Mazda 6 Forums banner

421 - 440 of 564 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Mine came stock with the Bridgestone Potenza RE050A, 215/45-18, treadware rating 140 ..... they didn't make it to 15K.

Being unemployed at the time, I decided to be practical and go to the complete opposite end of the treadware spectrum and had Discount Tire put on a set of Kumho Ecsta LX Platinum, 225/40-18, treadware rating 600 ..... haven't had them long enough to extrapolate how long they'll last, but I was immediately struck by how unbelievably quiet the Kumhos are at "normal" highway speeds of 70-80 MPH, and it wasn't as though the Bridgestones had been particularly noisy.

I'm sure these Kumhos wouldn't meet many people's performance standards (i.e., not soft enough), but I've been happy with them so far and, if the treadware ratings are accurate and indicative of the driving I do, then I probably won't have to buy a new set for another 50-60K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
I bought it used with Continental ContiExtremeContact All-Season, 215/50-17, they're decent tires. I cant complain considering that here in Chicago the Winter sucked, now spring sucks...hopefully summer will be better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just got a used 2004 6s and there's a mix of Yokes and Michelins on the car. In looking at the repair records, it looks like the tires were replaced at least twice, and there's 79k miles on the car. Never having owned a Mazda, and at least 30 years removed from driving a fwd car, it sounds like the 6 either chews up tires, or the previous owner was doing something wrong. Any thoughts/suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
QUOTE (tomsoni62 @ Apr 18 2009, 06:48 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1549332
I just got a used 2004 6s and there's a mix of Yokes and Michelins on the car. In looking at the repair records, it looks like the tires were replaced at least twice, and there's 79k miles on the car. Never having owned a Mazda, and at least 30 years removed from driving a fwd car, it sounds like the 6 either chews up tires, or the previous owner was doing something wrong. Any thoughts/suggestions?[/b]
Any FWD car will cause wear of the front tires at least twice as fast as it causes wear on the rears. Some Mazda6's have caster/camber/toe-in such that the outside edges of the front tires wear out even faster; some don't; but if you do not rotate your tires frequently, your fronts will wear much faster than your rears.

There are two schools of thought about how to live within those parameters. One school says that you rotate your tires frequently to keep the wear even. The other school says just let your fronts wear down to the indicator bars, then move the rear tires to the front and put a pair of new tires on the rear. (There is a third school that says always put new tires in front; that school is wrong, but it gets repeated a lot, anyway.) I subscribe to the wear-out-front, replace-rears school.

For safety, you always want to have the pair of tires at the rear to have: (a) the better dry grip -- usually inversely proportional to the Treadwear number on the sidewall, and (b) the deeper grooves/channels for water evacuation. This can cause a dilemma when the less-worn tires (deeper grooves) have the higher Treadwear rating (less grip). In that case, I usually recommend putting the tires with the better dry grip at the rear, on the theory that in most cases, the front tires will have "wiped" the pavement mostly dry fractions of a second before the rear tires reach the same spot of pavement.

The reason you want more grip at the rear is the same reason that most bicycles are set up so that the right -- in most people the stronger hand -- handbrake stops the rear wheel and the left (weaker) handbrake stops the front wheel. If you grip hard on only the front wheel brake of a bicycle, the front digs in and the rear is likely to rotate right over the top and throw the rider. If the front wheels of a car dig in while the rear wheels lack sufficient traction to bite, the rear end of the car is likely to come around in front of the stationary front wheels.

The final consideration in this calculation is mixing all-season and non-all-season tires. Generally, all-season tires have 20 to 40 percent less friction (stopping power) on wet pavement than non-all-season tires do, due to the chemical alterations to the tread compound of all-season tires to lessen their tendency to shed water: that means that they ride on a film of water whenever the pavement is wet. You need to take that into account, then, in deciding which tires to put at the front and which to put at the rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I currently have Cooper Zeon ZPT in the factory 18" size. When I replace them, I will probably do so with Yokohama Avid v4s' in 225/40/18.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
898 Posts
Took off the 215/55R16 Toyo CT01's on the Crown Victoria knockoffs on Sunday and mounted the 215/50R17 Hankook Ventus K104's that have been sitting in the attic on OE Crown Victoria rims, and drove off to Riyadh. I could hardly bear the noise on the way, and the combo weighs a ton. So on Monday I took off those, then stripped the 16 Chinese knockoffs that used to live under my Miata for the past few months off of the dreadful 225/50R16 Potenza 050 runflats, bought a brand new set of 215/55R16 SP Sport Maxx's, and drove back to Jeddah. Now I'm wondering why I'm even putting up with the Miata :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
The Pilot HX MXM4s are gone. Can't see paying those eye gouging prices so I'm going with the Falken ZE912s over the Sumitomo HTR ZIII. Its the same damn tire by Sumitomo(says it right on the Falken) and its cheaper. Same performance for summer driving. Besides its always summer where in paradise.

Falken 912


ZIII
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
QUOTE (Lavaboy @ Apr 30 2009, 05:44 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1555012
The Pilot HX MXM4s are gone. Can't see paying those eye gouging prices[/b]
The price the consumer pays for a replacement Pilot HX MXM4 is many tmes the price that Mazda pays for the tires it fits as OEM on the cars. Part of the pricing model of tire manufacturers is to sell tires to car makers as OEM fitment at cost or even below, on the theory that many car owners will blindly replace the tires when worn with the identical model. The tire maker then recoups from the replacement market the margin of profit that it discounted to the car maker. "Eye gouging" is one way to describe that practice.

QUOTE (Lavaboy @ Apr 30 2009, 05:44 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1555012
I'm going with the Falken ZE912s over the Sumitomo HTR ZIII. Its the same damn tire by Sumitomo(says it right on the Falken) and its cheaper. Same performance for summer driving. Besides its always summer where in paradise.[/b]
Your screen name is Lavaboy and you write of "paradise"; may we infer from that screen name and comment that most of your driving is in Hawaii? It rains there, right? Does not snow a lot, I suspect. You really have no need for light snow capability in that case, and need not live with the compromises it imposes. See this post (click). The all-season ZE912 and the non-all-season HTRZIII are not the same tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
2007 MazdaSpeed6 GT

Dunlop Direzza Sport Z1 Star Spec 225/45ZR18 for spring,summer,fall.

Blizzak LM-25 225/45R18 snows for winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Replaced the OEM Michelin's recently. I actually didn't mind the tires although I thought the wet traction could have been better and they were reaching the end of their life. They rode nice and were quiet and handled decent. I don't drive my car very hard and I do a lot of highway right now so a high performance summer tire wasn't what I need. If they were the original ones then they lasted 45k. Too pricey though as many have mentioned.

I went with Bridgestone Turanza's with the new serenity technology. We'll see how that works out. So far they are great to drive on and have better wet and dry traction than the Michelins. $180 apiece installed, with a $100 bridgestone rebate on top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
QUOTE (posttosh @ Apr 18 2009, 10:28 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1549341
Any FWD car will cause wear of the front tires at least twice as fast as it causes wear on the rears. Some Mazda6's have caster/camber/toe-in such that the outside edges of the front tires wear out even faster; some don't; but if you do not rotate your tires frequently, your fronts will wear much faster than your rears.

There are two schools of thought about how to live within those parameters. One school says that you rotate your tires frequently to keep the wear even. The other school says just let your fronts wear down to the indicator bars, then move the rear tires to the front and put a pair of new tires on the rear. (There is a third school that says always put new tires in front; that school is wrong, but it gets repeated a lot, anyway.) I subscribe to the wear-out-front, replace-rears school.

For safety, you always want to have the pair of tires at the rear to have: (a) the better dry grip -- usually inversely proportional to the Treadwear number on the sidewall, and (b) the deeper grooves/channels for water evacuation. This can cause a dilemma when the less-worn tires (deeper grooves) have the higher Treadwear rating (less grip). In that case, I usually recommend putting the tires with the better dry grip at the rear, on the theory that in most cases, the front tires will have "wiped" the pavement mostly dry fractions of a second before the rear tires reach the same spot of pavement.

The reason you want more grip at the rear is the same reason that most bicycles are set up so that the right -- in most people the stronger hand -- handbrake stops the rear wheel and the left (weaker) handbrake stops the front wheel. If you grip hard on only the front wheel brake of a bicycle, the front digs in and the rear is likely to rotate right over the top and throw the rider. If the front wheels of a car dig in while the rear wheels lack sufficient traction to bite, the rear end of the car is likely to come around in front of the stationary front wheels.

The final consideration in this calculation is mixing all-season and non-all-season tires. Generally, all-season tires have 20 to 40 percent less friction (stopping power) on wet pavement than non-all-season tires do, due to the chemical alterations to the tread compound of all-season tires to lessen their tendency to shed water: that means that they ride on a film of water whenever the pavement is wet. You need to take that into account, then, in deciding which tires to put at the front and which to put at the rear.[/b]

Thanks. Helpful information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
QUOTE (posttosh @ May 1 2009, 08:02 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1555325
The price the consumer pays for a replacement Pilot HX MXM4 is many tmes the price that Mazda pays for the tires it fits as OEM on the cars. Part of the pricing model of tire manufacturers is to sell tires to car makers as OEM fitment at cost or even below, on the theory that many car owners will blindly replace the tires when worn with the identical model. The tire maker then recoups from the replacement market the margin of profit that it discounted to the car maker. "Eye gouging" is one way to describe that practice.

Your screen name is Lavaboy and you write of "paradise"; may we infer from that screen name and comment that most of your driving is in Hawaii? It rains there, right? Does not snow a lot, I suspect. You really have no need for light snow capability in that case, and need not live with the compromises it imposes. See this post (click). The all-season ZE912 and the non-all-season HTRZIII are not the same tire.[/b]
Well so far I'm experiencing these tires. Lots of rain here and good mix with dry conditions. So far these tires are holding well. They are little stiffer like you said but road noise is very little compare to the eroding HX. For the price I'm getting my moneys worth. We have alot of cars on the roads here so perfromance driving is at a minimum. Plus all the alcohol related accidents and deaths recently theres speed traps all over the place. I really wanted the zIIIs but budget was the issue. Thanks for the advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
QUOTE (posttosh @ Apr 18 2009, 10:28 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1549341
There are two schools of thought about how to live within those parameters. One school says that you rotate your tires frequently to keep the wear even. The other school says just let your fronts wear down to the indicator bars, then move the rear tires to the front and put a pair of new tires on the rear. (There is a third school that says always put new tires in front; that school is wrong, but it gets repeated a lot, anyway.) I subscribe to the wear-out-front, replace-rears school.[/b]
If you are driving the AWD Speed6 you never want to follow the 2nd or 3rd school of thought. This particular car must have all tires the same size and within about 2/16ths of wear. Other wise you are really overworking the transfer case that sends power to the rear wheels. The sensors in the car read the difference in tire size as slippage, and try to constantly compensate. This car normally drives mostly as if FWD, transferring little torque to the rear unless it senses the need. With hard acceleration, or slippage up to a maximum of 50% of torque is transferred to the rear. You must maintain equal make, size and wear for the tires on this car. Or you will be replacing the transfer case, it gets mighty hot. (change fluid one a year at least). This is not the case with Speed3 at its FWD.
Differential size tires on this car also can cause the DSC stability control to be activated as it sees the size difference as slippage and will apply brakes and retard throttle as it deems appropriate. The car is designed for equal rates of rotation at each corner.
And yes if you need to replace one tire, you either need to have it shaved to match the others or buy four new ones. You has to pay to play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
QUOTE (LaserTagPro @ Feb 17 2009, 04:17 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=1520963
The Pirelli PZero Nero tires in size 215/45-18 came stock on my 6s and I liked them so much I bought the same when they were worn out. A compromise between grip and longevity that suits me just fine. :love:[/b]


I have a MS6 and when I was searching for tires after I obliterated the Potenzas, I found these. I have had them a just over a year and love them. Good price range and grip the road well. Can be a little rough at first in the cold but once the warm up, look out.

The cool thing that I liked is that they are built with the 6 in mind.


and they gots a really cool calendar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Alright guys I made it over here to Germany and was informed that during winter here is more icy than snowy... I've got stock 18's (mazda 6S) and in need of probably a good all season tire. They do checks here on base when it gets to that time when ice become a problem and then give you a 70 (euro) fine and then revoke your driving privileges until the discrepancy is fixed. So for those people who live in the icy winter states what are your opinions? I am originally from southern California so I am not used to this all season tire stuff. Any advice would be great...
 
421 - 440 of 564 Posts
Top