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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The above are NLA; I had one fail (boo hiss!)

This is what I replaced them with.


They are an exact replacement size-wise, you still need the bass blocker you used with the Db351s for the dash (otherwise you will get bass canceled out the back as they're open-back speakers like the Db351s) and they're a very good match sound-quality and spectral-response wise.

I'm happy and if you're going to put something decent up there in the dash this is IMHO a good choice.
 

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Bass blocker? You mean a 6db high pass cross over, aka a capacitor? Has nothing to do with it being an "open back speaker", it has to do with them being small speakers and unable to handle low bass.
 

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These come with a pair of capacitors in the packaging. I forget their rating. Installed in my 2018 but had to run new wires since it's not prewired anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bass blocker? You mean a 6db high pass cross over, aka a capacitor? Has nothing to do with it being an "open back speaker", it has to do with them being small speakers and unable to handle low bass.
Correct, inline capacitor. And no, it has nothing to do with them being UNABLE to handle lower frequencies (they can't reproduce anything at all below 80Hz or so and aren't big enough to move a material amount of air at low frequencies anyway but that's not the problem.) The dash speakers are inline (parallel) with the DOOR speakers in front unless you entirely bypass and replace the factory wiring and the lower frequencies from the dash speaker will cancel that coming from the door speakers if both the door and dash speakers issue it since the in-dash speakers are open-back and they are not in a closed compartment to the rear (the underside of the dash is open to the passenger compartment, obviously.) The factory speaker in that location is just a tweeter and thus does not have this issue.

This is not a problem with midrange and higher frequencies as they are sufficiently far out-of-phase as frequency rises that it doesn't disturb the sound field materially. For frequencies in the mid-bass to low-midrange it does. I already had wired up the harness for that with the Polks (my original thread on my sound build is still here) so these were drop-in replacements.

All my door speakers are still fine; I suspect it's the sun exposure on the dash deck that did the Polk on the driver side in.
 

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Correct, inline capacitor. And no, it has nothing to do with them being UNABLE to handle lower frequencies (they can't reproduce anything at all below 80Hz or so and aren't big enough to move a material amount of air at low frequencies anyway but that's not the problem.) The dash speakers are inline (parallel) with the DOOR speakers in front unless you entirely bypass and replace the factory wiring and the lower frequencies from the dash speaker will cancel that coming from the door speakers if both the door and dash speakers issue it since the in-dash speakers are open-back and they are not in a closed compartment to the rear (the underside of the dash is open to the passenger compartment, obviously.) The factory speaker in that location is just a tweeter and thus does not have this issue.

This is not a problem with midrange and higher frequencies as they are sufficiently far out-of-phase as frequency rises that it doesn't disturb the sound field materially. For frequencies in the mid-bass to low-midrange it does. I already had wired up the harness for that with the Polks (my original thread on my sound build is still here) so these were drop-in replacements.

All my door speakers are still fine; I suspect it's the sun exposure on the dash deck that did the Polk on the driver side in.
This is a very helpful post. Thanks. I just picked up a '17 Touring non bose and one of the first things I need to do is upgrade the sound system. I have been searching but couldn't find how the front dash tweeters are wired into the stock system. A quick question - if the front door and dash speakers are wired in parallel, does that mean that the stock dash tweeters are being fed a full range signal?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They have a blocking capacitor in-line with them, but yes. There is no crossover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well..... we could argue that (since it just blocks energy but does not direct it to the other driver -- the door speaker is "technically" full-range); the "common vernacular" for a crossover requires that the high frequencies be blocked on the way to one or more of the other drivers (e.g. at least by an inductor) which is absent. But I suppose I'm being pedantic with that :cool:
 

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Well..... we could argue that (since it just blocks energy but does not direct it to the other driver -- the door speaker is "technically" full-range); the "common vernacular" for a crossover requires that the high frequencies be blocked on the way to one or more of the other drivers (e.g. at least by an inductor) which is absent. But I suppose I'm being pedantic with that :cool:
A one way crossover is still a crossover and a single cap is a 6db high pass crossover for a single speaker. Youre insinuating that all crossovers are at least two way.

1st Order / 6 db Butterworth Crossover Table (diyaudioandvideo.com)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well as I said perhaps I'm being pedantic but "crossover" IMHO means something is crossed from one place to another and that implies that both (or all) are speakers in question are "active" in the network in question; I prefer to call a single capacitor (or single-speaker connection whether simple capacitor or an L/C network, where the other(s) are left directly connected) a filter ("frequency filter".)

Call it as you wish :)
 
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