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At work so time is limited for searches, Pep Boys tells me both my rotors are beyond turning (only 29K, never hard them turned before, Thanks Mazada for the cheap $hit parts)

By the time its all said and done (I have a discount couponfor PB) it would cost me about $340 for two new rotors and ceramic pads. Buying stock rotors and doing it myself won't fly as Star auto and Auto Zone come up with rotors are not available in their computer systems.

What are the costs on Hi. Po. aftermarket rotors and pads. And where do I get them?


Thanks in advance
 

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At work so time is limited for searches, Pep Boys tells me both my rotors are beyond turning (only 29K, never hard them turned before, Thanks Mazada for the cheap $hit parts)

By the time its all said and done (I have a discount couponfor PB) it would cost me about $340 for two new rotors and ceramic pads. Buying stock rotors and doing it myself won't fly as Star auto and Auto Zone come up with rotors are not available in their computer systems.

What are the costs on Hi. Po. aftermarket rotors and pads. And where do I get them?
Thanks in advance
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You could have searched the forum. Here is a thread started about 26 hours before you posted. Please take the time to read it.

As for the "cheap **** parts," all rotors are made from the same specialized cast iron material, and the dimensions for replacements are determined by the position of the calipers, so any replacement rotors you get will likely wear at the same rate (assuming you maintain the same driving habits) as the originals did -- unless you opt for replacement brake pads that are more "rotor friendly." But -- broad generalization here -- there is something approaching a reverse correlation between the rotor friendliness of a brake pad and the "bite" of a brake pad. Most of the dusting you see on your wheels comes from the material of the rotor, and only a portion of it from the brake pads. Most "low dust" brake pads are "low stopping power" brake pads (but there are some exceptions).

I have mileage similar to yours, and am facing the same buying decisions. Tentatively, I am thinking of getting Raybestos PG Plus replacement rotors and PBR Ultimate brake pads from an on-line retailer who is not a site sponsor, so I shall not post the URL here, but which has a trade name a lot like Auto Parts Warehouse. The PBR Ultimates are not rotor-friendly, so my thinking is to give them inexpensive rotors to chew on. See the multiple posts by the poster who calls himself "tedium" in the seven-page discussion here.

EDIT: Here is a long excerpt from one of the posts on TurboBricks by the guy, "tedium" (a high-level engineer at Bendix Australia, whose products are sold here as Axxis and PBR), mentioned above:


Originally Posted by stealthfti
tedium, Thank you for the explanations. As you can find the time, further information on the differences in pad materials would be appreciated. I can and do read the hype put out by padmakers; and too often the BS is just TOO deep to bother trying to wade through.
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"First, a disclaimer: I do not represent anybody but myself. Nothing I say is official or gospel. I could be making all of this up.

"Okay?

"I see in your later post that you found my earlier post on friction material types. For those that missed it or need a refresher, here's a summary of material styles:

"NAO (Non-Asbestos Organic, aka Organic, Ceramic, Japanese-style): Low wear, low noise, low dust, long life, relatively low friction but very stable (which is one of the subtle things that make one material feel good and another feel bad, although a layperson won't be able to pick what it is). Great for general road use, not for high-temperature applications (or else they fade off, and wear rates go through the roof). Because they don't wear the rotor, NAOs develop DTV leading to shudder.

"Low-met (aka low-steel, Ceramic (again), European-style): high wear, dusty, higher friction, better ability to handle high temperatures. Also very stable. European cars are required to meet brake test regulations with a failed booster, so high friction is necessary, and the car is designed around that. Cars designed around high friction feel ordinary with low friction.

"Semi-met (aka American-style): Medium wear and dust, low-to-moderate friction. Not really stable, but will take a beating and keep bouncing back. I believe most American cars have started using NAOs, but pick-ups and SUVs still use semi-mets.

"Now...manufacturer specific. A manufacturer that has been mentioned in this thread from time to time.

"They have three individual NAO, two semi-met, and one low-met aftermarket material. There are a few small fiddles and tweaks to most of them, mostly cosmetic (so they look different enough to pass off as different materials).

"As mentioned above, in NAO, there's The Good Stuff, The Cheap Stuff, and The Crap Stuff. Well, they're all quite good performers under normal driving conditions, so the names aren't really fair.

"The Good Stuff is, for all intents, exactly the same as a very popular OE material. It's been on Australian and US vehicles. It is very good for DTV (ie takes a very long time), and, for a NAO, handles a bit of heat.
The Cheap Stuff is a distant relative of The Good Stuff. It's actually a little higher in friction, and is quite a sturdy performer across the board. But it has DTV problems. It used to have noise problems too, but that's been bred out of it now.
The Crap Stuff is pretty good for operating friction, DTV and noise, but really doesn't do well with heat. Fade city.

"In Australia, Bendix Advance is mostly The Cheap Stuff, with a bit of The Good Stuff on high-volume late-model vehicles that had specific noise problems. The new Bendix General Ceramic (blah marketing terminology) is a mix of Cheap and Crap for different references. Lots of other brands and labels come from the same factory, and most of them are variations of The Crap Stuff.

"I assumed PBR and Axxis Deluxe are Crap. They may be Cheap. They may be one of each.

"I have Crap Stuff on the front of my wife's car, and it feels fantastic. It's not a performance car. The brakes don't get hot. If it ever started to fade, we'd slow down. It hasn't happened yet, because we just don't drive that car that way.

"Semi-mets: Bendix Heavy Duty and the various Metal Masters are the same thing. It's a cosmetic tweak on the old Bendix Metal King Plus. A few references of Australian Heavy Duty have a different material that used to be sold here as Performax. I have HD on the front of my brick. It feels...yeah...okay...but I'm a brake nerd. It works, and I have no doubt that it will stop me under all circumstances I'll ever see on the road, and then some.

"Low-mets: The Ultimate family is the only low-met made there. There are a few close relatives, some of which are put on local police cars from the factory. It's high in friction, agressive, fairly quick wearing, dusty, and oooooh so nice to drive. It's not a race material either. There are rumours that it leaves depositions all over rotors when it gets too hot (race situations). Still works though. These types of materials are made for emergency stops from Autobahn speeds. NAOs just don't cut the mustard in Europe.

"There are many other low-met formulations out of Europe, from as many friction manufacturers as there are in Europe.

"Given that Volvos came from the factory with a high-friction low-met, my recommendation is to use low-mets, and get used to buying new rotors every second pad change. For show cars (and why would anybody choose a Volvo for a show car?), NAOs will suffice, and will keep your wheels clean.

"Signing off now before I let out any more secrets...

"tim"
 

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go to the mazda dealer. They replaced mine at 40K under warranty
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Why did they replace it under the warranty? Is it not considered a wearable part?

I just got my car back from the dealer after having complained about squealing during braking.. They test-drove it and and diagnosed it as a pulsation at highway speeds, then recommended me to have the front rotors and pads replaced. Is this something that would be covered under the warranty? I don't want to pay for something if I can get it done for free (even if I have to go to another dealership!)

Thanks...
 

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there's a TSB out there for uneven wear on the front breaks/rotors. my 05 breaks were so bad at 13k they had to go. it's always worth a shot.

http://forum.mazda6tech.com/viewforum.php?f=36
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you know what, i have 20k on my brakes and they are shot as well as having warped rotors... i'll have to give that a shot. especially since i am not hard on my vehicle at all.
 

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It all depends on the SA. I had my front rotors warrantied around 20k, but when I was at the dealer again and had an issue with my locking lugs, they'd sell them to me at thier marked up retail.

it all depends on your SA
 
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