier, you might have mistaken the position of the "pinch weld".

It should be where my finger is pointing.



Aside from that, I use this "rubber protector". I don't know what is it called, but it fits the jack stand and supports the pinch weld.

 

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As mentioned earlier, you might have mistaken the position of the "pinch weld".

It should be where my finger is pointing.



Aside from that, I use this "rubber protector". I don't know what is it called, but it fits the jack stand and supports the pinch weld.

Archerfish, yes, conventional wisdom says NOT to jack on those "pinch-weld" seams, as they constitute a "knife-edge", and they could easily be bent away from plumb. That's what your rubber blocks seek to prevent. And I, too, have a set of rubber-faced wooden blocks with a sawn slot in each block to "miss" the pinch-weld seam...

However, I can't use them on my Mazda6. Mazda6's have what Mazda calls a "sill moulding, i.e. essentially a plastic moulding that is affixed to the rocker panel, and which theoretically serves to protect the rockers from rock chips... If I use my blocks, then the car's weight is taken NOT by the pinch-weld seam (on-edge) but by a combination of a squished, compressed, cracked sill moulding, and a squished, compressed, cracked under-car aero panel.

Neither alternative is acceptable to me. Instead I do the following:

The pinch-weld seam comprises three (3) thicknesses of sheet metal, and one of the three gauges of sheet metal is ultra thick. Also, a portion of this pinch-weld seam has the most-outboard sheet metal folded over top of the seam, i.e. folded inboard. I judge these parts of the pinch-weld seam as being very strong and NOT susceptible to damage due to lifting the car. They are near-to or part of the cars' jacking points. Accordingly, I have fir blocks (Douglas Fir, wood) blocks, and I support the car at those folded over locations with these wooden blocks and my jackstands. I could improve the safety by taking the barest skiff of a saw cut down the centre of each block, maybe the width of two saw blade kerfs. The wood "gives" a little, and does not break the paint.

That's my solution. I lift on the pinch-weld seams at those locations.

Oh one more thing... If you are using deep V's or slots on your rubber jack pads, and if said jackpads contact the actual rockerpanel (ultra-thin) sheet metal... I'd bet you'd bend or crease said sheet metal easily. It's really, really thin-gauge. Stay away from it!

Others: YMMV...
 

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Oh one more thing... If you are using deep V's or slots on your rubber jack pads, and if said jackpads contact the actual rockerpanel (ultra-thin) sheet metal... I'd bet you'd bend or crease said sheet metal easily. It's really, really thin-gauge. Stay away from it!

Others: YMMV...
I remember checking it but I decided to double check if I got it right.





The scissor jack has the almost the same depth with the rubber block, a difference of about 1 mm.

And with that, I think I can safely conclude that the rubber block is safe to use.

Now that I mentioned the scissor lift, I bought an adapter so that I can easily use a ratchet or my wireless impact wrench.

 

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I remember checking it but I decided to double check if I got it right.





The scissor jack has the almost the same depth with the rubber block, a difference of about 1 mm.

And with that, I think I can safely conclude that the rubber block is safe to use.

Now that I mentioned the scissor lift, I bought an adapter so that I can easily use a ratchet or my wireless impact wrench.

Strange as it seems, I concluded that the OEM Mazda scissor jack ALSO causes this damage to the sill moulding, but especially to the aero under-panel. The aero under-panel, especially at the rear jacking points, is sandwiched between the OEM jack top/jack head and the underchassis surface. It seems to me that that brittle plastic would be crushed.

Have a look...

Thx.

BTW... cool to have found a hex adapter. I didn't know those existed... 🙂.
 

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I just want to verify if someone has used the front part to jack up the car.





When I lifted the car, I used two scissor jacks. Then after putting the jack stands, I removed the jacks and transferred it to lift the rear.

I'm about to buy and try this low profile jack I saw.
 

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Seems to me that the car has to be on at least shallow-height ramps first, or as Archerfish says - two scissor jacks... to be able to reach the frt cross member point. Same re the rear... but note that the rear central jacking point has an error in the dwg. The rear central jacking point is not at the centreline of the car, but rather is slightly to the left of centre... See attached...
 

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Now is a great time for me to brag about the QuickJack I bought last year.
I was trying to figure out how to get one when they were on sale for $300 off :(
 
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