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Discussion Starter #1
I suspect an oversight ... Pur 1050 type PCV must go threaded side UP as shown, to purge crankcase air with engine vacuum as it is designed to do.

Backward, it still will allow vapor to escape the rear valve cover under moderate load conditions. But it will block flow at idle or high vac or mabe very high load and rpms.

This pcv valve is for a 2.7L V6, so it should likely work ok installed properly, but someone needs to install it properly and make sure idle and light load transitions are ok.


Intrepid oem part installed:

http://www.dodgeintrepid.net/forums/showth...=heat+exchanger
 

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I suspect an oversight ... Pur 1050 type PCV must go threaded side UP as shown, to purge crankcase air with engine vacuum as it is designed to do.

Backward, it still will allow vapor to escape the rear valve cover under moderate load conditions. But it will block flow at idle or high vac or mabe very high load and rpms.

This pcv valve is for a 2.7L V6, so it should likely work ok installed properly, but someone needs to install it properly and make sure idle and light load transitions are ok.
Intrepid oem part installed:

http://www.dodgeintrepid.net/forums/showth...=heat+exchanger[/b]
I am very confused now, as the number of posts on various threads have this differently.

The original post said threads down, so that the threads end was away from the manifold. Above says the threads up, away from the crank case.

I am assuming then that the point is to allow the gas in the crank case to escape to the manifold which means that you should be able to check by blowing from the non-threaded end and air should flow, but no air should be allowed to flow from the threaded end to ensure that air from the intake does not flow to the crankcase.

Can someone comment on my thinking. Please and thanks
 

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anyone else have any input!!!!??


This seems like a VERY CRUCIAL point that is not really adressed. There are like 10 pages of ppl asking what models are affected but no definitive answer on what way the valve should be installed ( which is MUCH more important)
 

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Nope, no arrow indicating direction..

We're talking about installing a second PCV, a non factory one, as a secondary.
 

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Why are you installing a second one? I must have missed a topic along the way...LOL

I suppose the direction that you can blow throw it should go into the crank case side.

BTW you can clean up old PCV valves if they arnt in terrible shape with carb spray and air...
 

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I brought this very question up in a thread a while back, but nobody acknowledged it. So I never bothered adding the extra PCV.

The stock PCV is cheap, but I replace mine every 25,000 or so to be on the safe side. I think its around $10. Then I just check the oil regularly. So far no issues whatsoever.
 

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Why are you installing a second one? I must have missed a topic along the way...LOL

I suppose the direction that you can blow throw it should go into the crank case side.

BTW you can clean up old PCV valves if they arnt in terrible shape with carb spray and air...[/b]
Because the factory unit fails very quickly and the factory PCV valve is very hard to remove without breaking it. So I devised a secondary PCV valve to prevent oil devouring. I honestly cannot remember which way it goes, I haven't had the 6 in over a year and I remember being confused when I wrote the article.

The intake manifold and the crankcase both generate vacuum, they vary depending on conditions, which is how the PCV valve operates. When the intake manifold vacuum is greater, it pulls the diaphram in the PCV valve up, opening it and allowing hydrocarbons to enter the intake and be burned off in combustion. When the crankcase vacuum is greater it pulls it down and closes it off.

Or is that backwards? :laugh:

If you think it out, the PCV is to purge hydrocarbons from the crankcase.. so therefore pressure would build, thus vacuum would be greater when it needs to vent to the intake. So by that thought, the diaphram end should be facing down into the valve cover.
 

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^HAH when i installed mine i just looked at the stock one, which had three small openings arranged in a circle, and so did the threaded end of the aftermarket one, so i installed with that end facing UP.
 

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ic... I did read about people having problems with it. Has anyone tried to find one maybe that will fit, yet works better. I need to change mine, and will soon. But on my of my old cars it was just a metal tube with a crude check valve. And basically if it rattled it was ok... LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Because the factory unit fails very quickly and the factory PCV valve is very hard to remove without breaking it. So I devised a secondary PCV valve to prevent oil devouring. I honestly cannot remember which way it goes, I haven't had the 6 in over a year and I remember being confused when I wrote the article.

The intake manifold and the crankcase both generate vacuum, they vary depending on conditions, which is how the PCV valve operates. When the intake manifold vacuum is greater, it pulls the diaphram in the PCV valve up, opening it and allowing hydrocarbons to enter the intake and be burned off in combustion. When the crankcase vacuum is greater it pulls it down and closes it off.

Or is that backwards? :laugh:

If you think it out, the PCV is to purge hydrocarbons from the crankcase.. so therefore pressure would build, thus vacuum would be greater when it needs to vent to the intake. So by that thought, the diaphram end should be facing down into the valve cover.[/b]
PCV valve allows manifold vacuum, at idle or high vacuum cruising, to pull foul air from the crankcase, replacing it with air drawn from the 2nd vent hose going from the front valve cover to inlet pipe near the MAF exit.

Crankcase rarely if ever has vacuum, other than slight amount created by the small flow through the PCV valve at idle. At WOT and zero manifold pressure, piston (and valve stem) blow-by gases start filling crankcase. Most is vented through the front valve cover hose, some is vented from the rear valve cover through the oem pcv, which becomes less restricted at low manifold vaccum.

The Purolator 1050 is designed for the Interped V6 ... look at the pics in 1st post and notes below the pics ... oem Intrepid pcv threaded end into intake manifold.

Looking at the 1050 valve, at a parts store, the silver floating disc inside, at the smooth end, will act like a check valve and not allow flow out the smooth end. All pcv's are not like this, but this one is. If this end goes toward the intake manifold, it will not draw crankcase gases out at idle, nor allow some to escape through it at wot ... it's like just plugging that line. All crankcase venting will be through just the front valve cover path. Just not as effective as using the rear valve cover pcv-valve path too.
 
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