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Discussion Starter #1
Anybody else having issues with the OEM brake pads/rotors warping?

Dealer told me it's common.

What is everybody replacing with? I'm looking into some StopTech but a little pricy.
 
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Stoptech is overkill for street use.

In my experience, you will NOT experience warped rotors as long as you are not hard on the brakes. Warped rotors = your driving style needs a reality check. Dont treat the streets like a race track.

If you can source Textar, Pagid, Jurid or Ferodo brake pads along with zimmermann or textar rotors then that is exactly what I'd get. German OEM brakes are top notch.
 

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Most of the time "warped rotors" aren't. If someone tells you they are ask them to show you a dial indicator proving there is runout in the rotor surface. Betcha there isn't UNLESS someone did a brake job and didn't clean the mating surface of the hub and rotor, and thus torqued it down while "bending" it.

99% of the time on a street vehicle what you have is uneven deposition of pad material on the rotor, which is a function of improper (or no) bedding on the brakes. Then you get them good and hot before an even transfer of material has happened and STOP with the pads up against the rotor, which deposits a nice heavy layer right there, and that now has a higher coefficient of friction than the rest. The result -- a "pulsing" feel to your stopping, and it gets worse over time because where the friction is highest so is the heat so you get even MORE uneven deposits.

If you catch it before crystalline changes happen in the rotor you can scrub it off with a stainless steel wire brush and then go properly bed the brakes. Once the iron of the rotor has its crystalline structure altered unevenly, however, the only fix is to replace the rotor(s) that are impacted as it will happen again if you don't because the coefficient of friction of the metal is no longer even across the entire surface.
 
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Most of the time "warped rotors" aren't. If someone tells you they are ask them to show you a dial indicator proving there is runout in the rotor surface. Betcha there isn't UNLESS someone did a brake job and didn't clean the mating surface of the hub and rotor, and thus torqued it down while "bending" it.

99% of the time on a street vehicle what you have is uneven deposition of pad material on the rotor, which is a function of improper (or no) bedding on the brakes. Then you get them good and hot before an even transfer of material has happened and STOP with the pads up against the rotor, which deposits a nice heavy layer right there, and that now has a higher coefficient of friction than the rest. The result -- a "pulsing" feel to your stopping, and it gets worse over time because where the friction is highest so is the heat so you get even MORE uneven deposits.

If you catch it before crystalline changes happen in the rotor you can scrub it off with a stainless steel wire brush and then go properly bed the brakes. Once the iron of the rotor has its crystalline structure altered unevenly, however, the only fix is to replace the rotor(s) that are impacted as it will happen again if you don't because the coefficient of friction of the metal is no longer even across the entire surface.
How about in the case of brakes which feel warped but eventually its gets better or even goes away entirely with normal braking?
 

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Most of the time "warped rotors" aren't. If someone tells you they are ask them to show you a dial indicator proving there is runout in the rotor surface. Betcha there isn't UNLESS someone did a brake job and didn't clean the mating surface of the hub and rotor, and thus torqued it down while "bending" it.

99% of the time on a street vehicle what you have is uneven deposition of pad material on the rotor, which is a function of improper (or no) bedding on the brakes. Then you get them good and hot before an even transfer of material has happened and STOP with the pads up against the rotor, which deposits a nice heavy layer right there, and that now has a higher coefficient of friction than the rest. The result -- a "pulsing" feel to your stopping, and it gets worse over time because where the friction is highest so is the heat so you get even MORE uneven deposits.

If you catch it before crystalline changes happen in the rotor you can scrub it off with a stainless steel wire brush and then go properly bed the brakes. Once the iron of the rotor has its crystalline structure altered unevenly, however, the only fix is to replace the rotor(s) that are impacted as it will happen again if you don't because the coefficient of friction of the metal is no longer even across the entire surface.
Yes, generally speaking, not bedding the brake pads when new will make it much easier for the brakes to become warped in the manner mentioned. ^^ Unless the Rotors are damaged often times they can be turned and re used. New brake pads are a must. Bed them properly. If you don't understand this procedure youtube has a multitude of videos showing/explaining the process.

If the warping/pulsing has just started you can try and burn off the crystalline. It is a similar procedure to the break in of new pads. Again, youtube has several videos showing/explaining how to do this.

Rotors/brakes are hot from driving a bit spirited, coming down the mountain? Don't run through the water flowing across the road as an extreme temperature change (cold water splashing on hot rotors) can indeed warp the rotors.

Stoptech is overkill for street use.

In my experience, you will NOT experience warped rotors as long as you are not hard on the brakes. Warped rotors = your driving style needs a reality check. Dont treat the streets like a race track.

If you can source Textar, Pagid, Jurid or Ferodo brake pads along with zimmermann or textar rotors then that is exactly what I'd get. German OEM brakes are top notch.

I swear to goodness your posts become more and more asinine with each post.

Stop Tech is an excellent choice. It is not overkill. Last I checked we were driving Japanese cars, not German which means recommending German OEM brakes (is just stupid) is not the way to go. Do you recommend Japanese OEM brakes over on the BMW forum to them?
 

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I guess it depends on what you're looking for. Centric and Stop Tech are both decent options. Stop Tech are a bit more money but then again you can get 'em in slotted, which so long as they're not a LOT more expensive I like -- but do note that slotted rotors (1) cannot usually be turned and (2) tend to be a BIT noisier -- not much, but a little.

There's no reason to get drilled rotors. You're giving up a fair bit of area (and it is contact area that gives you the friction) and the rotors on these cars are a bit small in my opinion to begin with so I don't want to give up swept area without a very good reason. Slotted gives you all of the gas release drilled does with less loss of swept area. Slotting only really comes into play if you get the brakes quite hot; in normal street driving there's no benefit at all, but if you are frequently in the mountains or serious twisties where you are called on to use 'em (you ARE using engine braking, right?) then you might see some modest benefit.
 

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I can't BELIEVE the number of people I see NOT using engine-braking for long down-hill gradients. I am not advocating using engine braking instead of the normal service brakes for normal driving... but for long down-hill stretches, c'mon people, gear down one or two gears - maybe three!
 

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I guess it depends on what you're looking for. Centric and Stop Tech are both decent options. Stop Tech are a bit more money but then again you can get 'em in slotted, which so long as they're not a LOT more expensive I like -- but do note that slotted rotors (1) cannot usually be turned and (2) tend to be a BIT noisier -- not much, but a little.
I have slotted StopTech and you have to find a "specialist" to turn them. Something from the manufacturer about the cutting bit "impacting" the ridges of the slotting causing the metal to vibrate and that could cause molecular realignment making the rotors more brittle...or something. Apparently they need to be machined at half the regular speed (rate of bit cut). So far mine have been fine.
There's no reason to get drilled rotors.
Except their awesome look!
You're giving up a fair bit of area (and it is contact area that gives you the friction) and the rotors on these cars are a bit small in my opinion to begin with so I don't want to give up swept area without a very good reason. Slotted gives you all of the gas release drilled does with less loss of swept area. Slotting only really comes into play if you get the brakes quite hot; in normal street driving there's no benefit at all, but if you are frequently in the mountains or serious twisties where you are called on to use 'em (you ARE using engine braking, right?) then you might see some modest benefit.
Generally slotted last longer than drilled/slotted (even if the drilled look more aggressive) but unless you are running hot lap after hot lap you will likely never notice the difference. Gasses are vented sufficiently through the slots.

Bed you new rotors properly and you will likely never have issues.

Good advice ticker
 
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I swear to goodness your posts become more and more asinine with each post.

Stop Tech is an excellent choice. It is not overkill. Last I checked we were driving Japanese cars, not German which means recommending German OEM brakes (is just stupid) is not the way to go. Do you recommend Japanese OEM brakes over on the BMW forum to them?

Maybe it's just your consistently high levels of sheer ignorance. Just a thought.

Stoptech brakes need to have some heat in them in order to operate at maximum effectiveness, especially on a cold day doing long stretches of highway with little braking. That's what I call overkill for street use.



This is a post I have made on a CX-5 forum quite a while back. That dude Anchorman has worked for a brake company for 17 years, and as you might imagine knows quite a bit about the stuff. I strongly recommend you read through all of his posts as it is very interesting. @tickerguy, even you should find this a very interesting and informative read. He went quite in depth explaining the dusty brake pad material on the German brakes I keep mentioning and why they are an overall excellent choice regarding of the way you drive.

 
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Japanese friction material (sometimes made under license in the USA) causes warped rotors). They hate black dust with a passion and tend to use very expensive fillers and friction modifiers to prevent it. The material lasts longer than anything we at Ferodo or the other European manufacturer could come near to but it has a problem. The wear rate is low enough that it doesn’t self clean and that is the black on the disc I was on about above. Some of the material and wear debris get transferred onto the disc and as it is often patchy, there are times when the pads work on the disc and times when it travels over transferred friction material. The result is known as DTV (disc thickness variation) so not warped as such but thick and thin as the pads travel. This was first recognised by Ferodo back in the early 90s when Ford were having problems with the Sierra. The answer is to bulk up the abrasive which effectively sands the discs clean and keeps them dead true. You will never get a BMW, Audi or Merc with warped discs unless they have been stood for months. They use super aggressive pads which keep the discs very bright but will wear them out. The discs are seen as sacrificial but the performance stays good.

Both Mazda and Toyota caught a cold with long life pads, it cost them thousands in warranty claims. If a customer complains about brake judder, they have to stand the cost as it is a fault. If a customer wears a set of very excitable pads out in 6 months, he stands the cost! Both Mazda and Toyota have a kind of half way hybrid now that gives a reasonable balance and that is what you are experiencing on your 6. Which way is best? Well first you have to consider what causes wear. It is a direct effect of heat. In the first 12 months, I wore more than half my pad thickness away on my 2016.5 but I was happy with that because my journey to work is over some very long steep hills. The pads are bonded together with a resin system that degrades with heat - exponentially. At “normal" city driving temperature it gives reasonable wear but if you double the temperature you start squaring up the wear and by about the time they get towards glowing, the wear is off the scale. That is why CX-5 owners see such a wide range of pad wear. It depends what you want. If you want really good performance and high friction you are almost certainly going to sacrifice life. Miss Daisy, pottering around barely getting any temperature would actually be better with the German pads as she can bring her standard pads to a standstill - friction material MUST see temperature to condition the pad surface. A sales rep who drives hard might be better with the Jap stuff as he will keep it active. Its horses for courses.
 

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Anybody else having issues with the OEM brake pads/rotors warping?

Dealer told me it's common.

What is everybody replacing with? I'm looking into some StopTech but a little pricy.

I have Centric Rotors (front & rear), they're standard replacement and cheap so I go those. I have the powerstop Z23 brake pads they're better than stock and still rated for street use (although I abused them on the track as well).
 

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Anybody else having issues with the OEM brake pads/rotors warping?

Dealer told me it's common.

What is everybody replacing with? I'm looking into some StopTech but a little pricy.
I had problems with warpage as well in my 2014 Mazda 6 and finally went with lifetime guaranteed rotors from Brake Performance on line for around $135 for drilled and slotted ones. They have been on about 8 months and have not given any problems yet. I had been getting 15-25k before warpage. I am fairly certain it is in the material - some manufacturers use inferior materials (Chinese) - lack of quality control
 

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I had problems with warpage as well in my 2014 Mazda 6 and finally went with lifetime guaranteed rotors from Brake Performance on line for around $135 for drilled and slotted ones. They have been on about 8 months and have not given any problems yet. I had been getting 15-25k before warpage. I am fairly certain it is in the material - some manufacturers use inferior materials (Chinese) - lack of quality control
Warpage usually happens from bad driving habits, like jamming on them last minute and holding the pads down while at a stop light. Granted, there are times when you CANT help doing that, but usually youll know when you need to start slowing down to stop and you can brake, let up, brake, let up and gradually heat the rotors and then if at all possible, keep your foot off the brake pedal if you felt the rotors start to wobble the steering wheel.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'm 100% confident it's not from my driving habits, I think the OEM quality is not where I want it on the pads and/or rotors. Anybody here using Stop Tech?
 

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I'm 100% confident it's not from my driving habits, I think the OEM quality is not where I want it on the pads and/or rotors. Anybody here using Stop Tech?
I am using StopTech with good results. I drive an old engine and as a result the only real "thrill" I get when I drive is cornering and braking so those components get well used.
I think proper bedding is an important step for brake longevity. I have no issues (1.5yrs) at all with the pads (308 Street) or rotors (319mm slotted).
 
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I'm 100% confident it's not from my driving habits, I think the OEM quality is not where I want it on the pads and/or rotors. Anybody here using Stop Tech?
Get to roughly 50 MPH, firmly "squeeze" the brakes as hard as you can without locking your tires or enaging ABS, DO NOT come to full stop. This should wear off those uneven deposits and make the brakes feel smooth again.

Unless you've already been doing this too much, and pressed the hot pad into the rotor and warped it that way (being too aggressive with the brakes)
 

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Japanese friction material (sometimes made under license in the USA) causes warped rotors). They hate black dust with a passion and tend to use very expensive fillers and friction modifiers to prevent it. The material lasts longer than anything we at Ferodo or the other European manufacturer could come near to but it has a problem. The wear rate is low enough that it doesn’t self clean and that is the black on the disc I was on about above. Some of the material and wear debris get transferred onto the disc and as it is often patchy, there are times when the pads work on the disc and times when it travels over transferred friction material. The result is known as DTV (disc thickness variation) so not warped as such but thick and thin as the pads travel. This was first recognised by Ferodo back in the early 90s when Ford were having problems with the Sierra. The answer is to bulk up the abrasive which effectively sands the discs clean and keeps them dead true. You will never get a BMW, Audi or Merc with warped discs unless they have been stood for months. They use super aggressive pads which keep the discs very bright but will wear them out. The discs are seen as sacrificial but the performance stays good.
I am currently considering the purchase of a used Mazda6 Touring and came here for the intentions of researching the car.

I can attest to the longevity and quality of German OEM brakes as I am coming from owning both an Audi A4 and VW Jetta GLI (current). Up until recently, all of my pads and rotors were factory on the GLI. The fronts are still on the car and I just replaced the rears a few months back. The car currently sits at just shy of 119,000 miles. Since new the car has stopped on a dime and I've never had the slightest hint of uneven wear or buildup, and I am hard on a car. I had concerns about the brakes being on the car for so long and the dealer service checks were always marked as not needing to be replaced, so I brought it up with my service adviser. He said that he has plenty of cars still on the OEM pads and rotors and it's just not something they have to worry about much. I was amazed as every other car I've owned needed brakes replaced much more frequently. I'm about to trade in my car with the factory installed brakes still on the front wheels. It says a lot about the materials used.
 
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