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nobody bothered to service them since it's not supposed to need service "for life."


This exactly, when I'm car shopping I don't know how many conversations go as follows



Person- "everything works great but reverse (or another gear) doesn't work"

Me- "when was the last time the transmission fluid was changed?"

Person- "Transmission fluid? I didn't think you had to change that."

Me- "How many miles did you say were on the car?"

Person- "170,000(or some other astronomical amount)"

Me- (usually in my own head, but it has actually come out before) " Do we see them problem here yet?!?"
 

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Did the 1st and 2nd Gen's claim to be "life time" tranny fluid as the Gen 3 does?


I don’t know about the 2nd gen but the 1st gen didn’t necessarily say it was lifetime but the owners manual and even the fsm as far as I know don’t have a listed service interval


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2015....with 96K.
I haven't even changed the plugs yet.
The Dunlops made it to 35K and the Continentals are still going strong.
I have had to replace the rotors and pads twice.
I wished Mazda had gone with at least a 2 piston caliper.
Other than that just gas and oil.

I have an inquire to Akebono to see if they have any multi piston calipers that will just bolt on.

Next car is probably going to be a CX-5. This is my 3rd Mazda....had a B2600 4x4 too.
 

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I don’t know about the 2nd gen but the 1st gen didn’t necessary say it was lifetime but the owners manual and even the fsm as far as I know don’t have a listed service interval
Yeah, when I picked up my 2006 6s a few months ago I started planning all the maintenance that should be done at around the 100k mark (it only had 107k :) ), and found the same lack of information on the ATX fluid in the user manual and the shop manual.

I figured that was crazy and looked around on here and found most everyone recommended changing it, or at least starting the process of dumping and adding, if not earlier, then at least at 100k. So I picked up some appropriate ATX fluid and plan on doing that as soon as I get around to making my car ramps. I'll also be adding a tranny cooler and inline filter at the same time. :)
 

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Yeah, when I picked up my 2006 6s a few months ago I started planning all the maintenance that should be done at around the 100k mark (it only had 107k :) ), and found the same lack of information on the ATX fluid in the user manual and the shop manual.



I figured that was crazy and looked around on here and found most everyone recommended changing it, or at least starting the process of dumping and adding, if not earlier, then at least at 100k. So I picked up some appropriate ATX fluid and plan on doing that as soon as I get around to making my car ramps. I'll also be adding a tranny cooler and inline filter at the same time. :)


I would caution you against the in-line filter, I used a Magnifine one and found that it significantly restricted the fluid flow. I’m jealous of your mileage lol I’m at 161,650 but still no major mechanical issues :)


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I don't think they ever think about life past 100k miles, which is right around the point you should change the transmission fluid. When I was shopping for cheap early 2000's cars last year it was really common for otherwise reliable cars to have automatic transmission issues. Honda, Mazda, didn't matter. I wonder if it's because the transmissions themselves are bad it if nobody bothered to service them since it's not supposed to need service "for life."
ALL ATXes are intentionally designed in a fashion that encourages and eventually will lead to failures.

All.

Specifically the wetted area of the transmission contains friction materials (in the clutches) that inherently shed into the fluid. This is like putting brake dust in your motor oil and over time has the same sort of result.

In addition the filter is a joke compared with even full-flow (say much less bypass design) motor oil filters and is intentionally inside the case, making easy changes impossible. Would you tolerate having to drop the oil pan to change the engine oil filter? Well?

Third, they're designed (on purpose) so that draining (and thus changing) the entire fluid load is nearly impossible. Specifically, the torque converter is designed in such a fashion that it cannot be drained nor does it drain back automatically when the car is shut down and it holds a LOT of fluid. Would you tolerate an engine design that only allowed you to change 1/2 or so of the engine oil, forcing you to leave the other half of the dirty oil in the engine? Well?

And you wonder why they fail? They're designed to fail once you get into the six-digit mileage category, and avoiding those failures is difficult at best.

It's much like passenger diesel DPFs which are (1) non-separable from the cat so you can't remove and clean them -- heavy truck units, on the other hand, are SEPARATE (for this exactly reason) and (2) three to five times as expensive as they should be due to integration with the cat, which does NOT typically wear out yet MUST be replaced when the DPF wears out. That too is an intentional design decision which is why I will never own a modern-emissions diesel passenger vehicle.
 

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I would caution you against the in-line filter, I used a Magnifine one and found that it significantly restricted the fluid flow. I’m jealous of your mileage lol I’m at 161,650 but still no major mechanical issues :)
I know, the mileage is quite nice! :) Perfect time for catching a bunch of maintenance items before they become/cause bigger issues!

Thanks for the warning on the in-line filter. That does sound like something to be aware of. I'll be sure to do more research on that particular topic to see if there's something that will work or if it's simply best to avoid. Thanks!
 

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If you're going to do an external filter for the transmission make it a bypass filter -- this way you do not restrict flow AND you get superior (depth-based) filtration at the same time.
 

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Oh, the other consideration is that ideally you would plumb the aux. ATF cooler in a manner where you have 2 isolation valves and a cooler bypass valve, so that in cold weather the fluid does NOT go through the aux. cooler. Once a season you would, in this manner, eliminate the aux. ATF cooler, and then once per season you would switch it back in.

Note: you plumb the auxiliary cooler AFTER / Downstream of the in-radiator-tank ATF cooler.

Yes, this switching-in and out of the aux. cooler is a minor PITA -- but that would prevent the ATF from becoming too viscous...
 

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I always read articles like that and find them to be useless. Ofcourse there are some vehicles that will break down faster and require service but as long as one keeps and maintains their vehicle, it should need service.
 
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