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Discuss the AWD system that Mazda chose for the Speed6

Compare the good and the bad to other companies that also have AWD cars
 

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Discuss the AWD system that Mazda chose for the Speed6

Compare the good and the bad to other companies that also have AWD cars
[/b]
100%front:0% rear on normal driving. at slippage the computer sends 50% tq to the rear wheels. it is the same system the evo9 uses, minus the yaw rate sensors which allow the evo9 to distribute more tq to the outside rear wheel upon corner, allowing it to "cut" into turns more. its a very good awd system. no as good as a subaru which is normal 50:50 and variable from there. but for mpg and highway runs the 100:0 is better.
overall the awd system has the same type variable system as the evo9 does, performance driving, snow, wet, it senses slippage and then picks the best program at that point, the evo9 is driver controlled.

its a good awd system.
 

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100%front:0% rear on normal driving. at slippage the computer sends 50% tq to the rear wheels. it is the same system the evo9 uses, minus the yaw rate sensors which allow the evo9 to distribute more tq to the outside rear wheel upon corner, allowing it to "cut" into turns more. its a very good awd system. no as good as a subaru which is normal 50:50 and variable from there. but for mpg and highway runs the 100:0 is better.
overall the awd system has the same type variable system as the evo9 does, performance driving, snow, wet, it senses slippage and then picks the best program at that point, the evo9 is driver controlled.

its a good awd system.
[/b]

Our differential does the same thing, it distributes the torque to the wheel with the higher traction. We have a 'super-LSD'.

The AWD doesn't engage when 'slip' is sensed, if that were the case the DSC would take over before the AWD would engage. It's engaged as soon as you begin to move.
 

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Nice summary indeed. Maybe one small downfall of the torque split awd system mazda uses is the lack of a center differential, thus making it necessary to pulse the rear diff on and off to keep from binding.

On a more forum friendly note, this has been discussed ad nauseum...search some more and you'll find all the info you need.
 

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When do we know (while drivin') that 4WD will kick in? i've read the
owners manual, it wasn't stated that when the 4WD light iluminates,
4WD is on, infact if you see it light up, you should go to the Dealership....
 

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When do we know (while drivin') that 4WD will kick in? i've read the
owners manual, it wasn't stated that when the 4WD light iluminates,
4WD is on, infact if you see it light up, you should go to the Dealership....
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The coupler will send power to the rear wheels whenever the ECU decides that the power that the engine is producing is more than what the front tires alone can handle. From personal experience only, I am pretty sure that the only time that the rear is not getting power is when rolling at a constant speed. I say this because every time I accelerate from a stop or slow roll I get no wheelspin which is exactly what would happen if it were only putting power to the front wheels.

The 4WD light is nothing more than an idiot light for telling the driver something is wrong.
 

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The 4WD light is nothing more than an idiot light for telling the driver something is wrong.
[/b]
Thx for verifyin'.....2 nites ago i was doin' donut in a snowy parkin' lot....
and i was hopin' to see the 4WD light to come onso that
i know the 4WD is kicking in....but it didn't iluminate, and i thought
i have a broken rear axle already, car was only 3 weeks old!

anyhow, thx for verifying
 

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...... Maybe one small downfall of the torque split awd system mazda uses is the lack of a center differential, thus making it necessary to pulse the rear diff on and off to keep from binding.
[/b]
i suspect the pulse frequency is high enough at the pre-clutch to provide a steady pressure at the primary clutch via the cam rams. this would expain rear end noise on hiway hat stops when e-brake is applied and the the dutycycle drops to zero.
 

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100%front:0% rear on normal driving. at slippage the computer sends 50% tq to the rear wheels. it is the same system the evo9 uses, minus the yaw rate sensors which allow the evo9 to distribute more tq to the outside rear wheel upon corner, allowing it to "cut" into turns more. its a very good awd system. no as good as a subaru which is normal 50:50 and variable from there. but for mpg and highway runs the 100:0 is better.
overall the awd system has the same type variable system as the evo9 does, performance driving, snow, wet, it senses slippage and then picks the best program at that point, the evo9 is driver controlled.

its a good awd system.
[/b]

Its not the same as what the EVO uses... Not even remotely close by any stretch of imagination.

search for explaination... or maybe sombody else can explain
 

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i suspect the pulse frequency is high enough at the pre-clutch to provide a steady pressure at the primary clutch via the cam rams. this would expain rear end noise on hiway hat stops when e-brake is applied and the the dutycycle drops to zero. [/b]
This makes sense...can someone confirm? Also, how does the car scrub off the difference between the two separate cornering radii of the front and rear axles...as in going around a big sweeper while the awd is engaged.
 

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delete
 

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OK I did some research and found this thread on the MazdaTech forum that is very interesting and it might answer some of the questions regarding the AWD system on the Mazdaspeed6.
From what I read and understood I believe the AWD system is working at all time except when at very low speed (i.e parking) its electronically controlled by a module that determines the amount of torque split taking in considerations many variable like Diff. Oil Temp. Yaw rate, wheel steer, 4-wheel speed, etc..

Read up on this.

http://forum.mazda6tech.com/about4221.html
 

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This makes sense...can someone confirm? Also, how does the car scrub off the difference between the two separate cornering radii of the front and rear axles...as in going around a big sweeper while the awd is engaged.
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The awd is not all or nothing. Duty cycle control allows the magnitude of rear wheel torque to be varied, when front wheels want to spin. It may well only "lock up" on loose gravel or snow, due to rw torque limitation at the coupler. This would be the advertised 50:50 mode, which otherwise would be difficult to achieve with an elec controlled center coupler.

On the sweeper at steady speed, base wheel speed difference is limited and some low rear wheel torque is delivered. No tire binding, all are pulling. just some slip in the rear clutch and heat. Now add heavy throttle and fronts want to spin, so higher duty cycle, more rw torque, coupler slips at higher torque for more heat, and some lsd rear action. Still not locked-up, unless you are in a 4 wheel drift with all tires spinning.

This awd workswell as it kick in mostly when fronts want to spin faster than rears ... strait wot drag racing and big fast corners taken hard.
 

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Well to be fair a true center differential would perform much better under power in tight turns or long sweepers.
 
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