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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I suppose this should be on the radar/wish list of any Mazda6 Signature owner. The 2.5t is a Direct Injection engine, and therefore will need a catch-can on the PCV line to keep the valves from crudding up with baked-on engine oil. Has anybody researched this or perhaps found a solution for the CX-9 that should fit on the Mazda6 as well?
 

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In our local group, someone's installing this Oil Catch Can. A reliable friend of mine assured me that this is a good modification.

"For DI & turbo, it'll be beneficial. TitoMar will soon have an OVT 1."

"Oh, u need not worry w warranty...its a bolt on reversible mod. OCC will delay carbon build up(happy)"

Once I have time, I'll have this installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
In our local group, someone's installing this Oil Catch Can. A reliable friend of mine assured me that this is a good modification.

"For DI & turbo, it'll be beneficial. TitoMar will soon have an OVT 1."

"Oh, u need not worry w warranty...its a bolt on reversible mod. OCC will delay carbon build up(happy)"

Once I have time, I'll have this installed.
These are a HUGE plus for these engines. Not only will it not affect warranty, but they are CARB legal (without CARB certification) in the state of California. There are some smog stations that may attempt to fail you on the visual inspection due to their own ignorance & paranoia (that they could be setting themselves up for getting busted); the simple fact is they are LEGAL in California on today's modern vehicles. I don't have it on this computer handy but on another one that is offline at the moment. but I do have an official pdf from the State of California specifically speaking to this component and this part of the emissions system. Not only that, but MFG such as Ford performance offer them for sale (Mustang, etc) and they are 50 state legal. FYI for those so considering this IMO, essential piece of hardware for DI engines.
 

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These are a HUGE plus for these engines. Not only will it not affect warranty, but they are CARB legal (without CARB certification) in the state of California. There are some smog stations that may attempt to fail you on the visual inspection due to their own ignorance & paranoia (that they could be setting themselves up for getting busted); the simple fact is they are LEGAL in California on today's modern vehicles. I don't have it on this computer handy but on another one that is offline at the moment. but I do have an official pdf from the State of California specifically speaking to this component and this part of the emissions system. Not only that, but MFG such as Ford performance offer them for sale (Mustang, etc) and they are 50 state legal. FYI for those so considering this IMO, essential piece of hardware for DI engines.
This is very assuring! I truly trust my friend with his recommendation but this being legal in California is a big plus. I've heard that California has stringent rules when it comes to the environment.
 

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i thought that mazda designed an amazing engine with the high compression low octane sky active stuff. you mean to tell me in all their wisdom they completely ignored the oil and carbon control issue identified a decade ago and owners need to start adding those stupid little cans to these cars now too?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i thought that mazda designed an amazing engine with the high compression low octane sky active stuff. you mean to tell me in all their wisdom they completely ignored the oil and carbon control issue identified a decade ago and owners need to start adding those stupid little cans to these cars now too?
Mazda isn't the only one. Fortunately and to their credit, Ford has at least presented an aftermarket solution. Cummins, to their credit, has included an oil separator for a few years now on their diesels. The DI system is just that way as far as some way to capture that oil.. Lexus, IIRC, has created a system that is both DI and Port injected to mitigate the oil build up.
 

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Subscribed. I'm interested to see if someone will or has done this, and consider making a DIY thread so others can benefit from it...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Subscribed. I'm interested to see if someone will or has done this, and consider making a DIY thread so others can benefit from it...
Excellent idea! We have not YET acquired our new Maz6 Signature, but when we do, it will be one of, if not the first, addition to the car. For me, the less oil carbon-ing up the valves from the moment we get it from the dealership, the better. YMMV. IMO it's a necessary part of preventative maintenance/protocol for these DI engines.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Interesting detail regarding the 2.5T and carbon build up. 2nd to.last question in the following SavageGeese interview with Dave Coleman.

https://www.savagegeese.com/reviews/mazda-cx-9



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Thanks. Here is the quote you refer to: (from Savage Geese)
DAVE COLEMAN:
Carbon buildup on DI intake valves has two contributors. The oil itself getting on the valves, and the valves being at a temperature that promotes the formation of hard deposits.

We've dramatically reduced the oil in the intake stream compared to our last DI Turbo through several measures. First, oil blowing past turbo seals directly into the intake stream has been reduced with better turbo oil seals and lower oil pressure in the turbo itself. Actual blow-by has been reduced across the board with SKYACTIV engines by improving the roundness of the cylinder bores through improved analysis of casting, machining and assembly stresses that can slightly warp the bores. Taking this into account in the design process has given us much better blow-by performance.

Finally, the realization of the sensitivity to intake valve temperature has allowed us to design the cylinder head structure, cooling system and calibration to manage intake valve temperatures to prevent carbon buildup.


There are more factors at work than just these. Personally, I don't take stock in claims such as I posted above until they are verified as fact. Right now I'd take the precaution of a catch can. If nothing shows up in the catch can after say 1k-3k miles you can remove it and go back to stock. But I BET YOU'LL FIND OIL IN IT. OTOH it would be wonderful to find someone who mitgated this problem in a true DI engine, but I'm not convinced.

This article may help:
https://doyouevenboost.com/blogs/news/50063555-how-does-an-oil-catch-can-work-and-why-is-it-beneficial
 

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Thanks. Here is the quote you refer to: (from Savage Geese)
DAVE COLEMAN:
Carbon buildup on DI intake valves has two contributors. The oil itself getting on the valves, and the valves being at a temperature that promotes the formation of hard deposits.

We've dramatically reduced the oil in the intake stream compared to our last DI Turbo through several measures. First, oil blowing past turbo seals directly into the intake stream has been reduced with better turbo oil seals and lower oil pressure in the turbo itself. Actual blow-by has been reduced across the board with SKYACTIV engines by improving the roundness of the cylinder bores through improved analysis of casting, machining and assembly stresses that can slightly warp the bores. Taking this into account in the design process has given us much better blow-by performance.

Finally, the realization of the sensitivity to intake valve temperature has allowed us to design the cylinder head structure, cooling system and calibration to manage intake valve temperatures to prevent carbon buildup.


There are more factors at work than just these. Personally, I don't take stock in claims such as I posted above until they are verified as fact. Right now I'd take the precaution of a catch can. If nothing shows up in the catch can after say 1k-3k miles you can remove it and go back to stock. But I BET YOU'LL FIND OIL IN IT. OTOH it would be wonderful to find someone who mitgated this problem in a true DI engine, but I'm not convinced.

This article may help:
https://doyouevenboost.com/blogs/news/50063555-how-does-an-oil-catch-can-work-and-why-is-it-beneficial
Fair enough. So what model/manufacturer of catchcan is available for the 2.5T?

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BTW if Mazda HADN'T essentially solved this problem with the SkyActiv engines I'd know it by now. I have 160,000 miles on mine (NA 2.5L) and zero performance issues I can identify; I'm not pulling the intake without a reason to do so.

Oh, and I also have very near zero oil consumption over an OCI too, so there's that as well.
 

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Hard to argue against fantastic results such as these... If you still are h*ll-bent-for-leather wanting to install a catch can go for the Mann-Hummel Provent 200. Be aware though that wintertime freezing-off of the outlet line (perhaps more-so versus the inlet line, depending on the line lengths) could occur, resulting in you potentially blowing out one of the engine's oil seals. May need to heat-trace and insulate same. Complications...
 

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Where are the pictures showing oil inside of intake manifolds and crusted up intake valves? I really haven't seen too much evidence that there is an issue that needs to be resolved.

What I have seen in this thread to support this is a nods up to the modification and a few product recommendations.
I have also read the statement from a Mazda engineer, and an owner who has had apparently no evidence of a need after 100+ thousand miles (and has oil analyses done regularly).
I have also noted that nobody has mentioned that all of the 4 cylinders used in the 6 have their PCV valves mounted on an oil separator.



From being in this group for just over a year, I have seen a lot of people who like to bolt things on; without knowing if there is a real benefit or need; along with plenty of good information which I have utilized in one way or another.

So in my opinion this is not something I need to be concerned about.
 

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i asked a friend with a mazda 3 who is an oldskool hotrod guy, lured to mazda by the skyactiv's ability to have such high compression on such low octane fuel. he said on his 3 the pc system is not the best and pulls a lot of oil. he is going to pull the intake and make some changes to the pcv to include a custom designed filtering system. he said after 10k miles he already sees oil in the intake and can see signs of oil burning on the spark plugs. very picky, detail oriented guy. cleans the undercarriage by hand monthly and the doorjambs with a toothbrush, has an oil analysis done with every oil change, and changes plugs more than oil. i think it just depends how picky you are. after speaking with him i quit doubting the people here.

generally i'm just with you watching people bolt dumb things on. we had an 850hp 363 SBF dry sump race car with a catch can and it was an annoying headache, which is why i kinda whined on the first page
 

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i asked a friend with a mazda 3 who is an oldskool hotrod guy, lured to mazda by the skyactiv's ability to have such high compression on such low octane fuel. he said on his 3 the pc system is not the best and pulls a lot of oil. he is going to pull the intake and make some changes to the pcv to include a custom designed filtering system. he said after 10k miles he already sees oil in the intake and can see signs of oil burning on the spark plugs. very picky, detail oriented guy. cleans the undercarriage by hand monthly and the doorjambs with a toothbrush, has an oil analysis done with every oil change, and changes plugs more than oil. i think it just depends how picky you are. after speaking with him i quit doubting the people here.

generally i'm just with you watching people bolt dumb things on. we had an 850hp 363 SBF dry sump race car with a catch can and it was an annoying headache, which is why i kinda whined on the first page
I also think it matters the vintage of Skyactiv. Mazda has had skyactiv engines since 2010. First applocation was on 2nd gen Mazda 3 and then 1st Gen CX5. I expect that Mazda has revised the PVC system over the last few years. What year/gen is your friend's Mazda 3? Mazda has always been engineer-driven. The newer Skyactiv architecture has been continuously improved upon since its introduction. IMO.

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