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Discussion Starter #1
I have a factory oem sport bumper that needs paint.
I found out that it needs to be baked during the painting process to take out some gasses and to prevent the paint from cracking because ithe bumper is flimsy.
Is this true? Should I get it baked?
 

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You don't need to bake the bumper. You just need to make sure that they put enough flex agent in the paint mixture so that when the bumper flexes the paint won't crack.
 

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I did a rather large touch up on my OEM bumper with a spray can from paintscratch.com, and just let it air dry. No cracking, no chipping, just shitty workmanship :p . I really need to do it again, but I just used some of the bully dog adhesion stuff before I did anything and the primer adhered quite well.
 

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I have a factory oem sport bumper that needs paint.
I found out that it needs to be baked during the painting process to take out some gasses and to prevent the paint from cracking because ithe bumper is flimsy.
Is this true? Should I get it baked? [/b]
No, that's not true. modern paints are all catalyst paints, in other words they "dry", or more accurately they cure, by chemical reaction not heat.
Baked finishes went away when enamel paints stopped being used. Places like Earl Schieb were probably some of the last to use those systems.
The flexible rubber/plastic bumpers on most of today's cars require the addition of what is called a "flex agent" to the paint applied to them. This gives the paint an elastic property that prevents it from cracking when the bumper flexes. It is important that the paint be mixed properly and the correct amount of flex agent be added, or you'll have paint cracking and flaking off the bumper in a short time. :swearin:
 

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it is a common misconception because of the older paints, that the paint needs to be baked on. not true anymore, the only reason you need the booth now is to eliminate particulate matter from the air and increasing the temperature of the item for smoother laydown of the paint. just to qualify myself i apprenticed under a master painter for abount 1 1/2 years. not just hear say info :)
but again i will always suggest taking it to a professional to be painted, reasonably affordable, and better quality
 

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it is a common misconception because of the older paints, that the paint needs to be baked on. not true anymore, the only reason you need the booth now is to eliminate particulate matter from the air and increasing the temperature of the item for smoother laydown of the paint. just to qualify myself i apprenticed under a master painter for abount 1 1/2 years. not just hear say info :)
but again i will always suggest taking it to a professional to be painted, reasonably affordable, and better quality [/b]
i was going to add that, absolutely. I have not worked with master painters but am fairly self taught after many years of painting road race car body panels. today's paints require proper mixing, careful regulation of the environment that they're applied in, all of which requires more than a $50 gun you bought at the local auto zone and your 3hp Sears air compressor.
Actually, the expense of just the basic proper tools and the minmum amounts of materials needed to paint something like a rubber bumper is most likely more than you would end up paying a body shop to do the job, and if you've never done paint work, trust me, your first time will not be a show winner! :swearin:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So will baking even do anything? (make it worse? add a few extra years life span?) or are they just trying to rip me off?

thanks to everyone!
 

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Some shops will use it to speed up the drying process [/b]
once again, perhaps you weren't paying attention to the previous couple messages:

DO NOT DO NOT DO NOT BAKE TODAY'S CATALYST PAINTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

and shops do NOT do it "to speed up the drying process", that's just bullshit.

Catalyst paints (the ones being used for about the past 10 years) use chemical reaction to "cure". Heat is NOT part of the process and baking is not only unnecessary but would most likely ruin the finish.

I thought it was explained pretty clearly before, I guess not........maybe this time it will sink in.
 

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I have more than a little experience with painting, thanks. Both on my own and having it done outside, including having my Mazda6 in the paint shop 4 times now. Not everyone uses a chemical catalyst paint, some shops use a much more modern photoactive catalyst.

After painting the painted part, while still in the paint booth at a moderately high (but not "hot", and more importantly "controlled") temperature, is "baked" under intense ultraviolet lights to cure the paint rapidly, the more light, the faster the drying process. Though I'm not sure of the exact steps with the technology I believe it is somewhat different when dealing with a flex agent in the mix.

Is this "baking" in the older sense of the word of exposing the part to high temperature? No. But it's not exactly a misnomer either. Did I, or the original poster when relaying what he was told, mention "Heat"? Nope. Just "baking". You're still baking, but just with light rather than heat. The nomenclature of "baking" is still often used to describe the catalyst portion of the process because it's easy for your layman to understand than saying "we're exposing your part to a bright light to dry the paint".

So why don't you let that "sink in", buddy.
 
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