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So the wires were showing and I had to tap the wires to the battery to get it to connect. Someone at autOzone helped me and unscrewed the battery terminal and stripped the wire a little and then put the wire on the terminal and tightened it back up.
In this case do you think I need to replace battery cables? Works fine since he did that no more juggling wires not even once
 

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Hello, welcome to the group.
I suppose if you had a problem again you would know exactly where to go to fix it.

You could cut and attach a replacement connector. Usually the battery terminals and the ground connections need to be cleaned periodically on these older 1st gen models.

I believe the original battery wires are no longer available new and were over $100 when they were available.
 

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If you have corrosion on the wire's itself and it goes back into the wire insulation, then it is better to replace those wires. If not, you can just clean it, get new connectors and leave it alone for now if it works.

That would also be a good time to upgrade to a thicker gauge wire for both the grounds and positive wire. Maybe a 1/0 gauge stranded. it's also much economical to get universal kits and make your own custom cable vs buying expensive "pre-made" ones.

I would ditch the OEM battery terminal connectors too. Get some good quality ones.

Avoid auto parts stores for these kind of things if possible. Sub-par cables and connectors. Price marked up too.

You'll be amazed at how well your electrical system will work afterward.
 

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Dude, seriously, quit spitting falsehoods. What he had done is more than fine.
Wow, you again. I get that you find me cute, but you are starting to take this stalking thing a bit much. But I guess being a keyboard warrior can give you a false boost in ego sometimes.

Hey, by all means. If you want to get low quality generic products from the likes of AutoZone and Advanced Auto Parts for important fixes rather than spend your hard earned money to get quality product.. that’s all up to you. Don’t let me stop you. And I won’t.



I am just inputting my 2¢ from experiences.



(╭☞ ಠ ͜つ ಠ )╭☞ r=1+sinθ
 

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Also, once again. It appears that you have a problem not been fully reading articles/post before bashing your keyboard..

I’ll recap and paraphrase myself,

basically, I said, that if the cable had corrosion and if it’s bad enough then it would be a great idea to replace the main battery cables and terminal connectors to a better quality product than what OEM were. Which were crappy to start with.

If not, then just live with it for now b/c it works.

If possible, shop around and avoid getting thick, low quality cables from parts store like AutoZone and Advance Auto Parts. Not because that they will not work BUT because it is of low quality and is more expensive for that low of quality. Better sources elsewhere.

The car will run a lot better w/better quality main cables.

Hope that helps.



(╭☞ ಠ ͜つ ಠ )╭☞ r=1+sinθ
 

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The car will run a lot better w/better quality main cables.
Now I’m confused. I can see that it will start better, but I’ve always thought once the car was started, it would run fine off just the alternator. I’m new to Mazda, so maybe they’re different than the other cars I’ve owned.
 

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It is all about Ohm's Law. Efficiency of electrical flow will affect performance of systems.

The less resistance your system have the better it will perform b/c you are not wasting that finite electrical power to friction.

Quality conductors of sizable gauge will allow your charging system to work less to provide a stable power source to feed all the electrical needs of the vehicle. ie; Spark, Sensors, ECU, PCM, modules, et al.

While, Yes, The alternator becomes the primary electrical source after the engine has been started.. the battery is still within the system. If the alternator/generator have to fight to keep the battery charged to a set limit dictated by ECU then it will cause a strain and eventually make the vehicle's electrical system less stable. Overworking the alternator and voltage regulator.

basically, better cables will allow the alternator to charge your battery more efficiently with the voltage regulator not being overworked, thus providing a more stable electrical power to rest of the car. Lessen the chances of faults. Many computer modules and ECU work in the very sensitive 5-volt and milliamp range.
 

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So the wires were showing and I had to tap the wires to the battery to get it to connect. Someone at autOzone helped me and unscrewed the battery terminal and stripped the wire a little and then put the wire on the terminal and tightened it back up.
In this case do you think I need to replace battery cables? Works fine since he did that no more juggling wires not even once
The battery problem sounds like a bad translation from a foreign language.
The corrosion that matters in this case was simple and the AutoZone guy should know it. Get the car going if possible so the non-mechanic customer can get home safely and get help there, also if possible. The issues was between the battery post and the cable connector, get that taken care of and happy customer. AutoZone should have the tool to clean battery posts and the battery cable terminals. But with out it, a small blade pocket knife can be used to scrape out the corrosion from inside the cable connector where it surrounds the battery post, done it many times through the years. For the battery post--a narrow strip of medium sandpaper will clean up the battery post nicely. The problem is non mechanic people never look under the hood until the car won't start, a bad policy! Get familiar under there, you don't need to be an expert or even a mechanic, get to know the basics. I have worked on cars for 60 years and airplanes for 40. I don't know where the sensors are for my 07 Speed6 with out looking them up.
The cause of battery terminal corrosion in this case may have been caused by acid vapors or even acid leaking past the battery post or posts and battery case because of it's bad design, heat and vibration brings acid from inside the battery to the top of the battery, then the acid goes to town eating up your battery cable terminal and cable leaving the terminal. If ignored long enough as seems in this case real trouble happens. If the area around the battery terminal is damp, that's battery acid and you have a serious problem. As time passes and issue ignored the corrosion works it's way down the cable slowly eating it as seems to have happened here. Corrosion expands the cable insulation, it breaks off exposing more and more cable.
Cable quality was brought up. My personal jumper cables are rated at 400 clamp amps, cheap ones are lucky to be rated at half that rating. A quality jumper set, or replacement battery cables for your car, the cables should be made up of fine wire to make up the gauge size, vs cheap cables that use larger wire strands with fewer of them in the cable for it's gauge or size.
People may think electricity or electron flow is inside the wire so the wire composition don't matter but it does matter because electron flow is on the outside of wire, lots of fine wire strands, more electron flow for the same size or gauge wire/cable as cheap wire/cable. Impure reclaimed copper in the cord will have higher resistance and can be part of the problem too.
Now info most people could care less about but here it is if interested. Batteries are very expensive these days, $100 or more is all to common. For a battery that is still performing but beyond warranty, fix your battery. Clean top of battery with a solution of baking soda and water, the ratio can easy be looked up. Have running water handy to flush the inner fender panel if acid gunk gets on it or in battery box. I like to take my battery out to look under it for corrosion/rust damage. New cars use plastic battery box or a shelf but there is steel under there. If car is older, the area may need a repair.
Dry off the battery top with paper towels, then seal with a small bead of silicone at the battery post and case mating point with silicone RTV sealant, Walmart automotive sells different types. Before sealing, run some masking tape around the terminals leaving some space near the case for a bead of silicone. You do not want silicone between the battery post and car battery cable terminal!
If you see brown spots on the pavement under your where the battery is, or the drain hole in your belly pan, your battery needs to be replaced. The alternator is trying to top off the battery but it's plates have sulfated to the point it won't top off anymore so acid gets boiled out of vent holes and on to the ground. Also eating up your cables and terminals. Battery acid will leave brown rust looking stains on your concrete if not washed away quickly.
Now that that is done, if the cables are savable. Work the baking soda solution into the exposed terminal wire strands, neutralizing the acid inside, perhaps wire brush the strands to clean as much as possible. When good and dry, apply a coat of black RTV covering the wire strands. Black silicone simply to match the cable color. When dry, for aesthetics install some black spiral wrap wire protection over the silicone.
 
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