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VERY nice CR - What metal did you use for the spacer? As I've heard those aren't typically the safest things in the world to install if you're going to be using the car for performance. Maybe I'm way off, but I heard they weren't always the best idea.

Definitely a bit of needed breathing room though on the knuckles, so I guess it had to be done either way.

Oh and I'll say it before anyone else - TOO MUCH 4x4!!!!11!1!!! :lol:
Regular generic spacers aren't because it leaves all the stress on the lugs and studs, instead of having the little ring in the middle to help with stress and support, called the hub. That is why you get hub centric spacers, with a new hub built in/on the outside of the spacer so that you spread the stresses out across the hub ring as well as the studs and lugs, instead of having everything supported by just the lugs, which defeats the whole purpose of the hub being there in the first place, they were designed for a reason. Hub centrics are much safer than generic spacers.


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Discussion Starter #382
still waiting for the fender flare source. :D


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I got them direct from the manufacturer in Europe. I'm not aware of any distributer in the US. Shipping is 5-6 weeks and communication is not their strong point. They are available in a 2" or 3" flare. I got the 2". but I'm thinking I should have got the 3". Once I get them installed, I'll provide a review and full details. I may put together a GB if people are interested to save on shipping.
 

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Regular generic spacers aren't because it leaves all the stress on the lugs and studs, instead of having the little ring in the middle to help with stress and support, called the hub. That is why you get hub centric spacers, with a new hub built in/on the outside of the spacer so that you spread the stresses out across the hub ring as well as the studs and lugs, instead of having everything supported by just the lugs, which defeats the whole purpose of the hub being there in the first place, they were designed for a reason. Hub centrics are much safer than generic spacers.


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Thanks man - makes much more sense that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #385
With the flare positioned where we want it we drill the holes, insert Rivnuts and remove the tape. I used Rivnuts rather than rivets because the flare is attached to both the fender and the bumper cover. If we ever need to remove the bumper cover we'll be able to unscrew the flare. I brushed some black primer on the cut metal edges before removing the tape.



Finally we install the flare. We use welting to provide a tight seal between the flare and the fender and to prevent the hard ABS from rubbing the paint off. You could go with black welting - if you were boring. :lol: I think the yellow complements the car.



One down and three to go!

CR
 

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That looks sooooo F'n awesome dude!!!

What exactly is welting?


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Discussion Starter #387

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Discussion Starter #389 (Edited)
That's looks awesome man, do you have a shot with all of them finished?
Not yet.

With the first one done, we move to the other side.

Tape off the fender.



Pre-drill holes in the flare for the #6 screws.



With the other side done, we measure up from the bottom of the fender to match the position and tape the flare in place.



Trace the flare, mark the holes, drop down 1.5" and draw a cut line tapered to the ends.



Cut away! We have to leave a bit of extra material where the fender meets the bumper cover so we can add a screw to hold them together. During the trimming, we cut the factory screw out.





Drill the holes, then pull the tape off. Here is how much we trimmed.



Notice I don't have any inner fenders. If I did, I'd have to figure out a way to secure them since we trimmed off the screws at the fender lip.

Insert the rivnuts and cut 4' of welting.



I found it easier to install a screw at the bottom ends of the flare, then insert the welting at the top, working my way to each end with screws.



Then trim off the excess welting and tighten the screws.





The car is jacked up so hopefully it won't look like a monster truck. On to the rear!

CR
 

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I would be so nervous cutting off my fender like that...the yellow welting looks good on your car, I really like the gray and yellow theme you got going on
 

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Discussion Starter #391
In between NCAA tourney games I got one of the rear flares done.

Here's where we started. The 275s rubbing and still a couple inches to the bump stops.





Here's the after condition:



With the suspension compressed all the way to the bump stops.



Notice where the wheel is relative to the exhaust in the before and after. :cool:

One more to go!
CR
 

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Nice that it clears the door in the back- I was a tad nervous about that after seeing the first pic...
 

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Discussion Starter #393
Yeah, there's not alot of room there. I had to trim the flare about a 1/4 inch and eliminate one screw hole, but it clears the door opening.



CR
 

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Nice that it clears the door in the back- I was a tad nervous about that after seeing the first pic...
Yeah, there's not alot of room there. I had to trim the flare about a 1/4 inch and eliminate one screw hole, but it clears the door opening.

CR
You guys talk as if he gives free rides in his non-existent back seats :p
 

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Hey, as long as the door opens :p
 

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Discussion Starter #396
I've considered gutting the rear doors and welding the door skins in place, but I'm surprised how often I crawl into the back to work on something. I'll probably keep them operational until I install a full cage.
 

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Discussion Starter #397
So if you’ve been following along, we added flares in anticipation of being able to lower the car while still utilizing all of the available suspension travel. The next step is spring selection - and a bit of chassis engineering.

Like most other decisions, spring selection is a compromise. You have to begin by asking, “What am I trying to accomplish?” A smooth ride? Minimum ride height? Maximum wheel travel? These are all competing criteria, but not necessarily mutually exclusive. You need to know the desired ride height, the available suspension travel, the car weight (ideally the corner weights), the relationship between wheelrate and springrate (determined by suspension geometry) and the road characteristics you are likely to encounter.

Let’s start with the front:
Let’s say we’re going to lower the car to the point where we have 4” of suspension travel before hitting the bumpstops. When last on the scales we had LF=844lbs, RF= 848lbs. For simplicity, let’s say 850lbs each. I haven’t weighed the wheels, tires, knuckles, control arms, strut, spring and CV shaft, but I guessing there’s about 150lbs of unsprung weight at each corner - leaving 700lbs of sprung. Let’s assume we are going to be driving on a fairly smooth track (AutoX tends to be much bumpier) so we design for a maximum 1.5g bump. Based on these assumptions, we would be absorbing a 1050lb force over 4”, therefore requiring a minimum wheelrate of 262.5lb/in.

Of course WR and SR are not the same, but they a related by a constant that is a function of the control arm linkage ratios and the instant center of the front suspension. After some measuring and calculating, I came up with WR=0.5SR (I think @KevinK2 has developed a model of our front suspension - perhaps he can compare his findings).

Therefore we, need a 525lb/in spring to handle a 1.5g bump in 4 inches.

Suspension travel has a dramatic impact on spring rate. In this example, if you lower the car another inch you would need 700lb/in springs.

Suspension geometry also has a dramatic impact. If we use an eccentric bushing at the lower strut mount that could move the strut mount outward 0.5”, it would change our SR formula to WR=0.6SR. Now we could lower the car to 3” of travel and use 575lb/in springs.

Anyhow, this is what I’m working on presently - the wheels are always turning. :D
 

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Give him a desk and a ridiculous pension and we could call him MR. CR. :)
 

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I just spent the last two hours gazing at this thread. I don't think I've blinked. I'm not usually into chopping up newer cars in good shape but you've done a remarkable job. There's a huge difference between the cars that are done right and the ones that aren't. Clearly, you know what you're doing, I have a lot of respect for you and your car. Thanks for the good read...I'll be checking back to see your progress!
 
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