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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2006 Mazdaspeed 6
When I say losing oil, I mean a substantial amount. At least a quart every 200 miles. I’m using Castrol edge 5w-30. I’ve read about rotella t6 to help with the fuel dilution problems, but I’m wondering if it will help with the loss of oil. I’ve also found an oil film on the inside of my intercooler piping. Wondering if anyone can point me in the right direction. Thank you. UPDATE: Come to think of it, I didn’t know what type of oil the previous owner had in this. I replaced the oil and filter a couple of days ago and no loss in oil whatsoever. Thank you everyone for the help.
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That, especially with the oil in the intercooler, is of immediate concern. If that's coming from the turbo center section you are rather likely to be pretty close to a turbo failure and those can in some cases dump enough oil into the intake the hydrolock the engine. If you're not leaking it you ARE burning it.
 

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How does the engine coolant look?
If the oil isn’t leaking or burning,the only other possibility is it’s going into the coolant trough a head gasket leak.
How long has this problem been going on?
 

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Have someone drive behind you video taping your car, when in a safe place floor it.
See if you are burning oil.....past the turbo seals or the piston rings.
Whats your mileage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That, especially with the oil in the intercooler, is of immediate concern. If that's coming from the turbo center section you are rather likely to be pretty close to a turbo failure and those can in some cases dump enough oil into the intake the hydrolock the engine. If you're not leaking it you ARE burning it.
What could be the problem then? By this I mean, what are some possibilities for it burning oil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have someone drive behind you video taping your car, when in a safe place floor it.
See if you are burning oil.....past the turbo seals or the piston rings.
Whats your mileage?
I’ve had it recorded already and didn’t see any smoke. Mileage on motor is between 45-65k
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How does the engine coolant look?
If the oil isn’t leaking or burning,the only other possibility is it’s going into the coolant trough a head gasket leak.
How long has this problem been going on?
The coolant is good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
UPDATE: Come to think of it, I didn’t know what type of oil the previous owner had in this. I replaced the oil and filter a couple of days ago and no loss in oil whatsoever. Thank you everyone for the help.
 

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What could be the problem then? By this I mean, what are some possibilities for it burning oil.
If it's coming from the turbocharger it can go both out the exhaust side and into the intake side; turbochargers do not have contact-style seals, they use centrifugal force and a labyrinth. This is why the drain back out of the turbo for its oil supply must never have any restriction; if it does then oil will be forced through the seals and into both exhaust and intake.

If center-section shaft contact occurs with wear, which usually happens due to coking (hot shutdowns cause that in particular) these tolerances can get loose; by the time you start bypassing oil to a significant degree the wear on the turbo is usually bad enough that you're into the realm where failure is possible. On a diesel it's even worse because the engine can run on the lube oil (!!) so you can get a runaway that, without a way to cut the air off, cannot be stopped (especially with an automatic transmission which can't be manually stalled out as with a stick) until the oil runs out and the engine is destroyed. That's not a factor with a gas engine but a catastrophic failure of the turbo is certainly possible even on a gas-powered car and frequently destroys the engine by dumping a huge amount of oil directly into the intake.

I would start by removing the oil fill cap at hot idle and see if you detect an abnormal amount of blow-by. If you do then you've got an internal problem. But if not, especially given that intake pipe, I'd cast aspersions on the turbocharger and take a real close look at it (pull the intake side pipe to it from the airbox and see what the wheel looks like, along with how much play you can detect in it.) You definitely do not want it to fail catastrophically on the road.

Too thin oil in a turbo vehicle can cause abnormally high consumption; if you still have problems after you're sure the correct oil in there then I would run this down aggressively. Don't try to solve it by running higher-viscosity oil; you're not losing a little here, you're losing a lot. A quart every 200 miles is getting into the realm of the old Chevy Vega engines and is definitely NOT acceptable. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Prob 5w-20.....thinned down
If it's coming from the turbocharger it can go both out the exhaust side and into the intake side; turbochargers do not have contact-style seals, they use centrifugal force and a labyrinth. This is why the drain back out of the turbo for its oil supply must never have any restriction; if it does then oil will be forced through the seals and into both exhaust and intake.

If center-section shaft contact occurs with wear, which usually happens due to coking (hot shutdowns cause that in particular) these tolerances can get loose; by the time you start bypassing oil to a significant degree the wear on the turbo is usually bad enough that you're into the realm where failure is possible. On a diesel it's even worse because the engine can run on the lube oil (!!) so you can get a runaway that, without a way to cut the air off, cannot be stopped (especially with an automatic transmission which can't be manually stalled out as with a stick) until the oil runs out and the engine is destroyed. That's not a factor with a gas engine but a catastrophic failure of the turbo is certainly possible even on a gas-powered car and frequently destroys the engine by dumping a huge amount of oil directly into the intake.

I would start by removing the oil fill cap at hot idle and see if you detect an abnormal amount of blow-by. If you do then you've got an internal problem. But if not, especially given that intake pipe, I'd cast aspersions on the turbocharger and take a real close look at it (pull the intake side pipe to it from the airbox and see what the wheel looks like, along with how much play you can detect in it.) You definitely do not want it to fail catastrophically on the road.

Too thin oil in a turbo vehicle can cause abnormally high consumption; if you still have problems after you're sure the correct oil in there then I would run this down aggressively. Don't try to solve it by running higher-viscosity oil; you're not losing a little here, you're losing a lot. A quart every 200 miles is getting into the realm of the old Chevy Vega engines and is definitely NOT acceptable. :)
Thank you so much for the help. I will definitely be monitoring my oil level closely.
 
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