Mazda 6 Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I a'm not even nearly a professional. I may do some simple tasks myself though. I have Mazda 6 2.0 gas 2016. The car has worked nearly fine so far.

The main problem with the car are the temperature and moisture related: when the temperature gets below 10 celcius (50 fahrenheit) the consumption goes from 7 l/100km to even 11 l/100km. Another symptom is that car "feels" not that powerfull as it does during the summer temperatures. This change is easy to feel.

I became curious about this. So I turned the power consumption meter on. The temperature was 15 celcius. I realized that consumption is high the first 20 minutes when driving the motor way. Then it drops to normal level.

The temperature meter in my car is blue light on (cool) and off (warm) motor. It switches off in 3 - 5 minutes from the start.

Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I forgot: during the winter it is could here: from zero to -30 celcius. At this time the consumption is high (11 l/100km) all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
Hello,

I have no experience with the 2.0L, but at -30c with my 2.5L Turbo, I get worst than 11 L/100Km on city driving. Have a look at my fuelly profile in my signature.

It's normal for a cold engine to consume more gas until it's up to it's operating temperature. And at -30c, it takes some time to get there.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I think I can answer your question with some degree of accuracy. in the cooler temps, your car takes longer to warm up to operating temperature, what's usually not indicated on the dash is oil temperature. OIl is quite a bit thicker when cold, and even though the Coolant temp shows normal, your oil takes longer to warm up. So the first off the thick oil is creating drag on your engine, reducing efficiency, and idling to warm everything up takes a long time further degrading efficiency. Another factor is fuel, oil companies change the fuel during the winter months to make it less likely to freeze I think, or perhaps other reasons. I don't know the schedule of these changes but I know it happens. One thing you can do, if it isn't required already, is change your oil to a more winter friendly grade,(ie. if you normally use 5w30 change to 0w30) but I think most cars these days already require 0w20, so there it is cars be less efficient in the cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
800 Posts
One thing you can do, if it isn't required already, is change your oil to a more winter friendly grade,(ie. if you normally use 5w30 change to 0w30) but I think most cars these days already require 0w20, so there it is cars be less efficient in the cold.
Uh, no. You obviously dont understand how oil grades work.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top