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Discussion Starter #1
I’m having a bit of a quandary about whether to get specifically summer tires or all seasons . It looks like there’s no tread warranty at all for the summers from what Ive researched vs a 50,000 mile warranty for all seasons . Since I have dedicated snows is there any reason not to just go for the summers ? I don’t track my car but I do like to have fun in the corners . Would 25000 miles be a reasonable estimate for a softer summer tire ?
 

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Since you have a set of dedicated winters, I'd suggest going All-Seasons.

You can find some pretty nice "high performance" all seasons that won't kill you if it's raining out. I've had great luck with my Falkens.

That, and you won't have to worry about any freak snow-storms at odd times of the year if you haven't had a chance to swap to your winters yet.
 

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I've heard of dedicated summer tires lasting anywhere from 10K miles to 80K miles. It can vary from the tire construction itself, to your style of driving, and the types/conditions or roadways you drive on.

If you're looking for tires that'll more than likely last past 50K miles, then a high performance all-season tire is also what I'd recommend. I also have dedicated winter wheels/tires, but I still prefer a higher-performance all-season compared to a summer tire. They'll provide more than enough grip for day-to-day driving, and will still allow you to have a little fun on your favorite back road. Plus, there's that treadlife warranty, and the fact that you won't fear driving in light snow or temps lower than 45 degrees...
 

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I personally prefer, and own, a separate set of wheels/tires for winter and a set for summer, using summer performance tires. I drive pretty aggressive, at times, so I wanted to try a strict summer tire. They do a great job, but depending on how long they last will determine if I go with them again.

I've only put about 4,200 miles on the summer set, so I can't argue the longevity yet, but the tread is wearing nicely and still have a lot of meat left on them. 25,000 miles is about what I was thinking when I purchased my summer set, but time will tell.

But, like the two before me posted...if you're looking for a 50,000 mile tire, you'll probably want the all seasons.
 

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Michelin has made some great strides with tread life on their Pilot Super Sport and Pilot Sport 4's - I could easily see you getting 35-45k miles out of a set. Driving aggressively often, running higher speeds (80+), or driving in high heat will reduce the life though. I ran about 34k on my PSS's on my 6 - they would have lasted longer but I did not rotate them (bent rims in the back made rotating a tires-off affair, laziness prevailed), and my PSS's on my ATS are looking fantastic after about 17k. Other things to think about are tire noise and ride harshness (sidewall stiffness), which summer tires are usually worse on compared to a good all-season (although if you're going from factory Dunlops I can't imagine it's much worse lol).
 

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Unless your mazda is a strict "weekend only" car don't buy summer tires there's all season tires that perform just as good or even better then summer tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for all the replies , I think I’m either going to go with Bridgestones RE980AS or General Gmax 05 AS . I can get them close to my place and the Michelin’s are just too pricey for me . I read that the RE980AS is 5 lbs heavier a tire , is that really noticeable?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ordered the Bridgestones this morning , $195 CAN / tire at my local small tire shop .Looking forward to having some new rubber on those 19” Mazda beauty rims .
 

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Unless your mazda is a strict "weekend only" car don't buy summer tires there's all season tires that perform just as good or even better then summer tires.
Except when you need to stop quickly on wet pavement.

All-season tires are designed to retain water on the tread (that is how they can "stick" to light snow), which gives you a water-to-water interface when you are driving on wet pavement.

 

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Except when you need to stop quickly on wet pavement.

All-season tires are designed to retain water on the tread (that is how they can "stick" to light snow), which gives you a water-to-water interface when you are driving on wet pavement.

What kinda garbage is that?

Get an ultra performance All Season tires like the General G-Max AS-05 and you’ll be fine.

I just bought a set for my 2015 Mazda 6 and they are amazing in the wet.

Go to Tire-rack and watch their video review
 

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What kinda garbage is that?
It is fact-based. Your comment is ignorance-based. Note: unlike stupidity, ignorance can be cured; read on and you may find the path to a cure.

Get an ultra performance All Season tires like . . .
The phrase "ultra performance All Season tire" is an oxymoron, like "high quality garbage."

the General G-Max AS-05 and you’ll be fine.
Continental AG, the parent company of General Tire, makes some excellent tires. Continental's better tires bear the Continental brand; the General Tire line comprises Continental's lower grade tires; General tires are a more appropriate match for a Scion (Toyota's economy line) than for a Lexus (Toyota's premium line); I would not seek out General tires for a Mazda6. I certainly would not seek out an All Season tire for use in any area that sees rainy conditions a good portion of the year.

I spent a significant portion of my professional career as outside counsel (a lawyer who is not in-house as a part of the client's legal department; outside counsel are hired for expertise that the client perceives that the company's in-house lawyers are inadequate to address) for a very major tire retailer. A good business lawyer — and I was at the very top of my profession — gets to know his (or her) client's businesses better than the clients know themselves; that is the way a good lawyer gains client loyalty and has clients return again and again for more advice.

Among the open secrets within the tire industry is the knowledge that so-called All Season tires are significantly inferior to non-AS tires (there is no industry standard term for what marketing types deceptively call "summer tires") in wet traction (emergency braking on wet surfaces). Typically, an all-season tire will exhibit stopping distances as much as 40 percent longer than the stopping distances of an non-AS tire in emergency braking situations on wet pavement.

Consider, for a start, the following data points. Many tire makers make parallel offerings of popular tires in their line, a performance tire and an AS line, which often have similar tread patterns and similar advertising copy. However, invariably — you will not find an exception — the performance tire will be significantly more expensive than the AS tire, and, again without exception, the AS tire will have a significantly higher UTQG Treadwear grade than the parallel performance tire. Stop. Think about that: Why does the tire maker think (apparently correctly, else it would stop making the performance variant) that it can charge more for a tire that is going to wear out more quickly? Simplified answer: the expensive variant is targeted at the driver who is concerned with safety, while the AS variant is targeted at drivers who are cheap and will cut corners to save a few dollars.

EXAMPLE: The Nokian zLine tire, made by a Finnish company at a factory in Russia. which is one of the best tires that you can fit to a Mazda6. The street price per tire of one Nokian zLine tire in 215/50R 17XL size is $151, and the tire has a UTQG Treadwear grade of 300. The parallel Nokian zLine A/S tire, in the same size, 215/50R 17XL, has a street price of $104 (45 percent less per tire) and a UTQG Treadwear grade of 500 (60 percent greater per tire) . Why do knowledgeable purchasers (like me) willingly paying more for less wear? Because safety is my first concern when fitting tires to my car.

I just bought a set for my 2015 Mazda 6 and they are amazing in the wet.
"Amazing" is an interesting choice of word. If you live long enough, and drive a lot in varied circumstances, you will encounter a few occasions when every inch counts in your ability to stop. I first obtained my driver's license toward the end of the Eisenhower Administration, and have put more than 10,000 miles on the odometer almost every year since. Off hand, I can recall four instances when I experienced "amazing" wet-pavement performance from my tires:

  1. I was driving north in a drizzle on a freeway that was renamed the Major Deegan Expressway in the vicinity of Yankee Stadium on a light-traffic Sunday morning when, about 75 yards in front of me, an 18-wheeler got out of control and ended up under an overpass, wedged sideways, blocking all of the northbound lanes. I braked hard, simultaneously swerving toward the (narrow) right shoulder. Another driver, following me, apparently did not see the situation ahead as soon as I did, and he came around to my left, saw the truck just as he was passing me, and jammed on his brakes. He slammed into the trailer under the underpass; I ended up on the shoulder, and my vehicle was undamaged.
  2. I came around a large radius turn in the mountains here in Oregon to see that the entire roadway ahead had slid down the side of the hill (landslide), leaving a gaping chasm. I was able to stop, just barely, short of the edge. There is no doubt in my mind that, had I had your General G-Max AS tires on my car, the performance would have been "amazing," because I would have had to learn (in a hurry) how to fly the car without wings or ailerons. Yeah. Amazing.
  3. Early (3:30 or 4:00 a.m.) on a December morning here in Portland, I was giving a friend a ride to the airport to catch an early morning flight to the East Coast. Portland, December: yeah, it rains. Heading east on the Banfield (I-84) from downtown Portland, a truck came down an on-ramp ahead of me to get onto the freeway in my lane; it was a junk scavenger truck, with an cargo bay full (to the overflowing) with random pieces of scrap metal, discarded appliances, etc. As the truck merged into my lane, a length of angle iron, about 6 feet long and 8-10 inches across, fell off the top of the pile at the back of the truck, and landed, end on, on the pavement ahead of me, whence it bounced about ten feet back up into the air. Had I not taken my foot off the accelerator when first I saw the truck merging onto the freeway, that piece of iron would have passed through my windshield and neatly skewered me; as it was, I was only two to three car lengths behind the truck, barely enough space for me to execute an emergency maneuver and go around the left side of the truck. As you may guess from the length and detail of this message, I am a fanatic about the quality of the tires that I fit to our Mazda6, and, because my tires gave me full control, I executed the maneuver quickly and deftly. I seriously doubt that I would have been able to do so had I had your economy General AS tires on my Mazda6.
  4. We were tooling along at about 45mph on a paved Forest Service road south of Mt. St. Helens in the early 1970s when a motorcyclist (who I assume had gone off the road to take a pee behind a tree), without looking, manually pushed his bike onto the road. I slammed the brakes on hard and they locked (I was driving a Saab 99 at the time, manufactured before the invention of ABS); the car ended up facing sideways, with my driver's door closest to the motorcycle, but when I say "closest," I mean between 6 inches and a foot from the guy's left elbow. There is no substitute for stopping power.
Go to Tire-rack and watch their video review
TireRack is an interesting case (they sold fewer tires than my client did, if that matters). I have purchased tires from TireRack myself in the past, and the website presents an interesting reference point even if one purchases tires elsewhere. Their group tests, in particular, usually featuring four or five tires of the same size, fitted to the same vehicle, tested under the same conditions on the same day by the same testers, are especially interesting. Do not try to compare numerical results between two test groups, however, because (as you will find if you pay attention) there can be a very wide variance between the test results for a specific test of the same model and size of a brand of tire from grouping to grouping, presumably due to different weather conditions, different vehicles, and different testers. Look at each group test as a universe of its own, and the results are more worthy of reliance.

I trust that TireRack is not dishonest; I think that it does not fudge results. That said, however, when you get away from the comparison tests with hard data, the copy on the site gets squirrelly. According to the individual tire descriptions, every tire that TireRack sells on its site is better than every other tire that TireRack sells on its site. There are only wonderful tires and better-than-wonderful tires and even-better-than-that tires for sale there; there is no paucity of superlatives.

Moreover, there are some very misleading and potentially dangerous statements on the site. Apparently, there is a macro that TireRack has programmed into every keyboard at the company that says that what TireRack calls a "summer" tire (see above) should not be driven in sub-freezing conditions on dry roads.

Here is the deception in that statement: every rubber compound in every tire gets softer as the tire gets hotter, and gets harder as the tire gets colder. At a very moderate temperature, say 50° F., the tread compound of almost every all-season tire is harder than the tread compound of most general purpose (non-AS) tires; compounding the tread to be hard is one of the techniques that confers long tread life, which is an important consideration for customers for whom cheap-cheap-cheap is the first buying consideration; and basically that is the target audience for all-season tires. The countervailing consideration is that, the harder the tread compound, generally the poorer the traction (braking distance) a tire will have.

It would be possible to make tires with UTQG Treadwear gradings into the thousands if the steel belts in the tires were a bit thicker, and were on the outside of the tire, but the tires would be noisy, would not ride very well, and (most importantly for our discussion) would not brake well. OTOH, a tire with a tread compound that was soft like an art gum eraser would be terrific at braking, but you would have to change out your tires after every hard stop. Most of the cars at the Indy 500 (which hardly have the brakes applied at all), undergo a tire swap during the race, and that is for a race only 500 miles long.

Now, although there are some differences in the breadth of the range within which tires are at a "good" softness/hardness, a tire with a tread compound that is harder at 50° (for instance, all-season) also will be harder at freezing (32°) temperature; and a tire with a tread compound that is softer at 50° (non-AS) will still have a softer tread compound at 32° than the all-season tire; consequently the non-all-season tire usually exhibits better braking traction and handling, than a typical AS tire at temperatures near freezing.

Finally — and this is a whole can of worms that needs a separate thread of its own — unless NHTSA recently has amended the UTQG testing protocol for Traction, which relates specifically to wet braking, since last I checked — is completely irrelevant for cars equipped with antilock braking systems (ABS) — that is, most modern cars — and all Mazda6's. The test procedure specifies that the tester throw a chuck into the wheel of a trailer on which the tire under test is mounted, in order to lock the wheel and tire instantly and to completely stop rotation. The entire function of ABS is to prevent wheel lock, and it instantly releases the vehicle's braking on that wheel until the wheel resumes rotation; so the UTQG Traction tests specifically in a condition (locked wheel) that never should occur at all in a modern vehicle.
 

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Need Tires for my 2014 Mazda 6 Sport 17"

It is fact-based. Your comment is ignorance-based. Note: unlike stupidity, ignorance can be cured; read on and you may find the path to a cure.


The phrase "ultra performance All Season tire" is an oxymoron, like "high quality garbage."



Continental AG, the parent company of General Tire, makes some excellent tires. Continental's better tires bear the Continental brand; the General Tire line comprises Continental's lower grade tires; General tires are a more appropriate match for a Scion (Toyota's economy line) than for a Lexus (Toyota's premium line); I would not seek out General tires for a Mazda6. I certainly would not seek out an All Season tire for use in any area that sees rainy conditions a good portion of the year.

I spent a significant portion of my professional career as outside counsel (a lawyer who is not in-house as a part of the client's legal department; outside counsel are hired for expertise that the client perceives that the company's in-house lawyers are inadequate to address) for a very major tire retailer. A good business lawyer — and I was at the very top of my profession — gets to know his (or her) client's businesses better than the clients know themselves; that is the way a good lawyer gains client loyalty and has clients return again and again for more advice.

Among the open secrets within the tire industry is the knowledge that so-called All Season tires are significantly inferior to non-AS tires (there is no industry standard term for what marketing types deceptively call "summer tires") in wet traction (emergency braking on wet surfaces). Typically, an all-season tire will exhibit stopping distances as much as 40 percent longer than the stopping distances of an non-AS tire in emergency braking situations on wet pavement.

Consider, for a start, the following data points. Many tire makers make parallel offerings of popular tires in their line, a performance tire and an AS line, which often have similar tread patterns and similar advertising copy. However, invariably — you will not find an exception — the performance tire will be significantly more expensive than the AS tire, and, again without exception, the AS tire will have a significantly higher UTQG Treadwear grade than the parallel performance tire. Stop. Think about that: Why does the tire maker think (apparently correctly, else it would stop making the performance variant) that it can charge more for a tire that is going to wear out more quickly? Simplified answer: the expensive variant is targeted at the driver who is concerned with safety, while the AS variant is targeted at drivers who are cheap and will cut corners to save a few dollars.

EXAMPLE: The Nokian zLine tire, made by a Finnish company at a factory in Russia. which is one of the best tires that you can fit to a Mazda6. The street price per tire of one Nokian zLine tire in 215/50R 17XL size is $151, and the tire has a UTQG Treadwear grade of 300. The parallel Nokian zLine A/S tire, in the same size, 215/50R 17XL, has a street price of $104 (45 percent less per tire) and a UTQG Treadwear grade of 500 (60 percent greater per tire) . Why do knowledgeable purchasers (like me) willingly paying more for less wear? Because safety is my first concern when fitting tires to my car.



"Amazing" is an interesting choice of word. If you live long enough, and drive a lot in varied circumstances, you will encounter a few occasions when every inch counts in your ability to stop. I first obtained my driver's license toward the end of the Eisenhower Administration, and have put more than 10,000 miles on the odometer almost every year since. Off hand, I can recall four instances when I experienced "amazing" wet-pavement performance from my tires:

  1. I was driving north in a drizzle on a freeway that was renamed the Major Deegan Expressway in the vicinity of Yankee Stadium on a light-traffic Sunday morning when, about 75 yards in front of me, an 18-wheeler got out of control and ended up under an overpass, wedged sideways, blocking all of the northbound lanes. I braked hard, simultaneously swerving toward the (narrow) right shoulder. Another driver, following me, apparently did not see the situation ahead as soon as I did, and he came around to my left, saw the truck just as he was passing me, and jammed on his brakes. He slammed into the trailer under the underpass; I ended up on the shoulder, and my vehicle was undamaged.
  2. I came around a large radius turn in the mountains here in Oregon to see that the entire roadway ahead had slid down the side of the hill (landslide), leaving a gaping chasm. I was able to stop, just barely, short of the edge. There is no doubt in my mind that, had I had your General G-Max AS tires on my car, the performance would have been "amazing," because I would have had to learn (in a hurry) how to fly the car without wings or ailerons. Yeah. Amazing.
  3. Early (3:30 or 4:00 a.m.) on a December morning here in Portland, I was giving a friend a ride to the airport to catch an early morning flight to the East Coast. Portland, December: yeah, it rains. Heading east on the Banfield (I-84) from downtown Portland, a truck came down an on-ramp ahead of me to get onto the freeway in my lane; it was a junk scavenger truck, with an cargo bay full (to the overflowing) with random pieces of scrap metal, discarded appliances, etc. As the truck merged into my lane, a length of angle iron, about 6 feet long and 8-10 inches across, fell off the top of the pile at the back of the truck, and landed, end on, on the pavement ahead of me, whence it bounced about ten feet back up into the air. Had I not taken my foot off the accelerator when first I saw the truck merging onto the freeway, that piece of iron would have passed through my windshield and neatly skewered me; as it was, I was only two to three car lengths behind the truck, barely enough space for me to execute an emergency maneuver and go around the left side of the truck. As you may guess from the length and detail of this message, I am a fanatic about the quality of the tires that I fit to our Mazda6, and, because my tires gave me full control, I executed the maneuver quickly and deftly. I seriously doubt that I would have been able to do so had I had your economy General AS tires on my Mazda6.
  4. We were tooling along at about 45mph on a paved Forest Service road south of Mt. St. Helens in the early 1970s when a motorcyclist (who I assume had gone off the road to take a pee behind a tree), without looking, manually pushed his bike onto the road. I slammed the brakes on hard and they locked (I was driving a Saab 99 at the time, manufactured before the invention of ABS); the car ended up facing sideways, with my driver's door closest to the motorcycle, but when I say "closest," I mean between 6 inches and a foot from the guy's left elbow. There is no substitute for stopping power.
TireRack is an interesting case (they sold fewer tires than my client did, if that matters). I have purchased tires from TireRack myself in the past, and the website presents an interesting reference point even if one purchases tires elsewhere. Their group tests, in particular, usually featuring four or five tires of the same size, fitted to the same vehicle, tested under the same conditions on the same day by the same testers, are especially interesting. Do not try to compare numerical results between two test groups, however, because (as you will find if you pay attention) there can be a very wide variance between the test results for a specific test of the same model and size of a brand of tire from grouping to grouping, presumably due to different weather conditions, different vehicles, and different testers. Look at each group test as a universe of its own, and the results are more worthy of reliance.

I trust that TireRack is not dishonest; I think that it does not fudge results. That said, however, when you get away from the comparison tests with hard data, the copy on the site gets squirrelly. According to the individual tire descriptions, every tire that TireRack sells on its site is better than every other tire that TireRack sells on its site. There are only wonderful tires and better-than-wonderful tires and even-better-than-that tires for sale there; there is no paucity of superlatives.

Moreover, there are some very misleading and potentially dangerous statements on the site. Apparently, there is a macro that TireRack has programmed into every keyboard at the company that says that what TireRack calls a "summer" tire (see above) should not be driven in sub-freezing conditions on dry roads.

Here is the deception in that statement: every rubber compound in every tire gets softer as the tire gets hotter, and gets harder as the tire gets colder. At a very moderate temperature, say 50° F., the tread compound of almost every all-season tire is harder than the tread compound of most general purpose (non-AS) tires; compounding the tread to be hard is one of the techniques that confers long tread life, which is an important consideration for customers for whom cheap-cheap-cheap is the first buying consideration; and basically that is the target audience for all-season tires. The countervailing consideration is that, the harder the tread compound, generally the poorer the traction (braking distance) a tire will have.

It would be possible to make tires with UTQG Treadwear gradings into the thousands if the steel belts in the tires were a bit thicker, and were on the outside of the tire, but the tires would be noisy, would not ride very well, and (most importantly for our discussion) would not brake well. OTOH, a tire with a tread compound that was soft like an art gum eraser would be terrific at braking, but you would have to change out your tires after every hard stop. Most of the cars at the Indy 500 (which hardly have the brakes applied at all), undergo a tire swap during the race, and that is for a race only 500 miles long.

Now, although there are some differences in the breadth of the range within which tires are at a "good" softness/hardness, a tire with a tread compound that is harder at 50° (for instance, all-season) also will be harder at freezing (32°) temperature; and a tire with a tread compound that is softer at 50° (non-AS) will still have a softer tread compound at 32° than the all-season tire; consequently the non-all-season tire usually exhibits better braking traction and handling, than a typical AS tire at temperatures near freezing.

Finally — and this is a whole can of worms that needs a separate thread of its own — unless NHTSA recently has amended the UTQG testing protocol for Traction, which relates specifically to wet braking, since last I checked — is completely irrelevant for cars equipped with antilock braking systems (ABS) — that is, most modern cars — and all Mazda6's. The test procedure specifies that the tester throw a chuck into the wheel of a trailer on which the tire under test is mounted, in order to lock the wheel and tire instantly and to completely stop rotation. The entire function of ABS is to prevent wheel lock, and it instantly releases the vehicle's braking on that wheel until the wheel resumes rotation; so the UTQG Traction tests specifically in a condition (locked wheel) that never should occur at all in a modern vehicle.

Posttosh, I tried to send you a private msg, but your stored msgs are full, so could not do. What tires do you run on your Mazda 6?
 

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This has turned into a “passionate” discussion on tires; so I’ll weigh in with my “opinion”. I’d like to start off by saying that a majority of Mazda owners that are members of the Mazda6 and Mazda3 forums consistently trash the OEM Dunlops. I live in Houston, it doesn’t snow here but I do drive up to the Midwest (Saint Louis) for the Christmas holiday. Oh yes, and it rains here. Coming from Connecticut in 1990, I’m talking about monsoon type rain where getting an inch of rain in an hour happens a lot. An inch in 15 minutes also happens several times a year as well as five to eight inches in a day! And don’t forget biblical rain from tropical storms and hurricanes! So why the back ground?

The stock Dunlops were scary in “Houston” rain storms, but in the dry, they were perfectly adequate OEM tire. So how you drive and where you live should play a big decision in your tire choice. Of course price, treadwear and the amount of miles you drive a year are also typical decision factors in a tire purchase. I do believe the Tire Rack has a reliable and large base of consumers that participle in their surveys. I use them as a decision maker when looking for tires and I also strongly consider the “Would you recommend” field. For me that field is similar to Car & Driver’s “Fun to drive” field, an overall objective score. By the way, the Generals have the highest mark (8.6) in this category, higher than the Pilot Sport A/S 3+ and the highly touted Continental Extreme Contact DWS tires.

With that being said, I purchased the General G-MAX AS-05s for my Mazda and have about 12,000 miles on them running 38/37PSI. I also have the BFG G-Force COMP-2 A/S on my wife’s pristine (55,000 mile) 2007 V6 automatic Accord EX-L coupe running 35/32PSI. My Mazda is stock; the Accord has an upgraded (14MM -> 17MM) rear sway bar which eliminates a large amount of the inherent factory under-steer. Both of these tires compete in the Ultra High Performance All-Season category against the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+. This is a modern category that was simply not available 10 years ago with the level of performance they are able to deliver today and are a great match for the our cars and the type of driving and conditions I drive in. If I lived in a colder climate, I would most likely have a second set of winter tires or would have dropped down a category to Grand Touring All-Season tires.

Anyway, I’m very happy with both of the tires that I’ve selected. I agree with the Tire Racks Consumer Survey Stats as written for both these tires. The BFGs are a more aggressive higher performance tire, the Generals are quieter. My wife’s Accords tires are replaced on time not miles, the last set being General Exclaim UHP. I ran General G-MAX AS-03s on my 2007 V6 6-speed Accord sedan. The Generals, as with most higher performance tires are getting better with every generation. There are several good choices in this category. I believe if you make your decision based upon the conditions I noted above you’ll be happy. Hope that helps!
 

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tt

Posttosh, I tried to send you a private msg, but your stored msgs are full, so could not do. What tires do you run on your Mazda 6?
Yes: the last time I posted a PM on this forum — years ago — there was VERY ample space there; then the ownership of the forum changed hands, and the capacity of my mailbox was shrunk down by something more than 3/4 to only the messages that were already in the box. That turned me off so completely, I stopped participating in the forum at all and lost all interest in even reading any messages in the forum. I guess I should have just stayed away.

I currently run Nokian zLine tires, the full capability (not the A/S) line, on my Mazda6.

[Ten days or two weeks ago, my front brakes wore down to their audible indicator strips, and, although I have purchased replacement rotors (Raybestos part 980288FZN, Advanced Technology: the -FZN suffix designates the Rust Prevention Technology coated version) and pads (Hawk HPS 5.0), and am waiting for my mechanic to have an opening when I can have them mounted; in the meantime, I am avoiding high speed driving, and consequently I shall miss the DeGoode Tulip Farm meet-up this weekend.]
 

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This has turned into a “passionate” discussion on tires; so I’ll weigh in with my “opinion”. I’d like to start off by saying that a majority of Mazda owners that are members of the Mazda6 and Mazda3 forums consistently trash the OEM Dunlops. I live in Houston, it doesn’t snow here but I do drive up to the Midwest (Saint Louis) for the Christmas holiday. Oh yes, and it rains here. Coming from Connecticut in 1990, I’m talking about monsoon type rain where getting an inch of rain in an hour happens a lot. An inch in 15 minutes also happens several times a year as well as five to eight inches in a day! And don’t forget biblical rain from tropical storms and hurricanes! So why the back ground?

The stock Dunlops were scary in “Houston” rain storms, but in the dry, they were perfectly adequate OEM tire. So how you drive and where you live should play a big decision in your tire choice. Of course price, treadwear and the amount of miles you drive a year are also typical decision factors in a tire purchase. I do believe the Tire Rack has a reliable and large base of consumers that participle in their surveys. I use them as a decision maker when looking for tires and I also strongly consider the “Would you recommend” field. For me that field is similar to Car & Driver’s “Fun to drive” field, an overall objective score. By the way, the Generals have the highest mark (8.6) in this category, higher than the Pilot Sport A/S 3+ and the highly touted Continental Extreme Contact DWS tires.

With that being said, I purchased the General G-MAX AS-05s for my Mazda and have about 12,000 miles on them running 38/37PSI. I also have the BFG G-Force COMP-2 A/S on my wife’s pristine (55,000 mile) 2007 V6 automatic Accord EX-L coupe running 35/32PSI. My Mazda is stock; the Accord has an upgraded (14MM -> 17MM) rear sway bar which eliminates a large amount of the inherent factory under-steer. Both of these tires compete in the Ultra High Performance All-Season category against the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+. This is a modern category that was simply not available 10 years ago with the level of performance they are able to deliver today and are a great match for the our cars and the type of driving and conditions I drive in. If I lived in a colder climate, I would most likely have a second set of winter tires or would have dropped down a category to Grand Touring All-Season tires.

Anyway, I’m very happy with both of the tires that I’ve selected. I agree with the Tire Racks Consumer Survey Stats as written for both these tires. The BFGs are a more aggressive higher performance tire, the Generals are quieter. My wife’s Accords tires are replaced on time not miles, the last set being General Exclaim UHP. I ran General G-MAX AS-03s on my 2007 V6 6-speed Accord sedan. The Generals, as with most higher performance tires are getting better with every generation. There are several good choices in this category. I believe if you make your decision based upon the conditions I noted above you’ll be happy. Hope that helps!
Thanks for the write-up. Much appreciated.

Between the Generals and BFGs, which one do YOU prefer?
 

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Thanks for the write-up. Much appreciated.

Between the Generals and BFGs, which one do YOU prefer?
I've heard some say the BFGs get LOUD as they rack up the mileage. This is a non-issue in my Wife's Accord as it's NOT a highway commuter. Given that, if I lived in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio or the Mark Twain forest area of Missouri, two places I've driven in, the BFGs with a rear swaybar. For a mostly fun daily drive that racks up the miles, the Generals.
 

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I've heard some say the BFGs get LOUD as they rack up the mileage. This is a non-issue in my Wife's Accord as it's NOT a highway commuter. Given that, if I lived in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio or the Mark Twain forest area of Missouri, two places I've driven in, the BFGs with a rear swaybar. For a mostly fun daily drive that racks up the miles, the Generals.



Brian, Thanks for all the info.:smile2:
 

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Yes: the last time I posted a PM on this forum — years ago — there was VERY ample space there; then the ownership of the forum changed hands, and the capacity of my mailbox was shrunk down by something more than 3/4 to only the messages that were already in the box. That turned me off so completely, I stopped participating in the forum at all and lost all interest in even reading any messages in the forum. I guess I should have just stayed away.

I currently run Nokian zLine tires, the full capability (not the A/S) line, on my Mazda6.

[Ten days or two weeks ago, my front brakes wore down to their audible indicator strips, and, although I have purchased replacement rotors (Raybestos part 980288FZN, Advanced Technology: the -FZN suffix designates the Rust Prevention Technology coated version) and pads (Hawk HPS 5.0), and am waiting for my mechanic to have an opening when I can have them mounted; in the meantime, I am avoiding high speed driving, and consequently I shall miss the DeGoode Tulip Farm meet-up this weekend.]



Thanks for the info, sorry to hear you are turned off to the forum, as I have found some good info on it.:|
 

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I've heard some say the BFGs get LOUD as they rack up the mileage. This is a non-issue in my Wife's Accord as it's NOT a highway commuter. Given that, if I lived in the Hocking Hills area of Ohio or the Mark Twain forest area of Missouri, two places I've driven in, the BFGs with a rear swaybar. For a mostly fun daily drive that racks up the miles, the Generals.
That would be me.

And yes, they do. Their wet traction also goes to hell long before their tread is anywhere near wear bars.

With that said for the money they're not bad. But the Douglas Performance tires outlasted them, are comparable in traction when new, were quieter and while their wet performance degraded as they wore too they kept more of their original wet grip than the BFGs did.

Oh, and they're cheaper. By quite a bit.

I'm now on my second set of the Douglas Performance tires..... If the Douglas tires weren't available I'd probably have gone for the BFGs again but on a straight-up comparison when you get comparable performance, as-good to better service life and they're quieter for materially less money? That one's easy, never mind that I can get one replaced darn near anywhere in the US within a 20 mile drive should I manage to damage one with some sort of road debris.
 

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I live in Houston, it doesn’t snow here but I do drive up to the Midwest (Saint Louis) for the Christmas holiday. Oh yes, and it rains here. Coming from Connecticut in 1990, I’m talking about monsoon type rain where getting an inch of rain in an hour happens a lot. An inch in 15 minutes also happens several times a year as well as five to eight inches in a day! And don’t forget biblical rain from tropical storms and hurricanes!

I do believe the Tire Rack has a reliable and large base of consumers that participle in their surveys. I use them as a decision maker when looking for tires ...

With that being said, I purchased the General G-MAX AS-05s for my Mazda and have about 12,000 miles on them running 38/37PSI.

... these tires compete in the Ultra High Performance All-Season category
. I agree with the Tire Racks Consumer Survey Stats as written for both these tires.

There are several good choices in this category. I believe if you make your decision based upon the conditions I noted above you’ll be happy. Hope that helps!
I regard the consumer reviews and consumer surveys at Tire Rack, which generally have the characteristics that suggest that they are mostly the product of 'bots, to be all-but-worthless.

Brian, you stand on the shoulders of a giant. His name was Ettore Bugatti; yes, THE Bugatti, whose namesake automobiles are among the fastest in the world even in 2019. When it was observed that brakes were practically non-existent on his cars, Bugatti replied:
Ettore Bugatti said:
I make cars to go. Not to stop.
source URL: Ettore Bugatti Quotes

Fitting all-season tires to drive in the Houston weather that you describe suggests that you are Bugatti's spiritual landsman. :smile2:
 
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