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Discussion Starter · #41 · (Edited)
Pictures, Images, References etc

ELECTRICAL:
06 HID Main Fuse Panel:





EDIT:
Adding Owners Manual Stuff:

Under Hood:


Kick Panel, Drivers side US: Note Fuel pump relay is inside here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Emissions routing, EGR, Purge, Vent, PVC,

Routing and component names....



TAGS: PCV positive crankcase ventilation, oil consumption, neglect, blame, didn't check the oil, neglect! HO2S, EGR BOOST SENSOR, EGR BOOST SENSOR SOLENOID VALVE, EGR VALVE, TP SENSOR, MAF IAT SENSOR, ECT SENSOR, CKP SENSOR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 · (Edited)
Wheel Bearing Replacement Front & Rear PNs & Torque Specs

FROM: Wheel Bearing Replacement Front & Rear PNs & Torque Specs

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The 6 will NOT make 100,000 on the OEM wheel bearings. Left front is pretty loud when turning RIGHT at speed (shifts weight to left front). All corners are very loud so its time replacement! I'm ordering the bearings to get the front done and hopefully the road noise in the cabin will drop back down. Its just been getting louder and louder and the car's just under 96,000 miles.

FWIW: I wrote both Timken and NTN about a tapered roller bearing as a replacement. There is no drop in replacement/upgrade so ball bearings are going back in. Honestly I'm a little disappointed as my Camry of 265,000 miles is running on the STOCK OEM WHEEL BEARINGS! That car is not light either.

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OMG!!! MAZDA QUOTE!!!! $400 and axle for labor at $103/hr plus $200 just for the front bearings and $180 for the rear w/hubs

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DISCLAIMER: I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ERRORS OR OMISSIONS.....
Use this information at YOUR OWN RISK!
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TORQUE SPEC, FRONT SUSPENSION:
Wheel bearing radial play: 0.05 mm, 0.002" (using dial indicator on hub)
Front Axle Nut: 173 - 202 ft/lbs
Peen nut into axle: 0.02"
Lower ball joints to Spindle: 123 - 148
Upper ball joint: 29 - 39
Tie rode nut to spindle: 29 - 39
Caliper bolts to spindle: 57 - 75
Dust Shield to Spindle: 12 - 17
Wheel Speed Sensor: 14 - 19
Wheel speed wire holder: 14 - 19
WHEEL LUG NUTS: 65 - 87 Ft/Lbs
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Additional Component Tq Specs
Anti-Sway Bar End Link Nuts: 32 - 39
Pinch Bolt at Shock Bottom: 32 - 39
Shock to Lower Control Arm: 69 - 93
Shock Top to Body (3X): 22 - 29
Shock Shaft to Top Bearing (1X Nut): 29 - 39
Top A-Arm Inner Pivot to Body: 36 - 49
Lower Arm Inner Pivot to Subframe: 69 - 93
Lower Arm REAR Pivot to Subframe: 69 - 93​
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TORQUE SPEC, REAR SUSPENSION:
Wheel bearing radial play: 0.05 mm, 0.002" (using dial indicator on hub)
Rear Axle Nut: 130 - 173
Caliper to Spindle: 38 - 49
Spindle to rear Bracket: 87 - 115
Dust Shield to Spindle: 12 - 17

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OEM PART NUMBERS: Front Wheel Bearing Mazda 6;
GP7A33047 ; GK2A-33-047; GK2A-33-047A; GK2A33047; GK2A33047A

AFTERMARKET PART NUMBERS:
BECK/ARNLEY Part # 0513944, SKF Part # FW166, NATIONAL Part # 510010, TIMKEN Part # 510053
Inner Diameter 1.6535" (inner race needed press 1.65" to 2.26")
Outer Diameter 3.1496" (outer race size needed for press (3.148" to 2.87")
Width 1.7717"
Bearing Style Dual BALL G1​


REAR W/HUB: Note most are Gen 2 or 3 style - i.e. outer hub is the race. Its not cassette style bearing pushed into the hub.
BECK/ARNLEY Part # 0516229, {#2121311, GK2H2615XA}, SKF Part # BR930411, PRO Part # 29512271, MOOG/NATIONAL Part # 512271, TIMKEN Part # HA590100, RAYBESTOS Part # 712271

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Here is a link showing the basic work involved. I've added a few comments.

This guy did a pretty fair job for never having done it before. ;) ^^ link ^^

1) Pickle forks destroys boots. Don't rent them, don't use them unless you intend to replace the ball joints/control arm/tie-rods etc.

2) A big hammer goes a long ways if you can hit what your aiming at. Those joints are all tapered studs into a cast steel. Hitting the exterior of the casting on its edge will distort the housing for a fraction of second and let the stud(s) drop out. Very quick, very easy, very effective. You must deliver a quick accurate blow at high speed using a hammer with a enough mass to get the job done. A sledge is often too heavy and household claw hammer will not do ANYTHING. Don't waste your time. So something between 30 and 40 oz is best. Strike the area having the most exposed curve. Do three swings to practice alignment and MAKE CERTAIN YOUR FINGERS WILL NOT BE SMASHED! Then 2 for the money or until the joint pops.

If you can't swing a hammer accurately, rent a puller. Nothing personal, it takes practice....

Do NOT leave anything loose. And when tightening up tapered studs, DO NOT loosen the nuts to get the pins in. Turn it ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Flush Power Steering Fluid

Every couple years I like to flush the power steering as there is nothing to remove debris except a mesh catch trap. And this being Mazda's quality M-V spec fluid it burns and looks black pretty quick for power steering fluid.
Here is an option to flush it out.

It calls for the Mazda M-V. I personally would not put that in there it burns way faster than DexIII which will meet the needs of the pump and Racks requirements.

But, from the Owners Manual the fluid is:
ATF M-III, M-V, or equivalent (e.g. Dexron® III).

Prerequisite; you need a helper to run the ignition switch!
In short, here is how it goes. Grab the return from the R&P and get that pointed towards a drain pan. I decoupled the hose at the joint and slipped some clear hardware store vinyl hose over it and start the car. While adding lots of fluid to the reservoir, steer it left and right. It drinks it FAST, hence the need for an operator at the key. Don't let it run out. Turn the engine off if you get behind adding fluid.

Lift the car and support it so the wheels can be turned. USE JACKSTANDS AND BLOCK THE REAR WHEEL AS WELL AS SET THE BRAKE!

1) Remove reservoir and clean it. Backflush the drain (outlet) from the reservoir to remove any contaminants.
2) Install reservoir and connect the line sets to it.
3) See picture: Open line-set at red/green connection. Plug the Red end so the fluid stays in the reservoir. Direct the Green into pan using a hose.

4) With OPENED bottles of fluid ready, fill reservoir to top and start engine. Begin steering lock to lock slowly. Under pressure this will force most of the debris out of the R&P and dump it into the pan through the return hose.
5) Warning - if you can't keep up FILLING FLUID, turn engine off before reservoir is sucked dry.
6) After 2 - 3 qts have been dumped through, turn the engine off. Restore connections, and fill reservoir.
7) Start engine and slowly turn wheel L&R. Do not aerate the pump by quick steering inputs. Do not let it go empty. If it starts foaming at the reservoir, turn the engine off and let it sit until foam returns to liquid. Add fluid if low and start engine. Repeat until no bubbles are present, reservoir is full and pump is not whining from trapped air.
8) Done. Lower car and test drive after checking for leaks.
9) Check level after test drive.


If you ever need to replace a pump or a Rack and Pinion steering gear, do THIS BEFORE the PART IS REPLACED so the new part doesn't get contaminated with debris and reduce its life span.
 

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Subd'
Thankyou sir for more awesome info! This is the type of stuff that EVERYONE should know...or at least take the time to find...
:bowdown:
 

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Great info on the PS fluid. I'll do this next time. All I did before was suck it out with a turkey baster, refill, run for a bit with multiple turns, suck it out, refill, run, until it looked new. That was my procedure until I did my (multiple) engine swap (yes, I replace my engine twice) and realized that disconnecting the PS hose was much easier.
 

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The first replacement engine was from a 2005 6 with 130,000 miles. It must've been a bad engine because it started making shearing noises within 1000 miles. Then rod knock soon followed. Luckily the auto wrecker that I got it from upheld their warranty and found me a 2006 Fusion engine with 16,000 miles.
 
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