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Revolution Performance Motorsports will soon be offering replacement upper control arms for the Mazda 6 and Mazdaspeed 6. They will be non-adjustable and will provide approximately 1.5 to 1.7 degrees of negative camber with the car lowered 1 to 1.25 inches. The cost is estimated to be around $275 for both the left and right upper control arms.

In the process of trying to find a solution, the company that we are working with determined that going with a non-adjustable replacement would be the most cost-effective. Those who have taken the time to examine the stock upper control arm probably noticed that the upper ball joint is permanently attached and thus, is neither removable or serviceable. Because of this, it's not possible to simply modify the upper ball joint to allow for any adjustability. This is why no one has released "camber plates" or anything similar.

In an effort to keep them affordable, they decided to create the negative camber by modifying the stock upper control arms at the point where the control arms mount to the vehicle (since the ball joint is non-serviceable). This is done by cutting off the stock bracket (the barrel that holds bushing) and welding in a new bushing mount at a determined distance closer to the ball joint. The replacement mounts are built in a fixture in order to ensure they are manufactured accurately and the replacement bushings are polyurethane bushings in a steel sleeve, which provides smoother and easier motion.

Feedback from initial testing has been overwhelmingly positive. Turn-in is greatly improved, allowing for quick and smooth lane changes. Tire squeal was also greatly reduced during hard/sharp cornering, as would be expected.

So... Are you interested? Tell us what you think!
 

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Revolution Performance Motorsports will soon be offering replacement upper control arms for the Mazda 6 and Mazdaspeed 6. They will be non-adjustable and will provide approximately 1.5 to 1.7 degrees of negative camber with the car lowered 1 to 1.25 inches. The cost is estimated to be around $275 for both the left and right upper control arms.

In the process of trying to find a solution, the company that we are working with determined that going with a non-adjustable replacement would be the most cost-effective. Those who have taken the time to examine the stock upper control arm probably noticed that the upper ball joint is permanently attached and thus, is neither removable or serviceable. Because of this, it's not possible to simply modify the upper ball joint to allow for any adjustability. This is why no one has released "camber plates" or anything similar.

In an effort to keep them affordable, they decided to create the negative camber by modifying the stock upper control arms at the point where the control arms mount to the vehicle (since the ball joint is non-serviceable). This is done by cutting off the stock bracket (the barrel that holds bushing) and welding in a new bushing mount at a determined distance closer to the ball joint. The replacement mounts are built in a fixture in order to ensure they are manufactured accurately and the replacement bushings are polyurethane bushings in a steel sleeve, which provides smoother and easier motion.

Feedback from initial testing has been overwhelmingly positive. Turn-in is greatly improved, allowing for quick and smooth lane changes. Tire squeal was also greatly reduced during hard/sharp cornering, as would be expected.

So... Are you interested? Tell us what you think!
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Interested; yes. Have you measured camber change on a non-lowered car?
 

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This is great news! (And it was last time someone promised such a product, too! :p)

To be honest, I think adjustable upper arms would be a bit cumbersome to adjust, and if I'd of had them, I would have probably just left them at the same setting year-round. Non-adjustable is fine with me (since it lowers the price), and 1.5-1.7 degrees is exactly what I would have wanted. That's enough to make a huge difference in cornering grip without a huge penalty in tire wear or braking distances.

Interested; yes. Have you measured camber change on a non-lowered car?
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Stock, the camber curve is pretty shallow during that first inch; expect it to be at most half a degree different. The camber curve accelerates beyond that inch and doesn't get really aggressive until after two inches. Shorter arms will quicken the camber curve but I still think you'll only see a half degree gain in the first inch of bump travel.
 

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Can they give an approximate camber measurement for a car lowered about 2.5 inches. Or an measurement throughtout the entire range of height adjustment. Either way I'll most likely be in on this. Adjsutable would be better but I'm not going to complain.
 

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Just a side note, you might get more interest from the MS6 guys if you put another thread in the MS6 section (a lot of those guys don't look anywhere else).
 

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Any chance of getting a sketch comparing the stock/modified geometry at a few points (-1", -2", -3" perhaps)? I would assume that someone laid this out in CAD, so it ought to be relatively simple.
 

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How much do the stock replacements cost??
Does anyone have the dimensions of the stock arms or a CAD file of the stock... I work on CAD all day long and can draw these up ...there was another thread where they were trying to make them adjustable using the stock arms...but i like the idea of relocating the bushing like RPM did (keeps the strength)

Any chance of getting a sketch comparing the stock/modified geometry at a few points (-1", -2", -3" perhaps)? I would assume that someone laid this out in CAD, so it ought to be relatively simple.
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Very interested.

Just thinking out loud here but if they are already going to hack off the ends of the upper control arm and replace the bushings, why not just weld in threaded inserts and heim joints. It can't be that much more per arm can it? Are they set on poly bushings for a smoother ride?
 

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I am of course interested. It will depend on timing as I'm rebuilding one car already :)
 

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Very interested.

Just thinking out loud here but if they are already going to hack off the ends of the upper control arm and replace the bushings, why not just weld in threaded inserts and heim joints. It can't be that much more per arm can it? Are they set on poly bushings for a smoother ride? [/b]
threaded inserts and heim joints are not such a great idea for street driving. aside from the harshness in the suspension over every bump and crack in the pavement, maintenance on these items is required much more frequently as the parts wear out a lot quicker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Any chance of getting a sketch comparing the stock/modified geometry at a few points (-1", -2", -3" perhaps)? I would assume that someone laid this out in CAD, so it ought to be relatively simple.
[/b]
As RPM is not creating these themselves, we do not have direct access to anything like this. I'm not sure if the manufacturer would be willing to release it or not, but I will ask.

How much do the stock replacements cost?? [/b]
MSRP is just over $100 per side, though some dealers sell them for a bit lower than this.


Just thinking out loud here but if they are already going to hack off the ends of the upper control arm and replace the bushings, why not just weld in threaded inserts and heim joints. It can't be that much more per arm can it? Are they set on poly bushings for a smoother ride?
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We are not looking to transform anyone's vehicle into a race car. We want to provide a part that will provide great benefits to the enthusiast, but that also will be low-maintenance and maintain a reasonable ride quality.
 

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They will be non-adjustable and will provide approximately 1.5 to 1.7 degrees of negative camber with the car lowered 1 to 1.25 inches. [/b]
So does that mean this will actually lower the car another 1 to 1.25 inches plus whatever else your coilover/spring drop is?
 

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So does that mean this will actually lower the car another 1 to 1.25 inches plus whatever else your coilover/spring drop is?
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Negative. (well it will sliiiiightly but the difference will be unnoticeable and inconsequential) It will merely increase the camber at a given ride height by making the top control arm shorter than it currently is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
So does that mean this will actually lower the car another 1 to 1.25 inches plus whatever else your coilover/spring drop is?
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sl1200 is correct. This does not lower the car. It only adjusts the camber. However, the difference in camber is related to the amount the car has been dropped, which is why we quoted the difference at 1 to 1.25 inches, which is how much most people lower their cars.
 
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