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Hello everyone,

I bought this mazda 6 2014 model and the battery runs out every 1.5 years or 2 years... does anyone else face this problem???
 

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In a tropical country like ours, warranty is up to two years. Most probably than not, the battery will fail. It is like magic that right after the warranty, it won't work anymore!

What I do is, I charge my battery once in a while using CTEK. I have yet to confirm if the battery can last for 3 years.
 

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How often do you use the car, and for how long on average do you use it? Short, frequent trips aren't going to help the battery last compared to long ones.

My battery lasted over 5 years before I had to replace it because it, quite literally, ran out of juice. It was semi-transparent and I could see the fluid was below operable level.
 

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Most batteries are in fact water-consuming. If the level of the electrolyte ever drops below the top of the plates the battery will be almost-instantly ruined as it will short one of the cells and then you're done. The hotter it is the more boiling-off takes place and the less of that vapor will condense and drip back into the cell.

While they may be labeled "maintenance free" that's nonsense -- just like a so-called "lifetime" transmission fluid. It sure is lifetime -- for the lifetime of the transmission! Likewise for the battery.

Every three to six months pop the caps off (yes, they do come off) and look. There's typically a plastic protrusion into the electrolyte so you can see exactly where the level is. If the electrolyte is not up to the protrusion add distilled water only to replace what has been boiled off. NEVER, EVER put tap or "drinking" water in a battery -- only distilled. Then replace caps. And DO wear goggles and gloves while doing this; batteries are full of sulfuric acid and even the tiniest amount that gets in your eye can do permanent damage and ANY of the liquid that gets on your skin will burn you. If even ONE DROP of that electrolyte gets on anything once you replace the caps flush the entire area with LOTS of water to get it out there; it will promote serious corrosion of anything metal.

The only exception is an AGM battery which is sealed; those have an electrolyte combiner in them that will, to a point, prevent electrolyte loss but any sort of overcharge will cause them to vent and once they do there's nothing you can do about it.

Note that starting batteries in cars are VERY badly damaged by deep discharges. Even ONE discharge below 50% of capacity will permanently and severely impact its service life. The design of these batteries is optimized for a lot of current delivery for a very short period of time to start the car, and nothing else. If you are sitting with the vehicle in "Accessory" (e.g. engine not running while playing the stereo, etc) you're abusing the battery and severely shortening its life. If you do this on a regular basis one of the better investments you can make is to rewrite the accessories in question (e.g. your stereo) to be on their battery, preferably an AGM deep-cycle (which is non-spillable and thus can be put wherever you want, say, in the trunk) and install a combiner so when the engine is running it charges, but when you shut down it's electrically isolated from the starting battery. If you can't or don't want to do that and don't live in a place with below-freezing temperatures and alternative is to install a deep-cycle (e.g. marine trolling) battery instead of a standard starting battery of the same group size and terminal configuration. It will NOT be able to deliver the same number of amps for starting, so if you live in a cold area DO NOT DO THIS or you may find the car won't start in the middle of the winter -- but it will tolerate deeper discharges without as much damage. Note that I said "as much" -- even a deep-cycle battery doesn't like deep discharge, but it won't be immediately trashed by it.

Here in the South 3 years is a decent service life for a car starting battery; in more-moderate climates you will likely get somewhat more, but in the north the gating factor on replacement will likely be the -20F morning when you NEED all of the designed cranking amps and just don't have them, and thus your car won't start in the frozen wasteland.
 

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My 2004 battery has lasted 27 months as a record. I routinely keep the cell electrolyte topped off.
My solution was to buy a battery at Costco. If the battery goes dead (or performs below customer expectations) they replace it (Interstate) at no charge and the warranty begins new. The warranty beginning new, for another multi-year interval, off the original purchase is generally unheard of. I sold batteries for 10 years for three different companies and this would have bankrupted each of them. Electrical demands are high on modern cars. The days of getting seven years out of your OEM Panasonic or Johnson Controls battery are long gone.
 

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2 years is about normal battery life here in southern Arizona. Heat is the worst thing for lead-acid batteries.

I agree with the suggestion to check and top off the cells with distilled water. You might also consider the type of battery maintainer that will automatically desulfate the battery.
 

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BTW Walmart's car batteries are made by Johnson Controls :)

I have them in all three vehicles in my driveway/garage. In my experience they last just as long as anyone else's.....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
How often do you use the car, and for how long on average do you use it? Short, frequent trips aren't going to help the battery last compared to long ones.

My battery lasted over 5 years before I had to replace it because it, quite literally, ran out of juice. It was semi-transparent and I could see the fluid was below operable level.
I use my car everyday to work, i drive around like 120 KM per day
 

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BTW Walmart's car batteries are made by Johnson Controls :)

I have them in all three vehicles in my driveway/garage. In my experience they last just as long as anyone else's.....
SOME of Walmart's batteries are still made by Johnson Controls. Last time I checked a large majority wasn't JC. I think they were Exide.
 

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I still have my original battery on my '14 when I purchased it new in the fall of '13. I noticed it getting a little weak last winter, so will probably get a new one before this winter. Have done zero maintenance to the battery.
 

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Yep -- the difference between current required to start the car when the overnight temps went into the 40s and 50s .vs. when it's in the 60s and 70s is quite significant. It gets worse (by a lot!) when the temperatures go below freezing. In addition to that the maximum current the battery can deliver goes down with decreases in temperature irrespective of battery condition (it's a chemical reaction that provides the power, and chemical reactions are all to some degree temperature-sensitive.)

When my OE Panasonic failed I got some warning as I had a close to no-start condition on a cool morning. That was enough for me -- out came the battery! :)

BTW I get about 3-3.5 years out of my UPS batteries too -- same chemistry, but SLA (sealed AGMs) before the self test routine that the UPS runs every couple weeks throws up on them and says "buy new ones OR ELSE!" :)
 

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I have a
Hello everyone,

I bought this mazda 6 2014 model and the battery runs out every 1.5 years or 2 years... does anyone else face this problem???
I have a 2015, original battery still. Drive it daily, does your sit alot?
 

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Batteries for high-temperature climates need to built differently internally than what North America is accustomed to these days. Mostly we get batteries that are better at delivering plenty of starting current in a fairly small package during cold weather.

Hot-weather batteries are available, but few sellers have a clue.
 

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@tickerguy
I got inspired to check the battery yesterday and I found this on the negative terminal:

237712


I poured water and wiped it clean. I remember many years ago, what we do is remove the terminal and then clean it. I didn't do it that way as I was about to go yesterday.

My question is, what does it indicate on the condition of the battery and why does it happen?
 

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It is not a battery condition indicator. Clean after taking the cable off so that you don't generate a connection problem, then seal it up after reassembly. You can buy spray sealers at the auto parts stores, or you can do what the manual says and just put some petroleum jelly over them.
 

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Just my 2 cents. My original battery lasted about 110k miles and ~6 years and I also got an interstate battery from Costco to replace it. I dont know that it matters, but I would wipe the top of my battery down with a slightly damp paper towel once every couple oil changes to clean off the built up grime (without touching the actual posts, of course). I reasoned that it might improve the life of the battery by reducing parasiting draining due to all the dirt creating a high resistance connection between the posts. I probably cleaned the battery twice a year this way. I live in TN though and the climate is relatively tame, lows of around 15 and highs of around 95 are about as extreme as it gets.
 

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It is not a battery condition indicator. Clean after taking the cable off so that you don't generate a connection problem, then seal it up after reassembly. You can buy spray sealers at the auto parts stores, or you can do what the manual says and just put some petroleum jelly over them.
Now I remember, the guy in the dealership removed the battery terminal. Perhaps it wasn't tight enough and so I assume that is the cause of that "salt buildup". In a way, it can be said that is a battery condition indicator, it tells you that the terminal isn't tight enough. Am I right?

I remember Vaseline and I have forgotten about it. This so called maintenance free battery spoiled me a lot that I no longer maintain it but I should because what I have isn't that type.

Another question, what could have caused this black stain inside the cover? Is this normal?

IMG_20190831_094242.jpg


I found this out when I decided to thoroughly clean the negative terminal and add about 800 mL of distilled water.
 
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