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Simply, where do you place the jack/jack stands?
is there a DIY for oil change
Mazda6 2014
Better late then never right? Highly recommend using the Mazda PE01 oil filter and a 0W20 oil of your preference.

Jack points:



ENGINE OIL REPLACEMENT [SKYACTIV-G 2.5]

WARNING:

Hot engines and engine oil can cause severe burns. Turn off the engine and wait until it and the engine oil have cooled.

A vehicle that is lifted but not securely supported on safety stands is dangerous. It can slip or fall, causing death or serious injury. Never work around or under a lifted vehicle if it is not securely supported on safety stands.

Continuous exposure to USED engine oil has caused skin cancer in laboratory mice. Protect your skin by washing with soap and water immediately after working with engine oil.

CAUTION:

If engine oil is spilled on the exhaust system, wipe it off completely. If you fail to wipe the spilled engine oil, it will produce fumes because of the heat.

1. Position the vehicle on level ground.
2. Remove the oil filler cap.
3. Remove the service hole cover (installed to front under cover No.2) used to drain the engine oil.


4. Remove the oil pan drain plug.
5. Drain the engine oil into a container.
6. Install the oil pan drain plug with a new gasket.
Oil pan drain plug tightening torque
30—41 N·m {3.1—4.1 kgf·m, 23—30 ft·lbf}

NOTE:

The amount of residual oil in the engine can vary according to factors such as the replacement method and oil temperature. Verify the oil level after engine oil replacement.

7. Refill with the following type and amount of engine oil. Engine oil specification




Engine oil viscosity
0W-20


Engine oil capacity (approx. quantity)
Oil replacement: 4.3 L {4.5 US qt, 3.8 lmp qt}

Oil and oil filter replacement: 4.5 L {4.8 US qt, 4.0 lmp qt}

Total (dry engine): 5.4 L {5.7 US qt, 4.8 Imp qt}

8. Install the oil filler cap.
9. Start the engine and confirm that there is no oil leakage.
If there is oil leakage, repair or replace the applicable part.

10. Inspect the oil level. (See ENGINE OIL LEVEL INSPECTION [SKYACTIV-G 2.5].)
11. Install the service hole cover.
 

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Jack points:

Love this graphic. Anyone know where it came from? Is it an official Mazda graphic from a shop manual or something? I don't see it in the Owner's Manual.

Just bought the 6 and the first tire rotation will be done by the dealer as part of 1st year free maintenance, but I'm preparing for after that when I'll be doing rotations / oil changes myself. I hate taking cars to tire shops for rotations. When I do it myself I know the lug nuts won't be destroyed and I can easily clean the entire backside of the wheel while it's off the car.

I like the idea (from another thread) of driving the front up on ramps before jacking up the front further to get it on jack stands. Apparently it's nearly impossible to get a jack back to the front crossmember and still have vertical room to pump the jack handle.
 

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It is basically impossible to do so, yes.

You can jack on the rail using a rubber puck or similar (distribute the load) as with the tire-change jack, then support with stands on the LARGE control arm brackets. That doesn't work if you need to do something with the front suspension components but that's an extraordinarily-beefy place to put a jackstand that can definitely take the load without a problem while you do your work.

The other alternative is to, as noted, use ramps to get the clearance to jack on the front crossmember pad but you still need to place your stands. Common jackstands on the outside rail points NEED a load spreader of some type or you're likely to roll the pinch weld area. That's where you need to put them if doing suspension work, obviously, but you will need to figure out a means to spread the load as a "bare" stand will concentrate it too much otherwise.

For an oil change I just use the ramps which are sufficient all on their own for that purpose.

Be EXTREMELY careful if you need all four wheels off the ground. Those "center" jack points are safe to use IF the other two wheels are down, but if they're not you need to be EXTREMELY careful -- it's not all that hard to put enough side or front-to-back load to topple the other end of the vehicle off the stands in that sort of situation and if you do..... Paying very close attention to the first two stands you place and how stable they are is essential if you need all 4 wheels off the ground at once.
 

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It is basically impossible to do so, yes.

You can jack on the rail using a rubber puck or similar (distribute the load) as with the tire-change jack, then support with stands on the LARGE control arm brackets. That doesn't work if you need to do something with the front suspension components but that's an extraordinarily-beefy place to put a jackstand that can definitely take the load without a problem while you do your work.

The other alternative is to, as noted, use ramps to get the clearance to jack on the front crossmember pad but you still need to place your stands. Common jackstands on the outside rail points NEED a load spreader of some type or you're likely to roll the pinch weld area. That's where you need to put them if doing suspension work, obviously, but you will need to figure out a means to spread the load as a "bare" stand will concentrate it too much otherwise.
I've been fine putting jackstands on pinch welds without bending them on several cars in the past, including my 4,800 lb Durango. I'd tend to do it carefully on the 6, monitoring it closely for signs of bending as I go. I see the scissor jack supplied with the car has a cutout to straddle the pinch weld, but it doesn't look to me like it spreads the load to the surrounding body.
 
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Be EXTREMELY careful if you need all four wheels off the ground. Those "center" jack points are safe to use IF the other two wheels are down, but if they're not you need to be EXTREMELY careful -- it's not all that hard to put enough side or front-to-back load to topple the other end of the vehicle off the stands in that sort of situation and if you do..... Paying very close attention to the first two stands you place and how stable they are is essential if you need all 4 wheels off the ground at once.
Thanks but again I've jacked up several vehicles completely off the ground using center jack points and jack stands on the pinch welds. Never had a close call but I consider myself to be "extremely careful".
 

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I use a load-spreader for the stands on the pinch welds; I have "caps" that go on top of my jackstand saddles that are notched and provides a material amount of load-spreading (although on some vehicles I've used furring strips along with them.)

Roll one of those pinchwelds and your tire-changing jack is worthless on that corner -- of course nobody ever has a flat these days, right? :)
 

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I am needing to lift my 6 so I can install my Tanabe springs, but still can't find a clear answer on how to lift this car. I have read like three thread including this one and still don't have a solid answer on how to do it safely. I would have a shop install, but it seems most of the local shops want nothing to do with installing lowering springs.
 

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I lifted the rear from pinch weld and was able to slide in the jackstand adjacent to the jack , no damage to pinch. Front is a different story, I lifted it from the pinch weld (with no load spreader on the jack) and it did cause a minor bending of the pinch.
 

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Does the bottom side that sits on the jack have some grooves to prevent slipping?
Not really worried about slippage. My jack pad is already rubber so slippage should be minimal. If I need grooves I will must make some myself in the bottom or maybe glue some sandpaper to create better traction.
 

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Those work pretty well, as does a hockey puck with a slot cut in it. The latter is good for a while but will split. No idea how long that one will last before it does.
I like the urethane material better then using a real hockey puck. The urethane seems to be a bit softer and more forgiving.
 

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Check this out. These could be dangerous.
First off the adapter I bought is a very stiff urethane and not soft like the one in the video. Also mine only has a single slit cut that is thin and not crazy wide like the ones in the video. I already tried it out and it didn't flex at all. It only needs to get the car lifted so I can get a jack stands placed.
 
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