Mazda 6 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 155 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, now for something more interresting to talk about than blown engines and CEL codes. It has taken me almost a year and 3 different variations, but I can finally say I have a functioning SUPERCHARGER on a Mazda6 V6. I am currently limiting boost to 5 psi, but OH what fun is the low end torque.This is NOT the "kit" discussed to no end on the "Supercharger" thread, but rather a do it yourself project that I developed from used parts and E-bay components.

The hardest part about this project was finding space to mount the charger and drive it without having to do extensive mods to the engine and hood. The answer? Mount the supercharger remotely down below the air conditioner pump. Once that was decided, the rest was a fairly straight forward plumbing project. Don't get me wrong, there was still a lot of work to figure out and get done and this is not a project for the faint of heart. The key components that make it fit are my MSDS headers and the routing of the exhaust on 06-08 engines. This would not work on 03-05 engines.

The basic steps to the project were as follows:
1 - Purchase and install manifold pressure/vacuum, air/fuel ratio and fuel pressure gauges to monitor engine performance.
2 - Move the battery 1/2" closer to the firewall by elongating the mount holes in the plastic battery tray and remove the corner gussets from the lower subframe. Makes more room for plumbing.
3 - Purchase and install a remount mount oil filter kit.
4 - Relocate the stock air filter box and mass air flow sensor to inside the left front fender ~ poor mans cold air intake! You would not believe how well this works!!!
5 - Purchase, refurbish and "remachine" A GM3800 M62 supercharger.
6 - Fabricate mount bracket and custom plumbing parts.
7 - Purchase new serpentine belt, idler pulley, recirculation/blow-off valve and 2.75" air tube plumbing parts.
8 - Put it all together.

In this first post I'm going to cover the supercharger rework and mounting.

(See pictures) The supercharger started life as a GM3800 series/Eaton M62 with 1 liter displacement per revolution, cost $180 on craigslist. This thing weighs around 26 pounds stock. First order of business was to tear it completly a part to get down to the main housing. I then proceeded to attack it with a 4-1/2" cut off wheel and a die grinder. I removed around 9 pounds of quality Detroit aluminum and reduced it back down to its basic structure. After I was happy with the shape of things I welded on a short length of 2.75" tube to make connecting things easy.

The next step was to actually figure out a mount. The most obvious attach points were the front 3 oil pan bolts and the A/C ompressor mounts. I also had to remove the gusset from the corner of the subframe. Then using an old piece of laminate flooring, I fabbed up a crude mount bracket. After a few test fittings and the addition of an idler pulley from NAPA, things looked pretty good. What you see in the last photo is the final laser burned 7 gage polished stainless steel mount bracket.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
After perfecting the plan for mounting the supercharger it was time to commit and install instrumentation and figure out the plumbing.

Installing the three gauges was a big step. As you can see in the first picture, I went with the center console pod and I must say this was the most difficult part of the entire project. Fishing wires thru the firewall and up thru the cramped dash is a real pain. Not to mention there are about 100 ways to royally screw up your wiring and interior. All the gauges work perfectly and I like the way they look. Having the air/fuel ratio is an absolute must. I'm not going to go into any more detail on this because there are several other DIY threads about it elsewhere on this forum.

Designing the plumbing is not hard, you just need to figure out what pieces you need to get from point A to point B and then buy or make the tube sections. I bought all my tubing, silicone couplers and clamps from CX Racing. They have an incredible selection, great prices and excellent service. My starting point was the inlet to the supercharger. In the second picture you can see the new section of 2.75" tube I welded onto the remachined supercharger body. You can also see how the shape of the inlet perfectly matches and wraps around the MSDS header pipe. There is between 1/4" - 3/8" clearance and the paint on the supercharger is yet to discolor after about 3 month of driving. I first mocked it up in all 3" tubing, and actually did the first test spin-up only to relize that my set-up was not going to work. I tried to control it like a turbo only to find out that the instantaneous boost at any rpm would snuff out the engine.

Back to the drawing board and a complete plumbing redo. I switched to all 2.75" tubing except for a few tight elbows and decided to go a little redneck. It was obvious from the start that the stock airbox/MAF sensor set-up was going to have to move in order to make room for the new tubing. I had messed around with a couple cold air intake type of set-ups, but just wasn't happy. Combine that with all the troubles you read on the forum about CAI/MAF issues and I decided I would be miles ahead if I could some how use the stock airbox/MAF sensor. The solution is both redneck and completely elegant...put the complete stock airbox inside the front fender. After stripping out the stock intake resonator parts, I fabricated the flexible bracket you can see in the third picture. Then I cut off all the extra junk hanging off the stock filter box and mounted it vertically. Install the filter, snap on the cover and wha la, filter in a fender. The best part of this is that I fabbed up a tube section between it and the stock throttle body from some of the unused 3" tubing so I can use it like a cold air intake when I'm doing work on the supercharger. THIS WORKS INCREDIBLY WELL! I HAVE HAD ZERO CEL'S OF ANY KIND AND THE PERFORMANCE GAIN FROM IT ALONE IS SUBSTANTIAL!!!!! It was almost a shame to install the supercharger.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Noob Saibot

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
A couple more notes before we get to final installation. As you can see in the first picture, I decided I better install a remote oil filter system if I wanted to be able to change my oil filter. Probably a good thing ehh? I liked the way TheGreatNY did it for his twin turbo set-up, so I pretty much copied him and put it up along side the plastic radiator frame. IMPORTANT NOTE - If you decide to do this be ABSOLUTELY sure NOTHING rubs against the hoses. I was in a hurry when I did mine and missed one tiny little rub up against the right radiator fan framework. The pressure from the oil pump causes these hoses to try to straighten out and made it rub even worse during driving. After about 3 weeks a tiny pin hole wore thru and BURST while driving down the highway. :eek: You would not believe the size of the cloud of smoke that expensive synthetic oil can make when sprayed directly on a header pipe or how low your heart can sink when you know your engines precious life blood is rapidly going bye bye. I lost 3.5 quarts in the time it took for my brain to register the situation, pull off the road and shut the engine down. The "low oil pressure" light never came on and after correcting the hose problem and topping of the oil everything was fine.

During the oil trauma I also decided to gut the air conditioning system off the car. It had been damaged beyond economical repair during one of the engines swaps attempted before I owned the car. I removed the compressor, evaporator and all the lines back to the firewall. I had already fabbed a support bracket that went from the supercharger up to one of the compressor bolts, so now I had to make a new bracket that went all the way up to the side of the block. I just wanted to mention this because in some of my pictures the AC compressor is there and in others it is gone. Its removal was not necessary for the supercharger install and the only difference it makes is the length of the new serpentine belt.

Well, now for the part you have been waiting for.....final installation.
The final layout goes as follows;
- air enters in thru the stock airfilter/MAF housing mounted in the wheel well
- it travels up around a vertical 90 degree turn at which point it passes thru the relocated throttle body/butterfly valve
- the air duct then turns 90 degrees down and then 90 degrees horizontal and travels horizontaly over to the supercharger inlet
- the air exits the top side of the supercharger and travels horizontaly along side the transmission and then 90 degrees up and into the engine manifold
- there is a recirculation/blowoff valve that links between the boost and inlet side that opens when manifold vacuum is below 5 or pressure is above 5.

As you can see in the second picture, the first thing to do is remove the throttle body and replace it with a custom tube adapter. Then it is time to bolt on the supercharger. In the third and forth pictures you can see the charger ready to go on with some of the outlet plumbing already installed. Using a jack to raise it makes this way easier. The fifth picture shows the rest of the pressure side plumbing and recirc valve installed. Next I attach the inlet downtube to the backside of the throttle body and attach the whole thing to the tube coming in from the air filter. Picture seven shows the completed plumbing after installing the rest of the inlet tube down to the charger and the small recirc hose. Picture eight shows the new support strut going up to the side of the block where the AC compressor used to be. After installing a longer serpentine belt from NAPA, it is ready to run. Total install time - 1-1/2 hours.

In the next post I plan to show more installed pictures, so if there is something specific you want to see just let me know. I may not get to it until the weekend though.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Noob Saibot

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Here are some more pictures of the installation. Yes, it hangs low, but not stupid low. I may fab a belt cover yet. I thought I may have trouble in the rain with belt slip, but it doesn't seem to be a problem. I do however, plan to remove the the system for the winter because of the snow banks, ice chunks and road salt we have here in Michigan.

I did forget to mention that the relocation of the throttlebody ment the existing wire harness would not reach. I either had to cut and extend the harness or come up with some sort of extension. Luckily I had the complete engine harness and throttlebody from my old engine. I stripped out the necessary wiring and plug from the old harness and cut the plastic plug section out of the cover on the old throttlebody. A little soldier, shrink tube and high temp RTV and I had a sweet 18" extension cord.

Well that's my story to date. My total cost is just under $1000, but I also bought a lot of 3" plumbing and tubing parts I did not use. If I had to duplicate it right now, it would be around $750, depending on what gauges I used and how cheap I could find another used SC. There are new SC's that would fit and make more boost, but my budget was limited to $1000 and I really didn't want to get into tuning. I did the project to show you can still hop-up a "modern" engine without breaking the bank and just for the fun of it. If you would like to take it for a test drive, I'm in west Michigan, come on by. On to my next project...converting a crashed 2001 Suzuki SV650 into a fully inclosed reverse trike to see if I can get 80 mpg. :drive:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts
Interesting build. It would appear that the blower will run cooler (suffer less heat soak) at that low location. Likely a good thing because an intercooler is not in the system yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Interesting build. It would appear that the blower will run cooler (suffer less heat soak) at that low location. Likely a good thing because an intercooler is not in the system yet.
Haha...I was thinking just the opposite! Being directly next to the oil pan and block and directly below the header, I would think allot of heat soak....but who knows!

I will say this though, you get a HUGE "A" for creativity and outside-the-box thinking. Ive never seen anything like this before. I sure do hope that with the extreme mass removal you dont run into structural/rigidity issues or distortions from heat. Superchargers generate a fair amount of internal heat.

Is it just the camera angle, or does it sit quite a bit lower than the oil pan? Do you have or suspect any clearance issues?

I will watch this one closely ;)
 

·
Administrator
2018 Mazda6 GT Reserve
Joined
·
8,531 Posts
Sub'd. I'm quite interested at how this all turns out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
I had always considered doing the same, but on the other side off the water pump pulley.
Interesting. Wouldn't you be concerned about all the added load that driving a supercharger adds to the camshaft? I would be afraid of lots of torsional twist and harmonic vibrations from the pumping action that would in the best case likely effect cam timing and in the worst case, perhaps cause the camshaft to fail.
 

·
banana boat.
Joined
·
6,987 Posts
I had planned on having a lower pulley added making the belt go from a triangle to a square design which in theory should reduce variations.

Lower mounts as TK did are very common in the 4v world, though usually exhaust powered Turbo setups(which he could have easily done as well and i believe how justin is layed out)

I'm not a huge fan of S/C as they are parasitic in nature, but they are cheap to access. back in the 240 guys used to go to Mercedes and pick up C230 S/Cs brand new for ~250 bucks and make a couple of adapters and run.

Also, Adding a TMIC or SMIC would not be impossible and would be advised if plan to bump the PSI anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
I had planned on having a lower pulley added making the belt go from a triangle to a square design which in theory should reduce variations.
Again, interesting concept. Im curious how strong the camshaft material is and how it would withstand the load torsionally. I am just visualizing it looking like a Twizzler (exagerated of course) and skewing the cam timing progressively from front to back. Are those cams pretty robust or cheap? Are they hollow or solid-core? If hollow, I wouldnt even consider it. The top fuel guys tried hollow cams to save some weight...with disasterous results from the torsional twisting and variance of cam timing....thus my question. I know this is a very different beast of course....but I have spent FAR too much time with engineers over the years and can visualize way too much for my own damned good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
585 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Haha...I was thinking just the opposite! Being directly next to the oil pan and block and directly below the header, I would think allot of heat soak....but who knows!

I will say this though, you get a HUGE "A" for creativity and outside-the-box thinking. Ive never seen anything like this before. I sure do hope that with the extreme mass removal you dont run into structural/rigidity issues or distortions from heat. Superchargers generate a fair amount of internal heat.

Is it just the camera angle, or does it sit quite a bit lower than the oil pan? Do you have or suspect any clearance issues?

I will watch this one closely ;)
Heat soak is a non issue. I can drive to work 1/2 hour and immediately hold my hand on the supercharger and plumbing after parking. Temps here in Michigan are in the mid 80's right now and I would guess the surface is at most 105 degrees F. Stainless steel is a very poor conductor of heat so the bracket and spacers act as a thermal isolator. I'm sure it also helps that 99% of the time the recirculation valve is open and the charger is operating in a vacuum doing basically zero work.

Yes it sits low, but not as low as it looks. The bottom surface is still above the bottom of my air dam lip. I am still very careful around curbs and speed bumps though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Heat soak is a none issue. I can drive to work 1/2 hour and immediately hold my hand on the supercharger and plumbing after parking.
Good deal! As I said before, I am interested as the others are to see and hear more on this. You definitely get the vote for going the extra mile!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,733 Posts
Lower mounts as TK did are very common in the 4v world
there just as common in the v6 mazda world too. the KL guys have been mounting there superchargers there for the last decade. ;) cept they prefer the clutched MB superchargers for better fitment.

if anyone else ever wants to do this, i have a pristine M90 supercharger laying around from my old explorer still id be willing to sell. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Well.....I guess I should come out of my cave more often then and look around ;)
 
1 - 20 of 155 Posts
Top