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just wondering all u 6 owners....did u running in ur 6? and how? when did u first change the oil?

thanks!!

:p :p :p
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

I changed over to synthetic at about 2000 miles. I also swaped out the tranny fluid for some more high performance stuff at the same time. Well worth the ~$100
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

Does the tranny fluid make a difference?

During the break-in, don't press the gas pedal more than half way. Try not to run the engine too hard. Try at all times to vary your RPMs between 2000 and 3000 RPMs- meaning you need to shift a lot to help vary the revs- and try to stay off the highway.
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

Did as Stretchsje said. Also almost all new cars in Sweden hava a service right after you bought it. THen they check so everything works, changes oil and such. For the M6 the serivce is at 1000km.
 

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QUOTE
Although there is debate whether or not this is necessary...[/b]
No debating- it is. All modern cars I know of still recommend it in the owner's manual. Some (Toyota Avalon- a near luxury car) say not to take the car over 55mph over the first 1000 miles! Mazda simply asks to change speed often for the first 600 miles.

Nowadays, it's the difference between a 150,000 mile engine and a 250,000 mile one- engines seem to hold up pretty well. Perhaps more importantly, a properly broken in engine will make more power and get better mileage.
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

I generally take it easy because I am not out to prove my car in any way shape or form (forum?:D) any more.

But I got all over it after 1000miles and I like what I got back. :D
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

Yeah, no kidding- the difference in the '6 after break-in is greater than any other car I've been in.
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

Actually, the Mazda6 does not demand any breaking-in. Nor does most modern cars, I might add.

What IS specified in the owners manual, though, is that it is NOT recommended to drive the car long distances at the same speed. It needs to be revved high and low.

Actually, with the electronics in most cars they can programme the car not to allow you to take all the power out of it for a specified amount of miles. This I suspect is done by many makers, giving you a feeling that once broken in it gets more power. But that's just a programming thing...
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

I definitely agree it has more power after it's broken in. I will admit I opened it up before 600 miles....power was ok. Then I floored it after 1,000 miles...the engine revved so hard and fast that it ran straight to the rev limiter and had to get shut off by the rev limiter. Truly amazing, never had an automatic do that, so..either the computer is too slow, or the engine has some power...I'd like to think it's the latter.
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

I would think that the break in on a car and a motorcycle are somewhat the same. I bought a brand new GSXR600 last summer and the manual said not to take it above a certain RPM (I think 7000) for the first 700 miles, then it had a second tier of slightly higher RPMs til 1000 miles or something. It also stating that you should vary the RPMs.
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

so the question is... what happens if you do drive at the same revs over long distances? what's it do to the engine? does the car ever stop 'breaking in'?
 

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Originally posted by Rainchild


            so the question is... what happens if you do drive at the same revs over long distances?  what's it do to the engine?  does the car ever stop 'breaking in'?[/b]
Numerous posts on this forum have proposed various breakin theories and methods. Those theories/methods mentioned are the same as those practiced since I was an owner of a 1963 Oldsmobile Jetfire (alchohol/water injected, turbocharged, 215 cu.in, 290 hp); followed by a '66 GTO, tripower. "Breaking in" is really a misnomer for a process wherein the bearing surfaces have an initial period of increased wear as the opposing surfaces 'lap in' to each other.

There are two desirable goals of this 'lapping in' period: (1) The creation of a bearing system with uniform surfaces, lubrication gaps, and distribution of pressure, and (2) the production of a hardened surface on the load bearing metal. In both cases, the quality of the resulting load bearing surface ultimately determines the projected life of the engine.

The question becomes: How is the production of a unifom and hard surface produced? Metal will work harden if the microscopic flexing or pressure on its surface is applied at a level that realigns the metal molecules (packs them into a denser surface) but not at a level that abraids the bearing surface. In other words, light and gentle stress over time. As the bearing is stressed, the metal on the surface is gently pounded into a super hard structure backed by a more flexible and softer layer that cushions the impacts and flexure of the thin hardened structure. So, part of the answer is to patiently take it easy with your engine. My GTO, with enough instantaneous power to cause whiplash, was given the ultimate breakin of 10,000 miles with a gradual increase in the maximum RPM and accelleration rate. Even though I only had a 3.23 rear end, it was consistently stronger than the draggers who opted for a 3.55, 3.90, or 4.11 rear end. They goosed their Goats early in life and paid for it with worn bearings and (see the next paragraph) inconsistent power bands. It was hard being gentle, but the resulting car was strong, idled perfectly, and had no sags in its torque curve.

The next paragraph: Varying speed. This good. Very good. The problem, again, is to work harden the bearing uniformly. Engines are cyclical entities and oscillating elements (Pistons, cam followers, valves, gears, etc.). The pressure distribution curve on a piston crankshaft bearing at a particular RPM is different from the pattern at another RPM. During the early stages of lapping in a bearing the trick is to vary the rpm such that the high pressure patterns on the metal surfaces do not remain in the same spot during a period of use before the bearing has reached its maximum surface hardness. So, the solution is to simply vary your cruising speed every few minutes. Go 55, then 63, then 58, then..... The result will be a uniformly hardened bearing surface with no egg shaped wear.

So, what does this all mean. Simply, to take it easy for the first few thousand miles, vary your speed, don't floor the car, keep the RPMs low at the start and raise the stress slowly over time to prevent an undesirable wear pattern to the bearing surfaces. I know it will be hard, it was for me, but the results are a car that, because of the care given early in life, will reward its owner with extended performance far beyond that which would be experienced by a vehicle with abused young bearings. The careful treatment received will result in an engine that later can take easily take full power abuse with no risk of damage, and, because of its perfect bearing shape, will waste less energy in the form of heat (friction).

OH, yes, one more thing. "...does a car ever stop breaking in?" Breaking in is the production of a perfect bearing surface. Wearing out is the destruction of that bearing. If it is 'broken in " properly, the hardened bearing will present a far lower rate of metal loss than that experienced by the bearing that is stressed from the start and never develops the perfect work hardened surface. Of course, we haven't discussed oil quality, a high factor in engine wear. Only synthetic goes in my car....

Now, which color of 6 should I buy....?

LG
 

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Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

Wowee!! Great post and welcome aboard!

What is the source of this wealth of information? Is it a result of your profession?
 

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Reading Topic: Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

Excellent post, LG, I appreciate it! As a materials engineer, I always wanted that question answered properly, without "witch-oil" responses.

Thanks again.

-Alt
 

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QUOTE
Originally posted by LGilbert
            so the question is... .
Now, which color of 6 should I buy....?
                     [/b]
I love thoughtful answers. You must be one of those mech engineers? Anyhow keep good replies coming in. Cheers,
 

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Reading Topic: Reading Topic: Running-in (Break-in)

So the main thing is that you vary the RPM even just slightly? +/- 500rpm? I guess the hard part is keeping within the speed limit and not pissing off drivers behind you by going too slow. :)

I've got 2500km's on the clock now, so I guess it's too late to go back and do it properly if I did it wrong, but I've been driving gently-ish (first 500kms 0-3000rpm, then 0-4000rpm, never above 5000rpm before the first service)... then went on a long drive (~750kms) which a lot was just the same speed all the way (freeway driving with cruise control).

The first 1000kms were done in a fairly hilly city, so there'd be a fair amount of RPM variance due to hills, but probably also a lot of idling at traffic lights, creeping forward in rush-hour traffic, etc. Would it have been better for me to vary the revs in neutral at the lights too?

I guess this is knowledge I'd like for future cars (and hopefully peace of mind :p); plus for people who're wondering how is best to break in their new M6.

Thanks for the great answers LG.

-- Rainchild
 

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Replying to Topic 'Running-in (Break-in)'

I prefer running it hard for the break-in method. My last brand new car I had was a 1997 Honda Civic DX with like 10 miles on it. Ran it hard, making sure to vary the RPM's. I actually redlined it in 2nd gear with full throttle and coasted it down with throttle closed so that the vacuum pressure puts loads on the piston rings to seat them properly. Did that 5 times. After that drove normally until the 1st oil change. Raced some Civic EX's riced and stock ones which were higher models with supposedly more rated HP than my model. Beat them. I later sold the Civic with better than average compression with 133,000 miles.

Car and Driver or MotorTrend did a article in this months issue on AMG. They handbuild motors for mercedes. The magazine stated that right after they were done building the engine, they connected the engine to a dyno, warmed it up briefly and did a full pull to redline to make sure HP is within AMG's rated specs. If not within HP spec than the tech that built the motor would have to tear it down and rebuild it. For some reason this particular motor the magazine was looking at pulled 1HP more than spec.

I'll try and find out what which mag this was so you guys can read for yourself.

I think there is no need for the long or even easy break-in period for today's engines.

Here are other some links on engine break-in methods. This pertains to cars too, not just motorcycles.
http://sportbikeguy.com/garage/floor/breakin.html
http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 
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