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So I get a call from my wife who I've generously let use my car (trying to keep the miles down). It starts with "you're not going to believe this....". The tone meant it had to do with my car. She knows how I am with my car. "There's a piece of metal sticking out of your tire." Not a nail or a screw. A piece of metal! *sigh* I was having a good day.

So I either need to replace 1 tire (stock Michelins w/ 24k on them). Or I need to get a whole new set. I'm thinking I'll just replace them all since the stock tires aren't great anyhow. I may end up selling the car this winter or spring.

Whatever I choose needs to be all season. It snows like a mofo at times during winter and I have a 32 mile each way drive for work (country roads on top of that). I'd prefer not to go completely broke doing this. Any suggestions? How about moving to a 225/45/17 tire? Anyone have pics of said size on stock 17's? I'm curious if it looks like the tire is overflowing on the rim and if there's much of a difference between 50 & 45 series.

Thanks......
 

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I'd prefer not to go completely broke doing this. Any suggestions? How about moving to a 225/45/17 tire?
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Consider the recently released Goodyear "with" ResponsEdge tire. It is a very interesting offering, and was designed to aim squarely at the Micjelin Pilot HX MXM4 replacement market.

As for the size, if you stray from 215/50, you would do better getting a 225/50-17 than a 225/45-17. The 45 series tire is a smidgen closer in overall diameter to a 215/50, but the 50 series tire is a better match for the stock 7" rims.

"The easiest way to prevent a tire from deforming (besides buying a more aggressive tire) is to give the sidwall a little leverage. This is done by increasing the wheel width. By making the rim WIDER than the tread, the lateral pressure on the tire can be more directly transmitted to the wheel. Since the wheel is rigid, it will not deform, and will allow the sidewall to brace itself against the wheel.

"Every tire has a spread of rim widths that it is designed to fit over. Let's say a size 225/45/17 tire will fit on a 17 inch rim from 7 to 8.5 inches wide. While the tire is designed to fit on a 7" wide rim, the actual tread of the tire would likely be as wider (possibly much wider) than the rim itself. Because the sidewall is ballooning outwards beyond the wheel, it has little leverage to resist side-to-side movements. When the sidewall cannot resist these side-to-side movements, the tread begins to roll over onto the sidewall, and the entire sidewall deforms. In extreme cases, the tire could loose its bead and put the driver in danger.

"Most experts will recommend that for aggressive driving, even the minimum wheel width listed by the manufacturer for a tire is still too small. It is possible for a skinnier tire to perform better on a skinny wheel than a wide tire on a wide wheel. "

Above excerpted from an article at Mazda6tech.com
 
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