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I am currently considering the purchase of a used Mazda6 Touring and came here for the intentions of researching the car.

I can attest to the longevity and quality of German OEM brakes as I am coming from owning both an Audi A4 and VW Jetta GLI (current). Up until recently, all of my pads and rotors were factory on the GLI. The fronts are still on the car and I just replaced the rears a few months back. The car currently sits at just shy of 119,000 miles. Since new the car has stopped on a dime and I've never had the slightest hint of uneven wear or buildup, and I am hard on a car. I had concerns about the brakes being on the car for so long and the dealer service checks were always marked as not needing to be replaced, so I brought it up with my service adviser. He said that he has plenty of cars still on the OEM pads and rotors and it's just not something they have to worry about much. I was amazed as every other car I've owned needed brakes replaced much more frequently. I'm about to trade in my car with the factory installed brakes still on the front wheels. It says a lot about the materials used.
Not just German, but European brake pads in general are great stuff.

Cant go wrong with the Mazda 6, they've really sorted things out and improved tremendously with quality and reliability over previous models. I am exceedingly happy with mine.
 

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2004 Mazda 6s Wagon ATX
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I just want to comment on the rarity of actually warping the rotors. The only time I have had to fixed truly warped rotors was when another member of my family drove to work (hwy driving) with the parking brake on in the rain. puddle splash on red hot rear rotors did the trick.
Generally what people call warped is an uneven buildup of pad material that results from pad deposition after heating when the rotor surface has not been appropriately prepared. The softened pad then remains in contact with a single place on the rotor after stopping and cools slightly depositing a "pad imprint" on the rotor. The imprint then builds up over time as the surface is not completely smooth any longer.
I will link the bedding procedure below.
Millennial or younger (video link)
Generation X and older (text link)
 

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Nope -- it's not specific to where you live. With VWs it's just their design life and bias between front and rears and has nothing at all to do with the parking brake mechanism. There's an improved pad design available that is materially longer-lasting but you lose some rear-wheel braking bite with it and frankly, I like the balance of the OE setup better so changing out rear pads at ~40k intervals doesn't upset me all that much considering that they're cheap on that car (you can do brakes on those cars for ~$100/axle in parts including the rotors; if you just want to buy pads we're talking $25-30 or so for OE-quality stuff.)
 

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2004 Mazda 6s Wagon ATX
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Nope -- it's not specific to where you live. With VWs it's just their design life and bias between front and rears and has nothing at all to do with the parking brake mechanism. There's an improved pad design available that is materially longer-lasting but you lose some rear-wheel braking bite with it and frankly, I like the balance of the OE setup better so changing out rear pads at ~40k intervals doesn't upset me all that much considering that they're cheap on that car (you can do brakes on those cars for ~$100/axle in parts including the rotors; if you just want to buy pads we're talking $25-30 or so for OE-quality stuff.)
Had this issue with a Mk2. Jetta GLI. Buy the harder pads and prolong at the cost of stopping (balance was the bigger issue really) or just replace more frequently. Opted for the latter. My Mk1 Dodge Caraval 5-spd MTX burned the rears (drums) in 20K miles. Crazy, but I digress.
 

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Rear tend to wear out faster in salt/snow belt areas , due to the way the parking hat traps salt inside the caliper
In regards to the rears wearing out faster than the front brakes, generally speaking it is the way you drive. I would like to see the evidence/proof your explanation is the reason.
 

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Rears dont wear out before the fronts, they only provide 30% of the braking power.
On VWs they do. It's how VW set them up and it's true for every VW sedan and wagon I've seen built in the last 20+ years; they typically go through two sets of pads/rotors on the rear axle for every one set in the front. They're the only vehicle where I've seen this consistently where something isn't wrong (e.g. stuck caliper, etc) but it IS consistent. You can stop it by using a less-aggressive pad in the rears (I have a specific recommendation for MKIV/5 cars) BUT you lose a small amount of stopping power. I won't trade stopping power for pad life; if I need to stop the car I NEED TO STOP THE CAR!

On my "6", like basically everything else I have and do own they wear at approximately the same rate.
 

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2017 Mazda Mazda6 Touring MTX & 2006 Mazdaspeed 6 Grand Touring
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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Does it matter if I do a brake/clutch flush and bleed before or after new brake pads/rotors?
 

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Rears dont wear out before the fronts, they only provide 30% of the braking power.
Yes but imagine this scenario which is how my AMG is "set up", operates, engineered.

Lets say you are driving in the city.. doing about 30 mph and you see the light turn red up ahead. Rather than race to that red light you very slowly, gently, barely apply the brakes slowing down in an effort to time the light and not have to completely stop. In this type of scenario the rears engage 1st and possibly the fronts won't engage at all unless you continue to apply more pressure. Rears in this situation are applying 100% of the braking power.

In the beginning when the car was brand new this is how I drove the car during break in and beyond with a lot of the city driving I was doing at the time. Wore the rears out at 12K miles. The fronts were still like new and didn't need replaced until 40K miles. I was surprised and baffled as much as anyone until the mechanic explained it to me.

Hope this makes sense. I'm not suggesting all cars are like this as I have no idea who else if any of them do this.
 

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Does it matter if I do a brake/clutch flush and bleed before or after new brake pads/rotors?
Not really but I recommend doing it AFTER a change if you're going to do the pads/rotors because when you retract the pistons the master cylinder fluid level will rise and if you do the fluid flush/change first and fill the reservoir all the way it's VERY likely when you reset the calipers you'll overflow the master and make a mess.
 

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Yes but imagine this scenario which is how my AMG is "set up", operates, engineered.

Lets say you are driving in the city.. doing about 30 mph and you see the light turn red up ahead. Rather than race to that red light you very slowly, gently, barely apply the brakes slowing down in an effort to time the light and not have to completely stop. In this type of scenario the rears engage 1st and possibly the fronts won't engage at all unless you continue to apply more pressure. Rears in this situation are applying 100% of the braking power.

In the beginning when the car was brand new this is how I drove the car during break in and beyond with a lot of the city driving I was doing at the time. Wore the rears out at 12K miles. The fronts were still like new and didn't need replaced until 40K miles. I was surprised and baffled as much as anyone until the mechanic explained it to me.

Hope this makes sense. I'm not suggesting all cars are like this as I have no idea who else if any of them do this.
Thats a RWD car, were talking about FWD.
 

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We (USA) only got the 2.2L Chrysler power plant (Dodge Omni GLH, Daytona Shelby) and the 2.6L Mitsubishi version where the Mopar was the one to get.
But, the Caravan DID come with a 5mt on the turbo.
 

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Thats a RWD car, were talking about FWD.
Yes, it's RWD. My bad. Didn't realize we were talking FWD only. That was also my 2007 I kept for almost 10 years so they have been doing it for quite awhile. Now I'm tempted to go out and check the rears on this one to see if they're wearing faster than the fronts.
 

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Yes, it's RWD. My bad. Didn't realize we were talking FWD only. That was also my 2007 I kept for almost 10 years so they have been doing it for quite awhile. Now I'm tempted to go out and check the rears on this one to see if they're wearing faster than the fronts.
Well, when i made that statement, i was talking FWD since the 6 is, didnt mean not to say anyhting about an RWD, just pointing out they have a diff bias. The drive wheels will have a greater bias than the non drive wheels. The rears on my Talon lasted a LONG time since it was AWD lol.
 
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