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well i'm going to be purchasing a set of gunmetal rims...17x7 with an offset of 42mm...i'm fairly new to rims and tires and i need some advice on a set of rubbers(tires)....i live in sourthern cali so snow isn't an issue...any help or advice would be appreciated.. :)
 

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well i'm going to be purchasing a set of gunmetal rims...17x7 with an offset of 42mm...i'm fairly new to rims and tires and i need some advice on a set of rubbers(tires)....i live in sourthern cali so snow isn't an issue...any help or advice would be appreciated.. :)
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That offset is minus 18mm from the OEMs. What that means is you have extra clearance from the front suspension arms, and significantly reduced clearance from the rear fenders. Even if you were using the OEM tires, you might have problems at the rear unless you roll the rear fenders.

As it happens, using OEM rims (not the minus 18mm you are going to use), I purchased two pairs (quite intentionally different) tires all at once last month, and the choice that I made also may address your potential rubbing issue. I purchased Yokohama ADVAN Sport 205/55R17 tires for the rear and Goodyear Eagle GS-D3 225/50R17 tires for the front. The overall diameter of each of the four tires is identical, but the rears are slightly narrower than the front; that is, the configuration is a "reverse staggered" orientation. (The measuring rim for the Yokohama ADVAN Sport 205/55 is 6.5", so, mounted on a 7.0" rim, the actual section width of the rear tires is actually over 210mm; the actual contact patch of all four tires is the same as long as the air pressure of all four tires is the same.) The slight narrowness in the rear helps (but only in part) the possible rubbing issues you will have using 42mm offset rims.

The Goodyear Eagle GS-D3 has a higher treadwear rating than the Yokohama ADVAN Sport, 280 to 180. However, as Mazda6's have a strong front weight bias, most tire wear occurs at the front, and the front Goodyears likely will wear out faster than the rear Yokohamas.

Mazda6's are prone to understeer, and the "reverse staggered" arrangement described here slightly counters the understeer -- not a huge amount, but a change in the right direction. I intend to start a new thread to discuss this aspect sometime when I get a Round Tuit, but I give you a preview here.
 

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wheels.

Michelin Pilot Sport PS2 ftw I like them much more than polepositions

does anyone know why lots of Mazda 6 owners tend to go cheap on the wheels/tires. They're fairly nice cars, but i see alot of motegi/sears racing/etc. i haven't seen any iForged, HRE, kinesis, bbs, etc.
 

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Toyo proxes 4 ftw! Great look, great traction, great tread wear, its a trifecta! :love:
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The Proxes4 is an all season tire, the design of which compromises wet braking as the price to give it snow traction. The original poster is in Oceanside, California. He needs snow traction like a fish needs a bicycle. One cannot deny that the Proxes4 does look good standing still, though.
 

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The Proxes4 is an all season tire, the design of which compromises wet braking as the price to give it snow traction. [/b]
No, it doesn't. Do we really have to go through this b.s. again? :zzz:
 

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Toyo Proxes 4 FTW +2 :)



does anyone know why lots of Mazda 6 owners tend to go cheap on the wheels/tires. They're fairly nice cars, but i see alot of motegi/sears racing/etc. i haven't seen any iForged, HRE, kinesis, bbs, etc.
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whats wrong with Motegi's :huh:

i didnt think spending $1,500 on wheels and tires was cheap, guess i was wrong... you must be loaded :D
 

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how's tread life....i'm looking to proabably jump on the 215/50/R17's for the stock rims, as i dont want a bigger wheel gap with the 225/45's...

basically will i get 30+k miles outa the proxes???
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Well, a lot is going to depend on your driving style, the road conditions where you live, the condition of your suspension (ie alignment, are you lowered, condition of bushings, etc). But as an average, 30k miles is a reasonable expectation for the Proxes4. If your car is in good condition, etc you could get more, if not, you could get less. How's that for vague? :D
 

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Well, a lot is going to depend on your driving style, the road conditions where you live, the condition of your suspension (ie alignment, are you lowered, condition of bushings, etc). But as an average, 30k miles is a reasonable expectation for the Proxes4. If your car is in good condition, etc you could get more, if not, you could get less. How's that for vague? :D
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sorry didnt really think about those different factors. I only abuse my tires i'd say once or twice a month a few hard exit/on ramps. suspension is completey stock. I currently have about 38k miles on the stock tires, they seem to have a decent amount of grip on them left i could get about 10k more, but i'm not willing to risk it with two bulges on my rear tires. You know the deal with the stock tires, they look like they have alot of tread, but in reality a little water and its hydroing all over the place....

drive on pretty crappy nj roads, and i tag up about 5-6 hundred miles a week. I'm not sure if treadwear will last the 30k miles, or if i'm better going with something "cooer" like Falken :p thanks for the quick responce, as thats going to be my christmas present from the parental unit.
 

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I'm not sure if treadwear will last the 30k miles, or if i'm better going with something "cooer" like Falken :p [/b]
I'm trying to play it on the conservative side, but in all likelihood, you'll be pleased with the mileage of the Proxes4.
 

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I'm pretty partial to Falken tires. For tires that are made in Japan they are as cheap as many brands made in Korea, Mexico, Taiwan.
 

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No, it doesn't. Do we really have to go through this b.s. again? :zzz:
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Yes it does. An all season tire has to give up wet braking, because it is designed specifically so that water will adhere to the tread. Water makes a pretty fair lubricant between the tread and the surface of the road. If you want a tire to brake well on wet pavement, you design it to shed water from the tread -- but then the tire will have poor snow traction because it will not adhere to snow. Here is recent confirmation from another source.

We really should not have to have this discussion all over again, and it is not b.s.; it is simple physics that the less water there is between the tread and the pavement, the more intimate the tire's contact with the pavement, and the better the coefficient of friction, will be. The physics does not change; only the advertising copy changes.
 

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OL seriously i'm tired of you guys fighting it out.....i'll sum it up.

basically DONT TAILGATE! lol j/k

if you live where you get snow, you should have a designated snow tires, and designated summer tires.

if you live where this is NO snow, knock yourself out with a good pair of high performance summer tires.

for those of you that can't afford snow tires/summer tires like me a all season tire is the way to go. granted you will give up some performance in a sense but hey....you can't get two birds with one stone right? Basically a good all year round tire designed to see hot days, torrential downpour, and a little bit of snow, all season is a good way to go.

me unfortunately i'll have to deal with a pair of all seasons till these new toyo's get bald, then i'll get two pairs, one for winter, and one for summer.
 

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Yes it does. An all season tire has to give up wet braking, because it is designed specifically so that water will adhere to the tread. Water makes a pretty fair lubricant between the tread and the surface of the road. If you want a tire to brake well on wet pavement, you design it to shed water from the tread -- but then the tire will have poor snow traction because it will not adhere to snow. Here is recent confirmation from another source.

We really should not have to have this discussion all over again, and it is not b.s.; it is simple physics that the less water there is between the tread and the pavement, the more intimate the tire's contact with the pavement, and the better the coefficient of friction, will be. The physics does not change; only the advertising copy changes.
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ummm how can you argue with a guy who personally knows that tire backwards and frontwards, inside and out.... this is what he does....he IS Toyo Guy after all... and you are??
 

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ummm how can you argue with a guy who personally knows that tire backwards and frontwards, inside and out.... this is what he does....he IS Toyo Guy after all... and you are??
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I do not work for a tire company at the present time. I also prefer to argue from the facts, not on the basis of who I am. But, as you asked, we have determined in exchanges in prior threads that I have about twice as many years' experience in the tire industry as ToyoGuy does. ToyoGuy knows a lot of stuff. I agree with hm on 99 percent of what he posts here. But on the subject of all season tires, he simply restates the Madison Avenue ad copy and refuses to acknowledge the laws of physics.
 

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ummm how can you argue with a guy who personally knows that tire backwards and frontwards, inside and out.... this is what he does....he IS Toyo Guy after all... and you are??
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:slap: :slap: :slap:
dont instigate him!!! oh my god....this thread is going to get crazy again, we dont need another dog fight between the two...
 
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