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Hi allI recently bought a black katano. 07 cheap as chips only 58k on the clock one elderly owner, they didn't address the rust issue on the rear wheel arch at the bottom , it's unsightly and obviously going to just get worse, I didn't want to pay an exorbitant price in a body shop as its only a cheap car but I want to have a go myself , I've so far bought isopon body filler
, wire brushes, various grit sandpaper, Kurust, 3 cans of high build primer, and can of ebony mica spray plus lacquer tac cloths aluminium mesh as It has a crack and masking tape , anything else I've forgotten please ? I don't expect a brilliant job but this will be practice and surely I can't bodge it up that much ? I was told having it cut out and welding new part is best but I'm not going down that route , been watching YouTube vids so have to clean the arches inside with a hose pipe etc and carry on , not doing yet as rubbish weather ,
On another subject I bought the car a few weeks ago the first day the alarm went off, I sprayed locks with wd40 and now 2 weeks later it went off again as car drove close by it ?
 

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Mind you having read stories on the forum it seems a losing battle , putting grease on inner arch seems a reasonable idea ?
 

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That whole matter of the interior rust issue, of the rear wheelhouses to rear quarterpanels... is one I am personally concerned about (and want to mitigate). As you are in the UK, perhaps you call the rear quarterpanel / fender a "wing"? In anycase, the inner-fender (wheelhouse) and the outer "fender/quarter-panel" meet with a "flanged" connection, with a series of spot-welds that follow that "wheel-lip". One of the worst areas for rust is the rear-most spot of same... typically (visually, exterior-wise) - where the rear (plastic) bumper cover meets the externally-visible sheet metal. Call that the most forward-point of the rear bumper cover. The other area is the one where you found corrosion... the most forward (and lowest) point of the "dog-leg". Seems to me that condensation forms in this boxed-in cavity... and corrosion occurs in this crevasse. My solution to prevent it from happening is to drill, say, 3/4" holes in the inner fender... near this joint (subsequently to be plugged with "flush-plugs"... whereupon rustproofing material can be introduced to this joint... through those access holes. I call for these holes because I believe this area is inaccessible, boxed-in. You are fortunate to live in the UK... and you can get Bilt-Hamber S-50 interior cavity protector... the one with the best reputation out there. It also comes with a very long flexible wand... that can be inserted all the way forward down the dog-leg.

I would undertake the S-50 treatment ONLY after you complete your body work, and have definitely left time for all of the materials to properly dry. Then, with this Bilt Hamber treatment you can be assured that the best possible life-expectancy for your repairs will be achieved. Even with this, the repairs may not last a whole lot of time. It is worth a try, though.

Cheers.
 
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