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Discussion Starter #1
Simply as the title states....or does anyone have any experience with these in the past?

Turns out a few people have told me the Hii H405 ARE NOT all season rubbers....kinda was skeptical about the tread design, so the Ventus V4 ES H105's are my next best bet.

Let me know guys...as my search for the ultimate all season rubber continues............

ayo DJQUIK i'm calling you out...mr. retro man....i know you got these let me know how they are...
 

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i had the HRII's on my civic and i loved them. dont know if theyre all season tho. i would go with hankook again, good performance for the price
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks Target...i would love to get the HRii 405's but not sure i can run them in the winter....they're heads up against the proxes 4 right now...since the winter hasn't been that bad as of yet <knock on wood> i still got some time to think about this....

anyone care to leave some feedback on the V4 Es H105's???
 

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I just changed to Hankook Ventus V4ES UHP this weekend. For the price, it's pretty darn good. I'll let you know after using them little more..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm getting a brand new set of 4 this weekend. ;o)

EDIT: 1/20/07 - I just got them on about an hour ago. These tires are awesome. I mean they're pretty awesome considering they're all seasons. I got the 225/50....as soon as i stepped out they caught my eye right away. Sidewall looks HOT, and not to mention they fill out the stock mazda rim like i'm use to seeing it filled, right up to the lip, and hanging over a little bit. Another added bonus of going up a size while increasing the sidewall is that the fender gap seems to look much "normal". The gap is a little less compared to stock. My initial reaction other than the sexy looks from the size is the tread. It looks like the tread will throw water away lovely. Can't wait to try it in the rain. We got a little icy conditions around, so i'm expecting a little snow later on in the month, although the weather has been sort of weird recently.

Driving on the Hankooks are awesome as well. Not only do they look nice, they FEEL nice also. On the road they kinda smoth out bumps a bit, this might because i went up a size and the sidewall being increased, but thats just my opinion. The noise is little to none. I can actually talk to someone on the phone and not have to turn the volume up on my phone. Its great...

Well with 37.8 miles on the tire, i got a long way to go before i report on them again.

Thank you come again!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tires are great...tons of rubber, SMOOTH ride, and best of all they hug the curves great....they were a champ during the winter storm we had, was booking it down the highway at 50+mph without a problem...

so far the exit ramp that i was able to take with the stock guys at 60mph i haven't tried to push the car yet to see what i could max the turn out at yet.....but i do have one question before i get serious with the rubbers...

1) the MAX airpressure is listed as 50psi....so what should my normal like everyday driving be at? I currently am running them at 46psi....took that measurement about after an 1.5hours with the car just sitting there are a drive. So usually when i drive it ...since the heat is created it should bring that psi level up..so i'm not sure where the psi should be...? any ideas?
 

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Thanks for the update on these tires; reviews about them are scarce, so please keep them coming. This tire is a one-third-the-price option for Canadians, compared to RE960AS or Pilot Exalto AS tires, so if they perform well they are a great tire value.

Hankooktire.ca shows the 225/50-17W XL with a load rating of 98! The info on the door of my TSX, which is slightly heavier than our Mazda6 4-cyl auto, and which comes with the same 17" OEM 93V XL Michelin as the Mazda, recommends 32psi front/30psi rear. Elsewhere on this website (mazda6club.com) I found that XL tires are load rated to carry their maximum load at 41psi; the OEM tires have excess capacity which is why the lower pressure is stated. Accordingly, you'd expect you should reduce the cold tire pressure to, well, around 30, or 32, which makes sense considering the greater volume of air in this larger sized tire, and its higher 98 vs 93 load rating.

Unless stated otherwise, a tire is assumed to have a Standard or SL rating, which means it's maximun load rating is at 35psi. The 215/50-17 tire has a 91 load rating (which is enough for both my TSX and Mazda6), and is presumed to be SL rated according to convention. But because of it's lower rating, this tire would require more air (ie more air pressure): say, 36psi front/34 psi rear.
 

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Hankooktire.ca shows the 225/50-17W XL with a load rating of 98! The info on the door of my TSX, which is slightly heavier than our Mazda6 4-cyl auto, and which comes with the same 17" OEM 93V XL Michelin as the Mazda, recommends 32psi front/30psi rear. Elsewhere on this website (mazda6club.com) I found that XL tires are load rated to carry their maximum load at 41psi; the OEM tires have excess capacity which is why the lower pressure is stated. Accordingly, you'd expect you should reduce the cold tire pressure to, well, around 30, or 32, which makes sense considering the greater volume of air in this larger sized tire, and its higher 98 vs 93 load rating.

Unless stated otherwise, a tire is assumed to have a Standard or SL rating, which means it's maximun load rating is at 35psi. The 215/50-17 tire has a 91 load rating (which is enough for both my TSX and Mazda6), and is presumed to be SL rated according to convention. But because of it's lower rating, this tire would require more air (ie more air pressure): say, 36psi front/34 psi rear.[/b]
You got some parts right. :yesnod:

The load any tire may safely bear is a function of the tire's inflation pressure; the higher the pressure, the more load the tire can support. Here is an example of how load changes with pressure. In this chart, a load index 93 tire will bear 1,102 pounds when inflated to 26 psi, 1,146 pounds when inflated to 28 psi, 1,246 pounds when inflated to 30 psi, 1,345 pounds when inflated to 33 psi, and 1,433 pounds when inflated to 36 psi.

P-Metric tires are rated either standard load or extra load. A standard load tire carries no special designation in its size specification, while an extra load tire will have the designation XL. The load rating stated for a standard load tire is the load that the tire safely can bear with an inflation pressure of 35 psi. The load rating stated for an XL tire is the load that the tire can safely bear with an inflation pressure of 41 psi.

Put another way, when Mazda recommends a standard load tire with a load index of 93, but recommends an inflation pressure of 32 psi, it is effectively de-rating the tire by about 250 pounds of load-carrying capacity from its rated capacity at 35psi, and the de-rating is even greater for an XL tire tire with a load index of 93 when it is inflated to 32 psi instead of 41 psi.

The load-carrying gains from increasing pressure are not open-ended. There is a limit on how much any tire may be inflated; and each tire will state on its sidewall the maximum inflation pressure beyond which the tire is in danger of exploding. A tire with a load index rated for an inflation pressure of 35 psi or 41psi may be stated to have a maximum inflation of 44 or 51 psi, but the maximum inflation pressure does NOT indicate the tire's load capacity.

European metric tires have a similar, but slightly different, load index system; for instance European load indices are rated at 250 kPa, which translates to 36 psi instead of P-metric's 35 psi. European metric tires are rated either standard load or reinforced load. A standard load tire carries no special designation in its size specification, while a reinforced load tire will have the designation Reinforced or RF.

I think it is important to address your statement:
you'd expect you should reduce the cold tire pressure to, well, around 30, or 32, which makes sense[/b]
When you reduce the pressure in the tire, as you reduce the tire's load-carrying capacity, you increase the amount of flex the sidewall undergoes with each revolution of the tire. Increasing the flex increases internal friction, and internal friction, in turn, generates heat, and the heat build-up can cause the tire to explode. Therefore, the recommended inflation pressure stated on the door pillar always should be regarded as the minimum cold inflation pressure for that vehicle. It is fine (and sometimes desirable) to increase the tire pressure from the value on the sticker (within limits, and not beyond the tire's maximum inflation pressure), but it is never a good idea to bleed pressure from the tires below the sticker's recommended inflation pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys for all the input. I must say though in regards to tire pressure it is VERY important that you get it right. Not only for ride comfort or performance characterisitcs, but for safety as well. My buddy who picked up a bigger Ventus V4 Es than me at 235/40 for his Altima SE-R popped one because he saw the maximum psi was stated at 50...so being the idiot that he is jacked the psi to yup...50 exactly. Needless to say about 3 days later he poped one. So he'll have to go back to the shop and argue it out with them. I already told him there's no point because those guys will tell he over inflated the tire and he'll be out another 100 bux.

So with that said, i feel that not only for safety i need to get this right before i drive anymore.

The load rating stated for a standard load tire is the load that the tire safely can bear with an inflation pressure of 35 psi. The load rating stated for an XL tire is the load that the tire can safely bear with an inflation pressure of 41 psi.[/b]
Not trying to put you on the spot Post, but just wanted to say that with an XL tires not sure of the load rating your specifiying here is that they should be inflated to around 41psi? Which i think would be good for me. As of right now the reason why i picked up on the low inflated tires is that my GAS MILEAGE has gone to shyt. So instead of hitting the light at around 400 give or take 10 miles or so, i'm now lucky if i hit the light at 320ish...VERY LUCKY. So i thought to myself maybe its because ive been hitting the gas harder, but no...i made it a point to wait about 5k miles before i really started to test the tire, which i might add is great, BUT me stepping on the gas pedal has nothing to do with the horrible gas mileage, nor does the winter blend. So i took out the measure and sure enough tire pressure was around low 30 to mid 30's.

So being the genius that i am about knowing NOTHING about tires, my buddy calls me and said upong bumping the psi up in his tires it handles alot better. I remember hearing about those auto x guys bumping their pressure up to get an ultimate handling car, so i figured why not bump it up, but not enough to hit maximum. I ran the psi up to 46psi, and the car def. didnt understeer AS much, and i def. saw the needle for the gas gauge not drop as much either.

So i'm wondering that if running the car around low 40 to mid 40 psi should be good enough for me. I like a quick nimble ride, even though i know the 50 series tires aren't the best for this option, but i also like the smooth ride as well, thats why i chose this size, but as for tire pressure i'm not sure where i should be at. I went to get an oil change and tire rotation, and mazda put all 4 tires down to 35psi, and checked the yellow which is what 25-50% tread left...but thats another story lol.

I thank you post for the metric load table, it is great, looks like if i'm reading it right i would be fine at 30psi because the weight is 1433lbs, and figuring since i'm about 230+ trying to loose to weight not sure if that affects the psi as well as my little sub in the back? Sorry for all the confusion and if this post does not make sense i'm on a confrence call while trying to type my thoughts here.

Any other informative articles and such on the web Post, be sure to throw some my way. I'll continue the search on the web as well.
 

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So with that said, i feel that not only for safety i need to get this right before i drive anymore.
Not trying to put you on the spot Post, but just wanted to say that with an XL tires not sure of the load rating your specifiying here is that they should be inflated to around 41psi?

Any other informative articles and such on the web Post, be sure to throw some my way. I'll continue the search on the web as well.[/b]
It's your car, but 41 seems a bit high to me.

As long as you have a tire with load index as high as the OEM tires, then the starting point for inflation pressure should be the recommended number on the door pillar. In the case of the Mazda6, that is 32 psi. Some of us like to go a little higher; I run my tires at all four corners at 35 psi. Also, if you are running 91 load index tires on a 6s (OEM tires on the 6i are load index 91, but on the 6s the OEM tires are load index 93, with a recommended inflation of 32 psi), it is probably a good idea to inflate the 91 load index tires to 35 psi rather than the door sticker's 32 psi.

I think that the benefits of going above 35 psi usually are outweighed by other considerations: you will get uneven wear (more wear in the middle of the tread, less wear at the edges), a harsher ride, and the size of the contact patch will be smaller, possibly reducing braking efficiency. Of course, if you are running exceptionally heavy loads (your four passengers are sumo wrestlers, and they brought their lluggage with them), then you may need more load carrying capacity, and then the benefits of higher inflation pressures outweigh the down side described in the perceding sentence.

The best single site I know of for decoding tire information is Chris Longhurst's, here.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Quoted from Chris Longhurst's article provided by Post. GREAT INSITE!

What's the "correct" tyre pressure?
How long is a piece of string?
Seriously though, you'll be more likely to get a sensible answer to the length of a piece of string than you will to the question of tyres pressures. Lets just say a good starting point is the pressure indicated in the owner's manual, or the sticker inside the driver's side door pillar.I say 'starting point' because on every car I've owned, I've ended up deviating from those figures for one reason or another. On my Subaru Impreza, as outlined above, I got much better gas mileage and no difference in tyre wear by increasing my pressures to 40psi. On my Honda Element, I cured the vague handling and outer-tyre-edge wear by increasing the pressures from the manufacturer-recommended 32/34psi front and rear respectively, to 37psi all round. On my Audi Coupe I cured some squirrelly braking problems by increasing the pressure at the front from 32psi to 36psi. On my really old VW Golf, I cured bad fuel economy and vague steering by increasing the pressures all-round to 33psi.
So what can you, dear reader, learn from my anecdotes? Not much really. It's pub-science. Ask ten Subaru Impreza owners what they run their tyres at and you'll get ten different answers. It depends on how they drive, what size wheels they have, what type of tyres they have, the required comfort vs. handling levels and so on and so forth. That's why I said the sticker in the door pillar is a good starting point. It's really up to you to search the internet and ask around for information specific to your car.

The Max. Pressure -10% theory.
Every tyre has a maximum inflation pressure stamped on the side somewhere. This is the maximum pressure the tyre can safely achieve under load. It is not the pressure you should inflate them to.
Having said this, I've given up using the door pillar sticker as my starting point and instead use the max.pressure-10% theory. According to the wags on many internet forums you can get the best performance by inflating them to 10% less than their recommended maximum pressure (the tyres, not the wags - they already haves inflated egos). It's a vague rule of thumb, and given that every car is different in weight and handling, it's a bit of a sledgehammer approach. But from my experience it does seem to provide a better starting point for adjusting tyre pressures. So to go back to my Subaru Impreza example, the maximum pressure on my Yokohama tyres is 44psi. 10% of that is 4.4, so 44-4.4=39.6psi which is about where I ended up. On my Element, the maximum pressure is 40psi so the 10% rule started me out at 36psi. I added one more to see what happened and it got better. Going up to 38psi and it definitely went off the boil, so for my vehicle and my driving style, 37psi on the Element was the sweet spot.


so by this i'm assuming that running my tires at 45psi should be okay...but i think i'll drop it down a bit just because NJ roads aren't the smoothest, and with all the pot holes from those snow plows and such i'll run em around that 42ish psi mark and get back to you guys....thanks again
 
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