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Discussion Starter #141
I've bought two of them from Mazda and each time I've gone in and asked for a pilot bushing, they say it doesn't have one. I get them to spin the screen around so I can show it to them. As I recall it is not shown in the exploded view of the clutch (where you'd expect it). It is shown with the exploded view of the crankshaft. I believe they call it the rear crankshaft sleeve.

GNY is correct in that is does not support the nose of the tranny input shaft, but I assume it is there for a reason. Each of the salvage yard ATX engines I've bought lacked it, but the MTX engines have it so I have installed it both times I've put an ATX motor in the car.

When I get home, I'll see if I can find a part number for you.
 

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The main reason its there is due to the engine block being used on multiple different kinds of cars and other mtx trans. There's no need for it on our MTX. So if it were me. I wouldn't bother looking for nor replacing it. Although its a cheap part. Its not worth the time as its not used for anything at all on our platform.
 

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Discussion Starter #143
Part number is AJ01-16-533A SLEEVE. Cost me $10.83. TGNY is likely right and I could have saved 4oz of weight, but what da hell.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #144
Poly Bushings!

Got new lower control arms with fresh ball joints. Pressed out the brand new rubber bushings and pressed in the new poly bushings.

Here we have (from top to bottom):
Original rubber bushings removed from the new control arm
New poly bushings to be installed
New control arm with rubber bushings
New control arm with poly bushings



Here we have (from top to bottom):
New control arm with rubber bushings
New control arm with poly bushings



Here we have the old upper A-arm with old rubber bushings removed and new poly bushings installed



Note the Eccentric crush sleeve for more negative camber. :thumbup:




I don't know about you, but I'm bushed. :p
 

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Love what I'm seeing here man! Amazing work! Also, really loving the Bullitt as your new DD. :)

Are you already on a Mustang forum? If not, you should be on ModdedMustangs.com Best Mustang forum out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #146
Love what I'm seeing here man! Amazing work! Also, really loving the Bullitt as your new DD. :)

Are you already on a Mustang forum? If not, you should be on ModdedMustangs.com Best Mustang forum out there.
Thanks for the props!

I've been really enjoying the Bullitt. It is a hoot to drive. I haven't been on the Mustang forums yet for fear that I'll soon be modding that car too. :D For now it is seeing autocross duty in F-Stock. It's day on the track will eventually come. ;)
 

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You should join! The Mod bug with a Mustang will bite you hard anyways. I said I wasn't really going to Mod the car a ton when I bought it....2 and a half years later I have near full bolt ons less heads and cams. Overall, I'm not doing too bad though. hahahahhaa.

Honestly though, you'll the find forum over there to be a big upgrade from any forum you've ever been on. ModdedMustangs is super active, friendly, and an AWESOME community and there are some really knowledgeable guys over there who know just about everything there is to know about our pony cars. I'm under the same name on there if you decide to join man. We'd love to have you.
 

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Discussion Starter #148
Suspension work continues. Got the frame in and lower control arms. Here's a shot showing the new tow hook and the solid subframe bushings installed.



Here we have the lower control arms installed with the new poly bushings.



Currently working on new wheel bearings and longer wheel studs. I figure there is no better time than now for those items.

Waiting patiently are the new Bilsteins and upper ball joints. :D



Can't wait to get this thing back on four tires. :)
 

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I love everything about this thread!! CanyonRider, you're flippin' great dude!
 

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Discussion Starter #151
I love everything about this thread!! CanyonRider, you're flippin' great dude!
Thanks, Man! It's great to have folks that share enthusiasm for racing the 6.

The build updates are great as usual, but how's the racing CanyonRider? Got any sweet onboard footage to show us, maybe some sweet overtakes?
Sorry, I don't have a camera setup for the 6 yet. I have one in the Bullitt, but its not really adaptable to the 6.

I'm hoping to have the car together and ready for a shakedown run at Virginia Motorsports Park on Jan 15th. Maybe Santa will bring a new camera. ;) Let's keep our fingers crossed. :)

The first points event for the 2012 season is Feb 25th. Can't wait! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #154 (Edited)
Wheel & Tire Fitment

I've been doing a little wheel & tire fitment analysis. So being an engineer, naturally I developed a spreadsheet. :)

Starting with the stock wheel & tire combo on the first line, I developed dimensional data for a number of combinations - recognizing that Hoosier race rubber gets more expensive as diameter increases and fewer widths are offered at larger diameters. It seems 16" and 17" are in the sweet spot of their market.

The two key data points or criteria I'm working from are Tire Height and Hub to Back of Tire distance. I've found the 6 likes tire height between 24" & 25". It lacks lowend torque, so taller tires make it struggle coming out of low speed turns. Anything shorter than 24" really limits topend and results in alot more shifting. Hub to BOT is important basicly for clearance.

I'm going to start with the 16x8s I have from the RX7 and keep an eye out for some Mustang Cobra wheels. The rears are commonly 17x10.5 with 18mm offset. They should fit, but will likely stick out - which is OK.
 

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The two key data points or criteria I'm working from are Tire Height and Hub to Back of Tire distance. I've found the 6 likes tire height between 24" & 25". It lacks lowend torque, so taller tires make it struggle coming out of low speed turns. Anything shorter than 24" really limits topend and results in alot more shifting. Hub to BOT is important basicly for clearance.
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What outcomes are you tuning for? Less shifting, top speed in general or a best lap time on a particular track? Take it for what it's worth, but here are my track philosophies for all three:

1. Less Shifting - Who cares? The one exception is a situation where your gearing and tire choice forces you to shift up right before a critical braking and downshifting sequence.

2. Top Speed - Maybe important, maybe not, depends on the track. More accurately it depends on the corner preceding the longest straightaway, this is usually the most important corner to tune for. It's not so important (still important, though) how fast you end up at your braking point at the end of the straightaway, but, rather, how much faster your exit speed is compared to an opponent or the clock. In equally powered cars if you can exit a corner with 200 more rpm than an identically exit geared opponent onto the longest straight you carry that advantage at wide open throttle for many, many, seconds and extend your lead. If you give back a little bit by running out of gear at the end it doesn't much matter as you *should* be able to brake better and later (you're braking from a slightly lower speed than if you had more gear), extending your lead further under braking even if you lost a little bit of lead when your (higher final-geared) opponent gained a little. He has to brake from a higher speed. Of course, if you bobble the exit onto the straight you are passed, so treat that corner like your first born.

3. Best Lap time - I guess more so in Solo 1, you have to figure all the variables. Unlike wheel-to-wheel racing you don't have to factor being held up by a slower car as much, but I guess it does come into play. If you get a point by at the end of a straight from a high HP car where you benefited from the draft most of the way, then that would reward tall gearing to take advantage of top speeds you wouldn't normally obtain. If the rest of the track is open a situation like this will result in the best lap time. The fun of the sport, of course, is doing well in the tighter sections where your skill and car tuning/engineering are rewarded. A shorter tire will generally make you faster in these sections through tighter gearing and slightly lower center of gravity.

Sorry, I don't know much about the V6 or if this is all moot in the VVT universe, but it used to be true: If your engine specs a range of valve clearances that can be taken into concert with tire and gearing choices. Let's say your intakes are .008-.010 and your exhausts are .010-.012. The tighter valve clearances are going to give you a higher revving engine with less low end torque (think more top end at the end of the straight). Looser valves are going to give you more low end torque out of the corners but take several hundred RPM off your effective redline.
 

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Discussion Starter #157
All very good thoughts. I think if we follow your points to a conclusion, it is: in the absence of unlimited budget (mine being most certainly limited) every setup is a compromise. But as any good racer would, we document everything at each event. We record the car setup; the speed and RPM at the end of each straight; the braking points; the gear used in each corner; lap times; the weather; our overall driving impressions; etc. Armed with this information we can anticipate the impact of any changes make between sessions or between events in hope of being better the next time. :thumbup:
 

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If you have the telemetry to track the rpm at the end of each straight, great. Me, I'm picking my latest, greatest braking point and won't be looking at the tach, I'm looking at my apex. What I will check, every corner that doesn't have another quick turn-in right after it, is my exit rpm. Every lap, every corner that I can. The rpm you exit a corner with (I check it the instant my wheel is straight) tells you a whole hell of a lot about how well you executed the turn-in, rotation, and track-out.
 

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ThirdMazda what kind of racing do you do? You seem to know a lot, and being into motorsports myself, it was fun to read, though I'll need to re-read some of it after I get some sleep tomorrow :p bit tired, cant focus.
 
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