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Discussion Starter #1
2005 mazda 6s manual

My clutch has been slipping for a while and I just recently lost 5th and reverse is about to go.

I've been researching clutch upgrades since I dont want to just replace it with all the work it takes. I have seen a lot of people suggesting the excedy stage 1 clutch and flywheel. But they dont seem to have a flywheel for the 3.0.

Does anyone else have recommendations on a good replacement with stock pedal feel? Or a different lightweight flywheel to match with the excedy stage 1?

Any help is much appreciated.

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I would stick with a stock replacement clutch unless you're making so much power that you are forced to upgrade. Stock clutch chirps third and is more than strong enough for this car. A grippier friction material will cause added heat which will make the clutch chatter issue these cars have on long drives more pronounced. A stiffer pressure plate will only cause more wear on the crankshafts thrust bearing which long term will lead to more end play and more frequent front/rear main seal leaks/replacements. The added clamping force of a stiffer pressure plate will also put more strain on your clutch pedal hydraulics, so you'll be reducing the life of the master and slave cylinder, both of which usually kind of suck to deal with. The weight of the flywheel doesn't feel like it should be changed either really. If you go too light you'll have a car that bucks while trying to mope along with traffic. You'll be riding the clutch more starting out, making more heat, and you'll be encouraging the clutch chatter issue again. I would leave it all stock. Get a stock replacement clutch and have your flywheel Blanchard ground.

The most common cause of 5th/reverse issues is deteriorated (or missing) shift cable bushings on the transmission side. Have you checked yours?

5th and reverse should never go out due to mileage or abuse. Nobody shifts into those gears agressively.
 

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I have not checked the bushings at all, I believe that I blew out the synchro as while I was driving in 5th at high speeds it just kind of popped and car revved and no longer have 5th gear, and since that happened reverse doesnt want to go I to gear and screams when it is.

Also I'm fairly sure that my throw out bearing is also broke or messed out as I hear a whining while driving and have been told that that is what it is.

I was also told that it'd be a good idea to upgrade the clutch because I have increased the power (not sure what it is never went to dyno.)


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I do not think your 5th gear/reverse issue is the clutch, it sounds more like you have a bad transmission bearing (causing the winning) that caused something to come out of alignment. 5th and reverse are also controlled by the same fork, something could have gone bad there.
Either way the tranny has to come down, open it and check everything.

I would also recommend OEM parts given the amount of work required to replace these.
 

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I have not checked the bushings at all, I believe that I blew out the synchro as while I was driving in 5th at high speeds it just kind of popped and car revved and no longer have 5th gear, and since that happened reverse doesnt want to go I to gear and screams when it is.

Also I'm fairly sure that my throw out bearing is also broke or messed out as I hear a whining while driving and have been told that that is what it is.

I was also told that it'd be a good idea to upgrade the clutch because I have increased the power (not sure what it is never went to dyno.)


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I am with @RobertD and @jman1200 on this one. Fifth and reverse are not your clutch. The synchro is only there to help you get into gear by using frition to match your trans input shaft speed to your selected gear speed (through the output shaft). Once you are gated and in gear the synchronizer assy does nothing. I believe a failed bushing could cause an alignment issue with would have the gears "pop" apart and out of gear.


I would say that unless you have added a turbo or supercharger a "stronger" clutch is unnecessary. If you are going through clutches faster than every 100,000 mi you should address your driving style.
Some manual transmission basics (general FYI for other readers):
1. NEVER use the clutch to "hold" the vehicle on a slope. Use the brake.
2. When idling stopped, take the transmission out of gear (neutral) and foot off the clutch pedal.
3. Never rest your hand on the gear selector lever when cruising.
4. Never rest your foot on the clutch pedal (or brake for that matter) when cruising.
If you want extra life then you can save the synchros by learning how to "double clutch downshift"


I have used "special" clutches over the decades and unless there is forced induction they tend to be more trouble than they are worth. I have had multiple failures (disk and cover springs) but the most annoying part is the chatter. If you are working it hard and it is hot, great, but 95% of my driving is just commuting and that just ends up trashing motor mounts from the shaking.
I would say buy quality. Go with OEM or the OEM supplier.
 

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I am with @RobertD and @jman1200 on this one. Fifth and reverse are not your clutch. The synchro is only there to help you get into gear by using frition to match your trans input shaft speed to your selected gear speed (through the output shaft). Once you are gated and in gear the synchronizer assy does nothing. I believe a failed bushing could cause an alignment issue with would have the gears "pop" apart and out of gear.


I would say that unless you have added a turbo or supercharger a "stronger" clutch is unnecessary. If you are going through clutches faster than every 100,000 mi you should address your driving style.
Some manual transmission basics (general FYI for other readers):
1. NEVER use the clutch to "hold" the vehicle on a slope. Use the brake.
2. When idling stopped, take the transmission out of gear (neutral) and foot off the clutch pedal.
3. Never rest your hand on the gear selector lever when cruising.
4. Never rest your foot on the clutch pedal (or brake for that matter) when cruising.
If you want extra life then you can save the synchros by learning how to "double clutch downshift"


I have used "special" clutches over the decades and unless there is forced induction they tend to be more trouble than they are worth. I have had multiple failures (disk and cover springs) but the most annoying part is the chatter. If you are working it hard and it is hot, great, but 95% of my driving is just commuting and that just ends up trashing motor mounts from the shaking.
I would say buy quality. Go with OEM or the OEM supplier.
Okay so I have a question about the chatter since I have heard a lot about it.
My car doesnt have any chatter at all in any gear. Now I bought my car at 144k miles and I have put 44k on it so I assume it is not still the original clutch (because I have read that they normally only last to about 120k) so what clutch was put into the car before i got it to eliminate the chatter?
Are the new OEM replacement clutches just better than the old ones or is there an upgraded clutch that is simply better?
I have been looking into this a lot and i didnt find much on here but in the forums on 6crew there are several different people that recommend the excedy stage 1 because it supposedly gets rid of the chatter.
Is that possible or is there something else that has gotten rid of the chatter in my car?

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Okay so I have a question about the chatter since I have heard a lot about it.
My car doesnt have any chatter at all in any gear. Now I bought my car at 144k miles and I have put 44k on it so I assume it is not still the original clutch (because I have read that they normally only last to about 120k) so what clutch was put into the car before i got it to eliminate the chatter?
Are the new OEM replacement clutches just better than the old ones or is there an upgraded clutch that is simply better?
I have been looking into this a lot and i didnt find much on here but in the forums on 6crew there are several different people that recommend the excedy stage 1 because it supposedly gets rid of the chatter.
Is that possible or is there something else that has gotten rid of the chatter in my car?

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The "chatter" that people refer to when speaking of a clutch is when the clutch is engaged (usually starting out). It can be as forcefull as wheel hop when a tire spins (although it is not spinning with clutch chatter).

A clutch can last a very long time if it is driven sensibly (relatively flat terrain also helps)and a 150K miles is not at all impossible. An aftermarket clutch (like the stage 1) may chatter if it is designed for hard use and must be heated to operate effectively (will chatter cold). A cheap clutch with weak springs may also chatter. Many clutches use elastomers to aid in longevity but I have shyed away from the if the OEM did't utilize them.
If you are considering ~$300 my personal choice would be to go with the OEM variety.


I have also used Luk with success and Koyo bearings.if you are looking under $200


Be sure to resurface your flywheel clean all oils off the pressure plate when installing and use new hardware if applicable.
 

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The "chatter" that people refer to when speaking of a clutch is when the clutch is engaged (usually starting out). It can be as forcefull as wheel hop when a tire spins (although it is not spinning with clutch chatter).

A clutch can last a very long time if it is driven sensibly (relatively flat terrain also helps)an a 150K mi is not at all impossible. An aftermarket clutch (like the stage 1) mak chatter if it is designed for hard use and must be heated to operate effectively (will chatter cold). A cheap clutch with weak springs may also chatter. Many clutches use elastomers to aid in longevity.
If you are considering ~$300 my personal choice would be to go with the OEM variety.


I have also used Luk with success and Koyo bearings.if you are looking under $200


Be sure to resurface your flywheel and use new hardware if applicable.
Thank you for the information that was helpful. I am still young and learning.
I have bought a new transmission to just replace it while I'm at it for whatever my issue has been with the gears.
I have also read the the shift linkage isnt very good in these cars, would you recommend replacing that while I'm there too? Money isnt as big of an issue currently since I will be using my tax return for this.

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Thank you for the information that was helpful. I am still young and learning.
I have bought a new transmission to just replace it while I'm at it for whatever my issue has been with the gears.
I have also read the the shift linkage isnt very good in these cars, would you recommend replacing that while I'm there too? Money isnt as big of an issue currently since I will be using my tax return for this.

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We are all new at some point. I am happy to volunteer my opinions for what they are worth.


I am not a fan of just replacing parts generally. I have moved to the test and verify camp but there are some thing that I will just replace due to time or cost. Time these days is worth more than most things.
When you are taking the old tranaxle out make sure the linkage is working properly (it may be the issue you are having with the gears). If it appears to be okay then reuse it. I would probably buy new bushings at the very least so it feels crisp again.


Put some good grease on the new pilot bearing rollers. No grease on the transmission splines (it can migrate to the clutch disk) and put some grease (or anti-seize) on the inside of the release (throw out) bearing (if there is an inner grove fill it with grease or anti-seize) and the front bearing retainer surrounding the transmission input shaft so the clutch pedal slides smooth when you depress the clutch. Don't go crazy with the grease just a light even coat. It shouldn't build up as the release bearing moves along the sleeve.
 
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