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I did mine over the weekend. I spent about a half hour trying to get the car simultaneously safely elevated and leveled using a combination of ramps, jack stands, and jacks, to no avail. I finally decided I would leave the car on the ground, measure the fluid level from the factory, then elevate the front with ramps, drain and partially fill (3 qts) the ATF, then put it back on the ground and do the final level adjustment. Worked great. I got *really* good at removing/replacing the air box.

One caution: each time you measure the fluid, you need to cycle the shifter (car running; brakes on) through P, R, N, D. Otherwise you don't get an accurate reading.

End result was smoother shifting and peace of mind. I'll do it again in 30,000 miles (we're at 85k now).
 

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Hi folks, newb mazda owner here. I used to work in a transmission shop. I honestly believe in changing your tranny fluid every 30,000 miles. That being said, I just bought a 2014 mazda 6 with 68,000 miles on it. I asked the dealership i bought it from to do a transmission flush and change the filter. They told me not necessary until 100,000 miles and even then its just inspection. I told them sorry, I want to flush the fluid and change the filter. Local dealership said there is no filter to change. I showed them the part number for a filter and went to a different dealership. 2nd dealership called in the shop foreman to talk with me. I asked him how often he changed his fluid. He said he didnt drive a mazda but did his every 30,000 just like me. He said there is no way to connect the flush machine to the skyactive tranny to do a catalytic converter flush so all they could do was drop the pan install a new filter and run the 4 quarts through which only removes about half the old fluid. I would have to run it for an hour or so and drain and repeat to get more of the converter fluid out. I caught the shop foreman in the break room and slipped him a 20$. When he gave me the car back he said he dug up about 3 more quarts in the shop and ran it through so if i believe him i should be good to go for another 60,000 between what i believe and the factory does. The mazda tranny fluid is blue and expensive. Its a non maintenance item because they last past the warranty but just barely. If you plan on keeping your car and driving the wheels off it like i do mine change the blue stuff and drop the pan, do the filter and do more than the single flush. My opinion fwiw.
Heres the scary part. You could ask for the same thing but your local stealership may stroke you and not bother to drop the pan and put in the filter, but just charge you for it thinking your crazy for asking for it. Maybe asking for the old filter back would help. Reinforcing what i just posted. The fluid is not supposed to be green or brown. Its supposed to be blue. Mine is now.
This is one of the funniest things I've read in a long long time.
 

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How can I have the dealership prove that they changed the auto transmission fluid? They could simply use an old filter - that's not from your car?

If you ask them to show you checking the transmission fluid dip stick level - can that show that the fluid has been replaced?

Is it like engine oil, that the fluid on the dip stick will look transparent (meaning that it's new and clean)?

Thanks
 

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So is it not possible to change the ATF filter on the Mazda6 ? Just the the ATF?
No this is not true. The filter is integrated into the transmission pan, so you'll have to order a new one. Be sure to properly reseal the new one with a gasket to avoid leaks. Changing every 50-60K is optimal. I would avoid doing just a drain/fill especially if you are doing it for the first time with over 120,000 miles because this increases the chance of little metal shavings stuck in your transmission filter breaking free and getting trapped in one of the many intricate passageways in your transmission causing complete failure. Most of the metal shavings that get trapped in the filter come from when the transmission was breaking in, early on in it's life (first 10-20,000KM) meaning that first pan filter change at 60k miles is important. IMO changing the fluid every 30K is simply excessive and doesn't make any sense. By 60K your pan's filter will not be in good shape so I would definitely suggest not to leave the original pan in if you care about your car.

My car is approaching 75K miles, so I will be doing my transmission fluid + pan very soon along with brakes and spark plugs. I will be using Redline D4 fluid.
 

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No this is not true. The filter is integrated into the transmission pan, so you'll have to order a new one. Be sure to properly reseal the new one with a gasket to avoid leaks. Changing every 50-60K is optimal. I would avoid doing just a drain/fill especially if you are doing it for the first time with over 120,000 miles because this increases the chance of little metal shavings stuck in your transmission filter breaking free and getting trapped in one of the many intricate passageways in your transmission causing complete failure. Most of the metal shavings that get trapped in the filter come from when the transmission was breaking in, early on in it's life (first 10-20,000KM) meaning that first pan filter change at 60k miles is important. IMO changing the fluid every 30K is simply excessive and doesn't make any sense. By 60K your pan's filter will not be in good shape so I would definitely suggest not to leave the original pan in if you care about your car.

My car is approaching 75K miles, so I will be doing my transmission fluid + pan very soon along with brakes and spark plugs. I will be using Redline D4 fluid.
Use only mazda gear oil Type-FZ
[ame]https://www.amazon.com/Mazda-Genuine-0000-FZ-113E-01-Automatic-Transmission/dp/B00P2P3HCQ[/ame]
 

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I second the notion of only using Mazda FZ transmission fluid. I'd never use a non-OEM transmission fluid on any ATX.

This transmission was designed to use a fluid of a very specific viscosity. Mazda FZ fluid is exactly this viscosity. Aftermarket fluid will be close, but not exact. There are solenoids and gears inside a transmission, but the fluid is what actually makes things happen. Solenoids let fluid into different chambers, and the pressure from the fluid makes the transmission switch gears. When you don't change your transmission fluid, it becomes thicker, which makes it harder to get into the places it needs to get to. If you use an aftermarket fluid that is already thicker to begin with, it's like starting off at a disadvantage. Maybe the aftermarket stuff will hold its viscosity and lubricating properties longer. Or maybe it won't. I don't know of any tests that have been done.



If you're talking about going to a Mazda dealership, I highly doubt they just have old transmission filters laying around. I imagine they don't change transmission fluid filters very often, and no garage is going to keep old garbage around. If you pay them to do a job, they are going to do it correctly.

Checking the dipstick would tell you, as new fluid is supposed to be a light blue, and used stuff will be dark colored. But to ask them to show you would mean that you REALLY don't trust this place. To think that you'd pay them for a fluid and filter replacement and they would just do nothing and give your car back, you'd have to be going to a very shady dealership. I could believe a mom and pop mechanic might possibly do that, but not a dealership.
While what you said in theory makes sense, transmission's aren't as picky with their fluids as you claim they are. I will be using Redline D4 fluid in mine as it's time to change and that is a top notch fluid. Will report on how it feels.

The dealer will likely only do a drain and fill and nothing more. If you convince them to actually touch your transmission, that is. With the reputation of most Mazda dealers I wouldn't waste my time.
 

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So is it not possible to change the ATF filter on the Mazda6 ? Just the the ATF?
No this is not true. The filter is integrated into the transmission pan, so you'll have to order a new one. Be sure to properly reseal the new one with a gasket to avoid leaks.
Is this really true... i.e. that the transmission filter is integral with the pan and so the pan /filter ass'y needs to be changed out every time you want to change your ATF filter? That's really weird and dumb.
 

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So I changed out the automatic transmission fluid in my 2014 Touring over the labor day weekend....
.....To access the dipstick I had to remove the air intake box which required turning the car off. Reading the manual it says to check the dipstick with the car running. How do you access the dipstick without removing the intake box? The car won't run with the airbox removed. I've put about 100 miles on the car since and it's been driving fine so I'm not too worried, but just curious how others check their transmission fluid level?
Does anyone have an answer? I would have thought the ATF level check would involve a weir tube and an accurate ATF temp assessment... putting the transmission controller into svce mode, etc... ????
 

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Is this really true... i.e. that the transmission filter is integral with the pan and so the pan /filter ass'y needs to be changed out every time you want to change your ATF filter? That's really weird and dumb.
Yup, BMW's use the exact same method. It's to just make more money from buying extra parts. I wish the pan was metal and the filter was just removable and replaceable.
 

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Does anyone have an answer? I would have thought the ATF level check would involve a weir tube and an accurate ATF temp assessment... putting the transmission controller into svce mode, etc... ????
Yup, BMW's use the exact same method. It's to just make more money from buying extra parts. I wish the pan was metal and the filter was just removable and replaceable.
It's to keep shade tree mechanics from screwing things up they shouldn't be messing with.

If you pull the pan be prepared to remove the seal completely and create a perfect mounting surface or you're going to be cleaning the garage floor every day and constantly checking the ATM fluid. Still no guarantee it will be sealed/torqued correctly.

If you must change the ATM oil use the drain plug and replace the amount that comes out. You're simply asking for trouble going beyond that. It's called upsetting the apple cart.
 

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ATF Level Check and Adjustment... appears to be a combination of a cap-screw retained dipstick (with apparently horribly bad access i.e. under the airbox) and the need to ensure the ATF temp is in a certain range (around 122 degrees F). Needless to say the car has to be level and a person has to cycle between all transmission quadrant positions and the car has to be idling. First two screenprints... for a 2014 model (can't vouch for applicability beyond 2014... but likely it is applicable). There may be a way to put atf logic module into service mode and to use it to determine atf temp...
 

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So is it not possible to change the ATF filter on the Mazda6 ? Just the the ATF?
No this is not true. The filter is integrated into the transmission pan, so you'll have to order a new one. Be sure to properly reseal the new one with a gasket to avoid leaks.
Is this really true... i.e. that the transmission filter is integral with the pan and so the pan /filter ass'y needs to be changed out every time you want to change your ATF filter? That's really weird and dumb.
You don't need to put on a whole new pan, only put on a new gasket.

So I changed out the automatic transmission fluid in my 2014 Touring over the labor day weekend....
.....To access the dipstick I had to remove the air intake box which required turning the car off. Reading the manual it says to check the dipstick with the car running. How do you access the dipstick without removing the intake box? The car won't run with the airbox removed. I've put about 100 miles on the car since and it's been driving fine so I'm not too worried, but just curious how others check their transmission fluid level?
Does anyone have an answer? I would have thought the ATF level check would involve a weir tube and an accurate ATF temp assessment... putting the transmission controller into svce mode, etc... ????
Not sure you would need to go through that much trouble. The transmission is a sealed system, the only way the fluid level would change is if it was leaking. That's why they don't tell you to change it, because the fluid will stay at the same level and so could potentially continue working. If you don't see any leaks, then assume the fluid is at the same level as when it was new.

Now, just pull the dipstick and mark what level it's at cold. After you drain it, fill it back up to that same level.

You could also buy one of these like I did:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00G05AFYA?psc=1&ref=yo_pop_mb_pd_title

Drain all the fluid into that, put it on a level surface, mark the fluid level with a marker. Pour our the old fluid, fill it with new fluid to the same level. Then use the spout to pour the new fluid into the transmission. It might go without saying, but this method will only work if you're doing a drain and fill. If you drop the pan then you're not going to catch all the fluid in this pitcher.
 

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To be honest... a lot of trouble for the average person... to do it right and to ensure absolute cleanliness. It would not stop me...but I'm just that kind of person. I can see why Mazda dissuades even Mazda techs from doing this.
 

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It's to keep shade tree mechanics from screwing things up they shouldn't be messing with.

If you pull the pan be prepared to remove the seal completely and create a perfect mounting surface or you're going to be cleaning the garage floor every day and constantly checking the ATM fluid. Still no guarantee it will be sealed/torqued correctly.

If you must change the ATM oil use the drain plug and replace the amount that comes out. You're simply asking for trouble going beyond that. It's called upsetting the apple cart.
drain/fill is useless because you're only getting a small fraction of fluid out of your transmission and it can potentially be quite dangerous at higher mileage if you are not replacing your pan. If you clean the surface area very well and apply gasket properly (being sure not to apply too much or it will seep into your transmission) and then torque everything down properly you won't run into any issues. It's the best and only correct way to service your transmission.

To be honest... a lot of trouble for the average person... to do it right and to ensure absolute cleanliness. It would not stop me...but I'm just that kind of person. I can see why Mazda dissuades even Mazda techs from doing this.
They did it like this on purpose. They want to make it complicated and dissuade the techs from doing it so that your transmission gets dirty and just fails once the warranty period is up in hopes of you bringing your car to the dealer for a very overpriced trans replacement. They take your old unit, rebuild it and then resell maximizing their profits.
 

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drain/fill is useless because you're only getting a small fraction of fluid out of your transmission and it can potentially be quite dangerous at higher mileage if you are not replacing your pan. If you clean the surface area very well and apply gasket properly (being sure not to apply too much or it will seep into your transmission) and then torque everything down properly you won't run into any issues. It's the best and only correct way to service your transmission.



They did it like this on purpose. They want to make it complicated and dissuade the techs from doing it so that your transmission gets dirty and just fails once the warranty period is up in hopes of you bringing your car to the dealer for a very overpriced trans replacement. They take your old unit, rebuild it and then resell maximizing their profits.
You dish out so much misinformation. Yeah Mazda or for that matter others design their products to fail right after warranty so that customers come back to them again and again to purchase their 'wonderfully reliable' product and make them tons of money. Aah! my head hurts when people come up with this kind of stupid logic. :frown2:

Have you heard of something called 'factor of safety' in engineering design? If a car jack is rated at 1000 lbs it does not break at 1001 lbs, it can take loads of 2000 or even 3000 lbs before it does. Engineers design stuff for 3,4 or 5 times the normal operating parameters, for critical components the factor of safety is even more. When Mazda says lifetime transmission they would have tested it not to just 60K miles warranty limit but many times more. You know that the engines does not conk off at 60K miles, they go to 300K or even more. You should be replacing the pistons, rings and connecting rods in your car every 60K miles if you really believe in what you preach.
 

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drain/fill is useless because you're only getting a small fraction of fluid out of your transmission and it can potentially be quite dangerous at higher mileage if you are not replacing your pan. If you clean the surface area very well and apply gasket properly (being sure not to apply too much or it will seep into your transmission) and then torque everything down properly you won't run into any issues. It's the best and only correct way to service your transmission.



They did it like this on purpose. They want to make it complicated and dissuade the techs from doing it so that your transmission gets dirty and just fails once the warranty period is up in hopes of you bringing your car to the dealer for a very overpriced trans replacement. They take your old unit, rebuild it and then resell maximizing their profits.
You dish out so much misinformation. Yeah Mazda or for that matter others design their products to fail right after warranty so that customers come back to them again and again to purchase their 'wonderfully reliable' product and make them tons of money. Aah! my head hurts when people come up with this kind of stupid logic. <img src="http://forum.mazda6club.com/images/Mazda6Club_2014/smilies/tango_face_sad.png" border="0" alt="" title="Frown" class="inlineimg" />

Have you heard of something called 'factor of safety' in engineering design? If a car jack is rated at 1000 lbs it does not break at 1001 lbs, it can take loads of 2000 or even 3000 lbs before it does. Engineers design stuff for 3,4 or 5 times the normal operating parameters, for critical components the factor of safety is even more. When Mazda says lifetime transmission they would have tested it not to just 60K miles warranty limit but many times more. You know that the engines does not conk off at 60K miles, they go to 300K or even more. You should be replacing the pistons, rings and connecting rods in your car every 60K miles if you really believe in what you preach.
Exactly
My Mazda Dealer provides a lifetime unlimited mileage warranty on the engine and transmission.
I doubt they would do that if they felt the factory was building them to fail.
 

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You dish out so much misinformation. Yeah Mazda or for that matter others design their products to fail right after warranty so that customers come back to them again and again to purchase their 'wonderfully reliable' product and make them tons of money. Aah! my head hurts when people come up with this kind of stupid logic. :frown2:

Have you heard of something called 'factor of safety' in engineering design? If a car jack is rated at 1000 lbs it does not break at 1001 lbs, it can take loads of 2000 or even 3000 lbs before it does. Engineers design stuff for 3,4 or 5 times the normal operating parameters, for critical components the factor of safety is even more. When Mazda says lifetime transmission they would have tested it not to just 60K miles warranty limit but many times more. You know that the engines does not conk off at 60K miles, they go to 300K or even more. You should be replacing the pistons, rings and connecting rods in your car every 60K miles if you really believe in what you preach.
Well, that's the conclusion a bunch of BMW owners came to at e90post and their transmission has the identical pan filter design as our cars. Just because you are unsure of something because there is insufficient information on your part to confirm otherwise, does not mean I am automatically wrong with my logic.

Explain why else Mazda claims the transmission fluid is "lifetime" fill, but allows an overly complex procedure to change your pan/fluid along with the necessary parts and fluid to do so.

hmm...
 

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You dish out so much misinformation. Yeah Mazda or for that matter others design their products to fail right after warranty so that customers come back to them again and again to purchase their 'wonderfully reliable' product and make them tons of money. Aah! my head hurts when people come up with this kind of stupid logic. <img src="http://forum.mazda6club.com/images/Mazda6Club_2014/smilies/tango_face_sad.png" border="0" alt="" title="Frown" class="inlineimg" />

Have you heard of something called 'factor of safety' in engineering design? If a car jack is rated at 1000 lbs it does not break at 1001 lbs, it can take loads of 2000 or even 3000 lbs before it does. Engineers design stuff for 3,4 or 5 times the normal operating parameters, for critical components the factor of safety is even more. When Mazda says lifetime transmission they would have tested it not to just 60K miles warranty limit but many times more. You know that the engines does not conk off at 60K miles, they go to 300K or even more. You should be replacing the pistons, rings and connecting rods in your car every 60K miles if you really believe in what you preach.
Well, that's the conclusion a bunch of BMW owners came to at e90post and their transmission has the identical pan filter design as our cars. Just because you are unsure of something because there is insufficient information on your part to confirm otherwise, does not mean I am automatically wrong with my logic.

Explain why else Mazda claims the transmission fluid is "lifetime" fill, but allows an overly complex procedure to change your pan/fluid along with the necessary parts and fluid to do so.

hmm...
I think you came to a perfectly logical conclusion based on what happened to those BMWs. And if it leads you to over-maintain your Mazda, then great! I believe you'll be better off than someone who under-maintains.

BMWs are notorious for breaking down. Mazdas, not so much. If I'm not mistaken, North American BMWs are made in Mexico, using parts that are inferior to the German-made ones that are sold in Europe. Theres no comparison between an outsourced vehicle like a BMW and a true, Japanese-made Japanese-engineered Mazda when it comes to reliability. The Mazda will be able to handle a lot more durability-wise.

Does BMW purposely make them to fail, or are they just cheaping out on quality parts? I honestly couldn't say, but it's two faces of the same coin.
 
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