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Discussion Starter #1
The reason I'm asking is because when I installed my new coilovers I forgot to put this back on on the front driver side hub. Not sure if it serves any purpose.
IMG_8267 2.jpg
 

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On the 1st page of my build thread (link in signature) I posted a picture and circled this wondering what it was. I originally thought it was the sensor for the tire pressure monitor but I soon found out it is mounted in the tire.

Never did find out what it's for but it's supposed to be there.
 

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Is there a wire going to it? If not, whatever it is, is passive. I can't tell from photo if it's a plastic housing or a block of rubber. If it's a block of rubber I wonder if it's nothing more than a wheel/tire stop to stop the tire from flopping too far in when taking off lug nuts. Just a stab in the dark...
 

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According to the workshop manual, that's the "Dynamic Damper" but I can't seem to find a part number for it, only for the 2nd gen.
238681
 

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If there's a place to reattach it I would, especially if it's rubber -- it's there to change the resonant frequency of the assembly enough that it doesn't annoy the blankety-blank out of you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Um, is there a spot for it on the coil overs? It does look useless.
There is a spot (so I most likely will put it back on), but the whole assembly seemed fine without it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Is there a wire going to it? If not, whatever it is, is passive. I can't tell from photo if it's a plastic housing or a block of rubber. If it's a block of rubber I wonder if it's nothing more than a wheel/tire stop to stop the tire from flopping too far in when taking off lug nuts. Just a stab in the dark...
No wiring involved with it and it is a block of rubber. Your guess is as good as mine, I really have no clue what this is.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
According to the workshop manual, that's the "Dynamic Damper" but I can't seem to find a part number for it, only for the 2nd gen. View attachment 238681
Interesting, so how vital do you think this part is to the whole assembly? I'll be putting it back on, but I definitely drove around a bit without it so curiosity is definitely leading me to believe it's not an essential part.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If there's a place to reattach it I would, especially if it's rubber -- it's there to change the resonant frequency of the assembly enough that it doesn't annoy the blankety-blank out of you.
It is indeed rubber, will be going back on soon!
 

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The rubber/metal piece you point out is a dynamic damper. They are often on motor mounts, struts, CV shafts, exhaust and really any part that involves, or is connected to, a rotating part.

Here is a paper on the effect of dampers on CV shafts I read a few years ago. The part is different but it serves a similar dynamic function.
I always put them back on when I can.
 

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If it was positioned in different direction, it could be a bumper used cushion the steering system during lock to lock turns. In this case someone else nailed it, it as vibration damper. It's not a critical part but instead part of a system to tame vibrations in the car, any car. You will also find these on your exhaust system hangers. Some copy pasted info follows.
Noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH), also known as noise and vibration (N&V), is the study and modification of the noise and vibration characteristics of vehicles, particularly cars and trucks. While noise and vibration can be readily measured, harshness is a subjective quality. Interior NVH deals with noise and vibration experienced by the occupants of the cabin, while exterior NVH is largely concerned with the noise radiated by the vehicle, and includes drive-by noise testing. Balance shafts are most common in inline four cylinder engines which, due to the asymmetry of their design, have an inherent second order vibration (vibrating at twice the engine RPM) which cannot be eliminated no matter how well the internal components are balanced. A great deal of engineering has gone into engine mounts through the decades because they are critical in isolating engine vibration from getting into the cabin. It all adds up so don't throw away parts the factory spent a great deal on money engineering to make your ride more enjoyable.
I worked on cars going back to the late 1950's and loved it--well not always. I never was an auto mechanic by trade, learned everything by doing lots of reading and the dirty hands hard way. Airline aircraft maintenance was my trade.
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