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Whenever available, the GF-5 Mazda/Idemitsu Moly 0W20 would be tops on my list. The slippery chock full of molybdenum amount in this syn oil is highly beneficial to the superb fuel economy numbers and low wear/low friction properties for the long stroke 2.5L. Well formulated by Mazda engineers for the Sky-Activ series engines. My fall back/2nd choice, the Mobil 1 Advanced Fuel Economy (AFE) (5qt jug) from my oil stash..

For warranty requirements, I'd play safe and stick to 0W20. Besides, there is no such thing as a GF-5 5W30 Mazda Moly..:)
 

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Moly Basics

Molybdenum Disulfide

Molybdenum is a very hard metal with a number of industrial uses.
It is combined with chromium in steel to make the steel harder and more resistant to bending. Most of the bicycle frames produced today use chromium and molybdenum steel. Because the steel is so much harder, the manufacturers can use less, thereby making the frame lighter.

Molybdenum Disulfide (Moly) has been used for decades in lubricating pastes and greases because it is slippery and forms a protective coating on metal parts.

Moly exists as microscopic hexagonal crystal platelets. Several molecules make up one of these platelets. A single molecule of Moly contains two sulfur atoms and one molybdenum atom. Moly platelets are attracted to metal surfaces. This attraction and the force of moving engine parts rubbing across one another provide the necessary thermochemical reaction necessary for Moly to form an overlapping protective coating like armor on all of your engine parts. This protective armor coating has a number of properties that are very beneficial for your engine. The Moly platelets that make up the protective layers on your engine surfaces slide across one another very easily. Instead of metal rubbing against metal, you have Moly platelets moving across one another protecting and lubricating the metal engine parts.

This coating effectively fills in the microscopic pores that cover the surface of all engine parts, making them smoother. This feature is important in providing an effective seal on the combustion chamber. By filling in the craters and pores Moly improves this seal allowing for more efficient combustion and engine performance.



This overlapping coating of Moly also gives protection against loading (perpendicular) forces. These forces occur on the bearings, and lifters. The high pressures that occur between these moving parts tend to squeeze normal lubricants out.

Eventually, there is metal to metal contact, which damages these moving parts and creates large amounts of heat. Fortunately, this is not the case with some lubricants.The layer of moly that forms on these moving surfaces can withstand pressures of 500,000 psi, without being squeezed out.

Engineers and scientists have tried for years to use Moly in motor oils but they had been unsuccessful because they could not find a way to keep Moly in suspension. Once Moly was put into suspension it would gradually settle out. It was easy to see it come out of suspension because a black sludge would collect on the bottom of the oil containers. In engines it would settle to the bottom of the crankcase or clog oil pathways and filters.



Engineers have overcome these obstacles. They have developed a process that keeps Moly in suspension and isn’t filtered out. Since that time theproduct has undergone extensive independent testing in labs and in the field for many years to insure that the product stands up to the rigorous needs of today’s engines. With the plating action of Moly reducing friction which reduces heat, this helps keep rings free from carbon buildup, prevents blow-by, decreases emission, and extends oil life.

Moly Basics - Bob is the Oil Guy
 

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My driving habits calls for 5k+ miles/6mos of mostly 65%/35% fwy/city driving. So it's just about right (below 7,500mi) for a 6 month dealer OCI to keep warranty things in effect. I'd bring my own syn oil of choice every time I pull into my dealership for OCI service...and I'd keep things safe and my M6 car life simple (and I'm not about to pull hairs on Moly and being anal, tri-nuclearama-jig or not). As much as I am big on thick oils for years (and still am with a stash full; had a 1.8T German, fed on a variety of xW30-xW40 syn oil with a Mannolator filter)...I'd stick to 0W20 (Mobil 1 AFE, good..Mazda/Idemitsu Moly, the better!) for the M6, while on American soil.
 

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I've been getting mine locally in Baltimore for $6.85/qt, no shipping, but 6% state tax. I'm no stranger to high dollar oils (my G37x likes Motul X-Max 5W-30). The highest dollar 0W-20 is Eneos Sustina (about $10/quart if not $12), and extra moly or not, I beg to think that it's higher quality oil than the Mazda branded Idemitsu, which is no slouch in its own right. Sustina uses a proprietary polymer that encapsulates dirt in an effort to minimize sludging. Boutique oils all have some angle, whether it be base stock (4 or 5) and/or proprietary polymer additives.

Contrary to popular opinion, and flame if you must, Mobil 1 is not even on par to Pennzoil Ultra at any given viscocity.
Sustina (con Moly) can be had from NAPA. It is premium indeed over the Mazda Moly. But for practical reasons, for me...the Mazda is pretty good enough for the M6.

That Mazda Moly with your state tax is but a penny less where I will get mine net, ($6.19/qt + shipping) for a case to my door. 2 cases would lower the price/qt even more, good for 2yrs worth of dealer changes. My car is due for the 1st OCI by mid Nov. I'd likely pull the trigger for 2 cases of the Mazda Moly by Thurs...

Btw, I have 12ltrs of Grp V Motul 0w40 8100 Ester E-Tech from my oil stash..too bad I can't use it. Way thick for the "watery" 0W20 needs for the Sky-G.
 

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The Motul Ester E-Tech is what I used in my '99 MB E320 4-Matic right up until it was totaled in 2008. That sucker had an 8.5 qt. crankcase, and required synthetic, as one would guess by the viscocity rating. It's formulated primarily for European gasoline engined vehicles.

ExB5, would you mind revealing your internet source for the $6.19 Mazda 0W-20 with Moly? It may be worth doing a 2 case deal, even though I have 16 quarts of the stuff on hand currently.

I've stockpiled oil in the past for a particular car only to have the car totaled, so I try not to get carried away unless the deal is hard to pass up.
Sorry, I meant $6.29/qt...not $6.19. Typo. :rolleyes:

It's from Partsvp.com. The lowest I've found anywhere.

$6.29 (Part # 0000G50W20MQ) Mazda GF-5 0W20 W/MOLY (QR
 
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Since running M1 0W20, I had not a drop to add as top off. I cannot say the same to the "watery thin" FF Mazda Moly 0W20 (both oils driven at same spirited 6MT driving and heavy foot). I monitor my oil levels every weekend.
 

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Some scholarly good read on molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) lubrication. Quite lengthy like...>140 pages. Take your time. :D

Molybdenum Disulphide Lubrication - A.R. Lansdown - Google Books

NASA uses it, jet aircraft applications, bullets, etc..even the Germans (originated/invented synthetic oils, due to lack of petrol resources to wage war then) way back in WWII used it on "Big Bertha".

The downside of Liqui-Moly MoS2 + M1 0W20..other than my engine is alot quieter now (no loud direct injection noise), smoother running and no syn oil consumption at all/no top-off since, not a drop added since first OCI, in spite of my "heavy foot" on the engine (all contrary to previously used Mazda Moly 0W20)?...(me, "skeptic" is my middle name ;) regarding "snake oils")

None.
 
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