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Hello, I am driving the 2.2 diesel 6 from 2010 with 85000miles on the clock. It is due a service in June. I have started to get a small oil leak at the front of the engine and I have noticed a burning rubber smell coming from the exhaust. Would anyone have any ideas regarding this. Would it relate to anything at this service interval - a seal for example.
The car is well looked after and serviced regularly.
Thanks very much...
 

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I suggest you look all over the engine bay to see the source of the leaking oil. Is your car equiped with hydraulic power steering? That is another source of oil leak.

I will worry if the oil is coming from the sump tank. You don't want to run the engine without oil. The same goes for the transmission.
 

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I can only tell that spotting of oil appears on the ground from the front left/passenger side of the engine somewhere.. I cannot see anything except for the oil on the tray under the car. I dip the oil every two days and there is no change on the dip stick.
Thank you very much and I appreciate your info.. Cheers!
 

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I can only tell that spotting of oil appears on the ground from the front left/passenger side of the engine somewhere.. I cannot see anything except for the oil on the tray under the car. I dip the oil every two days and there is no change on the dip stick.
Thank you very much and I appreciate your info.. Cheers!
I say pull the tray off and take a look. You may need to wipe it down and check after a day as wind tends to blow everything everywhere.
You could try putting some on a white towel to see the color. Sometimes that will help distinguish between engine and power steering oils.
 

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I say pull the tray off and take a look. You may need to wipe it down and check after a day as wind tends to blow everything everywhere.
You could try putting some on a white towel to see the color. Sometimes that will help distinguish between engine and power steering oils.
This is the reason why I diligently clean and maintain the cleanliness of my old car, to easily spot any leak.

240055


It is expected for an old car like mine to have failing parts. One time I saw "dirt" all around the left side. It was grease and it was coming from the sealed bearing or from the rubber boots or whatever it is called. Anyways, I was able to spot a future problem because I had the shop check it.
 

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I just did this for a client's vehicle not too long ago.

Take a little time to visually inspect and clean any oil/grease you see. Make note of locations.

Get some UV Dye and a UV flashlight kit. Add to one suspected system at a time. Don't go crazy w/it. It doesn't take much. Read the instruction. Found the source after 10 minute of driving..

Please note there are different types of dye for different fluids. Don't mix it up

They make different color dyes. ie, use one color for engine oil, and another color for others..



a very small pin hole leak that was near impossible to detect due to all the road grim and grease of a 18year old vehicle.. UV dye was very direct. Definitely a time saver.
 

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I
I just did this for a client's vehicle not too long ago.

Take a little time to visually inspect and clean any oil/grease you see. Make note of locations.

Get some UV Dye and a UV flashlight kit. Add to one suspected system at a time. Don't go crazy w/it. It doesn't take much. Read the instruction. Found the source after 10 minute of driving..

Please note there are different types of dye for different fluids. Don't mix it up

They make different color dyes. ie, use one color for engine oil, and another color for others..



a very small pin hole leak that was near impossible to detect due to all the road grim and grease of a 18year old vehicle.. UV dye was very direct. Definitely a time saver.
I've heard of a refrigerant dye but not an oil dye, an engine oil dye. if I may ask, how do you use it? You pour it in the engine and it will mix to your engine oil?
 

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Yes. You simply add a few milliliter of dye into the system. Let the system run as normal to cycle the fluid around and periodically check w/UV light.

  • Initial inspection. Make note of possible leak(s) locations
  • Cleanup oil/grease/grime where you can
  • Add a small amount into the suspected leaky system. Read the instruction. Some dye require only a very small amount to be effective. Certain dyes can be relatively expensive. ie, 30mL = $10-15
  • Turn on system to circulate the fluids. Usually a short duration drive should do the trick.
  • Use a UV light to reinspect all area.
HINT if you beforehand apply a small drop of dye/oil mixture to a napkin or some surface outside the vehicle's system.. you can use that as a reference to what you should be looking for. 👍*
  • Repair the leak(s)
  • Clean the area of the leak and any residual dye on the surfaces
  • Road test the vehicle again and reinspect for additional leaks, if any.
Higher quality dyes doesn’t require ‘special’ tinted glasses to see and can be seen in natural daylight w/help of UV light. Some dye may require a darken room/enviroment to better see it's illumination under UV. If the dye recommend those tinted eye-wear.. use it. it'll help isolate the differences.

There are various dyes for specific fluid. Commonly available types are combustion engine oil, transmission oil, various types of coolant and refrigeration dyes, hydraulic, JP5, gasoline/diesel fuel..

There is a “multi-purpose” oil dye that are usually available at auto part stores.. they work but their brightness under UV light is lacking. Takes a little bit more effort to verify since a lot of them will glow almost the same as some plastics.. 😪


There's even a special dye for a smoke machine to help detect very minute air leaks..





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