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Discussion Starter #21
Random misfire detected (P0300)
• The PCM monitors the CKP sensor input signal interval time. The PCM calculates the change of the interval time for each cylinder. If the change of interval time exceeds the preprogrammed criteria, the PCM detects a misfire in the corresponding cylinder. While the engine is running, the PCM counts the number of misfires that occurred at 200 crankshaft revolutions and 1,000 crankshaft revolutions and calculates the misfire ratio for each crankshaft revolution. If the ratio exceeds the preprogrammed criteria, the PCM determines that a misfire, which can damage the catalytic converter or affect emission performance, has occurred.
Specific cylinder misfire detected (P0301, P0302, P0303, P0304, P0305, P0306)

• The PCM monitors the crankshaft position sensor input signal interval time. The PCM calculates the change of the interval time for each cylinder. If the change of interval time exceeds the preprogrammed criteria, the PCM detects a misfire in the corresponding cylinder. While the engine is running, the PCM counts the number of misfires that occurred at 200 crankshaft revolutions and 1,000 crankshaft revolutions and calculates the misfire ratio for each crankshaft revolution. If the ratio exceeds the preprogrammed criteria, the PCM determines that a misfire, which can damage the catalytic converter or affect emission performance, has occurred.

===== EDIT
BOTTOM LINE: don't WAIT until the MIL light is flashing! Its too LATE. Hint: a CEL for P030X is not 100 percent. You likely have other bad coil packs!!! Just because it didn't trigger a cell doesn't mean its not misfiring under load!

The TEST:
Turn off every accessory, every light, every load, AC etc. Drive it. How does it run, does it hesitate, misfire, is it better? << Drive in daylight with lights off.
Turn on EVERY LOAD, AC, Seat heater, Defrost, turn them all ON! Does it make it misfire and hesitate off idle, and taking off? Did it MAKE IT WORSE??? If so, you likely have another bad COP.

Unlike other manufactures who look at each coils ring back signature to determine if the spark was delivered to the plug, Ford and Mazda rely on crankshaft velocity. So the ECM is basically watching the Crank sensor to see if the CrankShaft meets its expectation for rotational speed for the situation. If it does, there is NO MISFIRE TO REPORT. If it detects a misfire and reports a P030X, its because the ECM counted 200 continuous misfires from the SAME Cylinder. The car is pretty much running like shit at this point and can't be neglected. Should it get a dozen clean rotations, it WOULD NOT have reported it as a MISFIRE. So these problems can exist and do DAMAGE for a long TIME depending on the situation. << Make sense?

Point: do some testing. If your car stumbles, Hesitates, bucks, stutters, cuts out, or simply won't move like it used too, its good chance you should be looking at or looking for MORE BAD COPs as waiting for the ECM to report them and it will be TOO LATE!
I haven't posted in a while but thought I would share this. I've been reading on aviation forums and guess what - when plugs go bad on those they are faced with the same issue. Who caused what.
Guess what, their engines start to smoke from a misdiagnosed misfires akso. PISTON ENGINES NEED to FIRE AND BURN THE AF CHARGE to BUILD COMPRESSION AND KEEP THE PISTON RINGS SEATED!!!
A compression stroke is NOT ENOUGH!!! Like I've been saying I think some people are giving up hope too soon with their smoking engines. Get the cylinder(s) firing, let it rev, change the oil often and unless there is physical damage to a cylinder, rings CAN SEAT AGAIN! Try it! Don't let an engine run out of oil because its a smoker. Put NEW plugs COPs in ASAP if you suspect its misfiring as they can be brought back to life. This may take a couple 1000 miles. BUT YOU MUST HAVE FIXED THE PROBLEM! It must NOT be hesitating!

DO NOT wait for the ECM to tell you its misfiring (too late). Sadly many know something is wrong and neglect it!!! Don't! You know it is when it stumbles, hesitates, and stutters upon take off.
 

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Thanks for the help last time. Long story short, my mechanic just cleaned out the throttle body and the problem went away.

Now, I'm getting some oil burning in my exhaust. It's not consistent. Some start ups, and every once in a while during driving, but mostly doesn't do it at all. I saw that there was a thread about the PCV valve, but you refuted it.

I also have noticed this in the past. Usually it happens at start up for me when an oil change is due (I do 5k or less for my intervals now). When I get new oil, the problem goes away. So, I'm thinking it's a viscosity/sealing issue.

One time my gf drove the car and it was smoking a lot and she heard a ticking sound and loss of throttle for a bit. Took it to my mechanic, but the problem didn't duplicate.

So, if it's wear/seals, what seals am I looking at and how much is this going to destroy my wallet?
 

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possibly one of the single most useful threads on this forum. I found answers here for several of the things i've been trying to diagnose for ages, as well as the information i needed to go about it.
+100500
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Thanks for the help last time. Long story short, my mechanic just cleaned out the throttle body and the problem went away.

Now, I'm getting some oil burning in my exhaust. It's not consistent. Some start ups, and every once in a while during driving, but mostly doesn't do it at all. I saw that there was a thread about the PCV valve, but you refuted it.

I also have noticed this in the past. Usually it happens at start up for me when an oil change is due (I do 5k or less for my intervals now). When I get new oil, the problem goes away. So, I'm thinking it's a viscosity/sealing issue.

One time my gf drove the car and it was smoking a lot and she heard a ticking sound and loss of throttle for a bit. Took it to my mechanic, but the problem didn't duplicate.

So, if it's wear/seals, what seals am I looking at and how much is this going to destroy my wallet?
Again, I haven't been around much but you might running a couple of cans of Techron from Chevron through it to keep the injectors clean.
I'm finding that every 4 months or so mine likes the throttle pedal reset as it helps idle when A/C is on and reduce the lag. I can't call it calibration, but it picks up about a 1/4 second of lag over time and when I do the reset, it fixes it for a while.

This time I was going to log some data from the engine on TPS vs Accelerator pedal position doing a before and after but I just haven't got around to it. it may help yours should the stall thing come back as disconnecting it, may have actually been the fix vs the cleaning. Although if yours is moving lots of oil it may have been dirty.

Throttle Rest:
- With Key in the ON position, engine off, all accessories off, car in park(N).
- Press gas pedal down slowly, evenly, and constant rate until it touches floor.
- Once down; - Release gas pedal slowly, evenly, and constant rate until its completely up.
- Turn the key off.

* Drive like normal and see if the passing gear lag is gone.

&&&&&&&&
As for the oil use. It sounds like you might want to reduce the OCI to 4000 miles. The reason being the fresh oil has more detergents to break down varnish. Leaving it longer seems to be attributing to the smoke. So give it a shot.

Having someone replace the valve stem seals (if compression test is good and even across all cylinder) may be a good step. The problem is the labor.
All of the timing components have to come off the front as well as the cams, and then without pulling the heads, remove the valve springs. All to replace $50 worth of seals. Unless its been A) over-heated. B) is a sludge motor, I'd think the valve stem seals would be fine. If you can reach in push on them and see if they are still pliable, thats a good sign. If hard as rock or broken, that would imply replacement and explain oil consumption. << You can verify this by pulling the intake and looking at the back sides of the valves. If they are caked with deposits, the valve stem seals are shot (not applicable to boosted vehicles with leaking turbo seals). Mine looked spotless when I did the plugs at 80,000. Its got 92,000 on it now...
 

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Discussion Starter #25
V6 Auto owners, Do this NOW! Lag, Hesitation, Abrupt shifts (FIXED)

Does your 6 suffer from:
  • Passing gear lag, takes it sweet time to drop a gear and accelerate
  • Abrupt downshift (skipping gears like 3->1, 4->2, 6->3)
  • Jerking off idle while rolling on and off the throttle i.e. traffic jams
  • Abrupt engagement under light throttle
  • Non-linear control of engine speed for minor throttle changes
I've owned my 6 for just about a year now and have a VERY SIMPLE CURE for these conditions. Reset the Throttle Curve! Original is here: http://forum.mazda6club.com/3-0l-v6/269337-v6-auto-owners-do-now-lag-hesitation-abrupt-shifts-fixed.html

HOW TO RESET THROTTLE CURVE:
  • Drive car to warm engine and drive train
  • Stop car and leave transmission in Park (Manual trans, leave it in gear).
  • Turn Ignition Switch OFF
  • Let off throttle pedal completely
  • Turn Ignition Switch on to Run position BUT DO NOT START!!
  • Slowly, consistently and at the even rate, depress the throttle pedal completely to the floor. BE SMOOTH!!!
  • Once down completely, Slowly, consistently and at the same rate, RELEASE the throttle pedal completely from the floor.
  • Once at the top, remove your foot and turn the Ignition Key OFF!
  • Done!
  • - Repeat every 90 days or when you notice it not playing nice!!

As you all know the servo sounding noise under the hood when the key is turned off is the Throttle Body Calibrating itself for idle and partial throttle load. Over time, most of us NEVER use full throttle as much as we use idle and partial throttle. This is my theory but it seems as if the ECM looses track of the linear curve from idle to WOT and makes decisions based upon a non-linear curve. This simple process has corrected my car making it so much more pleasant to drive. Doing this every 3 months is now a MUST!!

I've done this to several TBW vehicles, Toyota, Nissan, Ford, and Mazda 3. It seems to help all of them. Give it a try and report back.


Results may vary but it works well on this combination: 2006, AJ 3.0 & AW6A-EL 6 Spd
THIS DOES NOT FIX; stumble, misfire, CEL Faults, poor tune.

TAG: Throttle By Wire, LAG, Abrupt engagement, being a Jerk!
 

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I wish my breaks look as sparkling-shiny as these one at the picture!
Most important, do it every 2 years to remove moisture and sediment which wears down the brake system components. This will extend the life of these items. Although it looks like a Closed system it is vented to the atmosphere and the fluid attracts and holds moisture. So as your pads wear, the moisture in the reservoir is pulled into the master cylinder. Once inside the moisture cause the brake lines to rust and oxidation of the cast steel and aluminum parts. This process make tiny molecules which IS NOT inducesive to a firm brake pedal! Also, if yours 6 is an MTX, bleed the clutch slave cylinder too!
- did not want to quote the whole post, just wanted to say "thank you" for the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter #28

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Discussion Starter #29
Pre-CAT failures; Why!

Various threads ask why this happens; here are some thoughts.

I'm thinking the Pre-CATs crack faster than other downstream CATs due to demand. That is, the FEDs wanted them functional the moment the car starts as thats when the engine needs to run rich so its stable and that's when it makes the most pollutants. How do we get that; lets move the CAT next to the exhaust valve where the burn temperature is 1200F already! These hot gases will essentially bring the CAT on line sooner so it can be effective at converting unburned fuel. We'll call it the Pre-CAT.
I'm thinking that's short for Pre-Catastrophic failure!​

From this; the instant thermal change from being say ambient at 50F to being fully functional at 950F exposes flaws which then crack the core. Think in terms of placing lots pressure on a glass, heating it and now shock it with pressure waves. Any uneven pressure from the metal casing can induce stress fractures. Once a fracture occurs, The exhaust pulses agitate the core creating free particles. That glass like core once broken is making small particles from rubbing on itself. Those are ingested by the engine.

Overly rich mixtures bring the cores temp to melting as CAT's try to convert the raw fuel by burning it. This can crack the core. Engine oil if being consumed creates different temperatures across the core. Do to its crystal like structure, this also leads to it breaking the core as one area is working on burning the oil while another is burning gas. This creates dramtticlay different temperatures across the honey comb core. So, as particles shift back an forth with heating/cooling thermal expansion we also have the pulses from the firing cylinders agitating the broken core against itself; add too that, it being inches from the exhaust valve it is easily sucked back into the exhaust due to its near point blank range.

Yes, I suppose some of the silica particles are fed through the engine via the EGR in small doses, but most is likely feed backwards up the exhaust manifold header during engine deceleration when intake vacuum is high. When the throttle is shut the engine is acting as a big vacuum pump and it is NOT flowing out the exhaust valve with 100% flow down the manifold pipe.

How to prevent it; proper construction materials, design, and moving it away from the exhaust port. Feds won't be happy about that last one.

That's my theroy. PS I have Toyota with no Pre-cat and 270,000 miles. Cat is original OEM.

FWIW: Mazda is NOT the only manufacture who suffers. All of the others are too.
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
6s (V6) PCV Valve Failure, Excessive Oil Consumption

6s (V6) PCV Valve Failure, Excessive Oil Consumption

This thread has allot of Good information in it (http://forum.mazda6club.com/3-0l-v6/158303-6s-v6-pcv-valve-failure-excessive-oil-consumpti.html) but it also has some incorrect and misleading information in it. With over 300 posts, you'll never finish reading it. I encourage you to take a moment read some highlights from this same thread regarding what is and what is NOT happening in relation to an engines oil consumption and the PCV valve.

PASTE:

http://forum.mazda6club.com/3-0l-v6/158303-6s-v6-pcv-valve-failure-excessive-oil-consumpti-11.html#post3488634 Post #307
How does the PCV effect oil consumption on the AJ V6 3.0? Like any other engine the Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) valve is NOT the cause of oil consumption!
The diagram below shows the path for the inlet air through the air filter into the Bank2 valve cover via the red hose (bank2 is near the grill). The air is pulled through the engines crankcase from bank2 valve cover (VC) to the Bank1 VC gathering oil fumes (ORANGE). When the throttle plates are closed, the engines vacuum is high and part of the engines idle air is supplied by the PCV through Bank1 VC which is the GREEN hose into the IM.

Again - for all those who wish to blame the PCV valve for oil consumption, NOT ITS FAULT! The engines oil pump feeds oil to the reciprocating components to lubricate and cool them. A by product of this is oil vapor which must be extracted from the crankcase. Hence the need for the PCV system; to remove oil vapor and reduce internal pressure which can cause seals and gaskets to leak. To Reduce emissions those fumes are pulled into the intake track and harmlessly burned during the combustion process. This is pretty standard across all makes and models of 4 stroke combustion engines.

Worn out engines with higher amounts of blow-by past the piston rings can raise the pressure in the CC increasing the demand on the PCV. A by-product of this is oil consumption. i.e. normally the oil condenses back into a solid and returns to the sump as "oil" to be used it again and again. However, when in excess, the vapors have no where to go and are literally pumped out of the engine as vapor. The PCV is not responsible for rate of consumption, it is a path for oil to be burned by engines with a high amount of blow-by past the pistons compression rings. It is now the RESPONSIBILITY OF THE OWNER TO CHECK AND MAINTAIN THE OIL LEVEL! Just because the oil is rated for 5, 6, and 7,000 mile intervals doesn't mean you can neglect or that a once good engine didn't burn oil of the course of time.

I added arrows to show Idle vs WOT throttle. During WOT there is so much oil vapor from oil being slung everywhere - that typically both valve covers are venting fumes into BOTH intake tracks.



If you understand how critical the idle control air is to an engines performance you can see why PCV valves metering orifice is important to idle speed and how sludge build up internal to the PCV valves orifice can change the idle speed making the ECM have to perform corrections to the idle control air at the TB. Hint - not ALL PCVs ar the same as they meter idle speed air and have different orifices sizes for different applications. In short - When the throttle is closed at the TB, the engine is running and idling burning its own fumes from the crankcase. The check valve inside the PCV is to stop back-fires in the intake track from entering the Crankcase and causing a hazardous explosion.

Bottom line: check and change you oil! If it's low after 3000 miles, how low will it be in 7000 miles??





http://forum.mazda6club.com/3-0l-v6/158303-6s-v6-pcv-valve-failure-excessive-oil-consumpti-10.html#post3456895 Post #300 from 09-25-2012

NOT on the band wagon about the PCV valve and hose causing EXCESSIVE OIL CONSUMPTION!!!! It doesn't add up. Its just a half baked idea ran wild!

The valve covers of engines are vented so the oil fumes from the reciprocating components and piston ring blow-by can be vented out of the crankcase so the engine doesn't build pressure internally. Internal pressure from plugged and/or inoperative vents force the oil out through the seals, gaskets, dipstick tube, oil pans seams, etc. If an engine can't breath it will leak oil as the gaskets and seal can only take so much before they begin to seep.

Being a V6 with two valve covers one vent is permanently routed directly to the intake before the TB (fresh air). The other is the topic of discussion and has manifold vacuum to extract the fumes from the crankcase and valve covers.

ON A GOOD ENGINE WITH PROPERLY FUNCTIONING PISTON RINGS and valve seals, one valve cover has fresh filtered air via the air cleaner. Engine vacuum from the IM pulls air through that cover and into the engine block and up into the cover connected to the IM so the fumes can be burned in the combustion process. The only thing the PCV valve does is control the volume because its a metered orifice and act as a stopper when / IF the IM track has combustion (don't want a fire in the crankcase).
PCV = Positive Crankcase Ventilation. POSITIVE meaning we want positive flow so the engine doesn't build pressure inside!

Big TIP when looking at USED CARS; look inside the intake runner for puddled oil! If it has puddled oil, it suggests above average blow by and "**maybe**" the RINGS are worn thus having blow by OR the PCV has been plugged for a long time. The engine is a big pump sucking air into the IM. This keeps the engine crankcase at or near a vacuum state NOT a PRESSURE STATE until reaching high RPMs. If the crankcase has Pressure at idle it means there is MORE blow by from the rings than the PCV can suck in!

A great test is to place some strong cellophane over the oil fill hole and seal it down. If it sucks in while the engine is at idle the PCV is forming a vacuum which is what we want. If it bubbles UP, the engine is building pressure which is not good sign but could be simple fix like the collapsed hose in this thread or the BAD NEWS, an engine rebuild!!! ** DO NOT START THE ENGINE AND REMOVE THE CAP OR OIL WILL FLY OUT EVERYWHERE! ** You need two people!

Is this making sense?


So I ask, how can defective PCV cause you engine fumes to disappear at a rate that does damage? It can't! The problem is NO ONE IS CHECKING THE OIL!!!! The fumes are CONSTANT! Always there! If you don't believe a word I said, wiki PCV Crankcase ventilation system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

EDIT: 2014-02
Lets looks at two populations of cars and explain WHY SOME USE OIL and others don't.

CASE A:
Good compression, engine is carbon free, it gets regular oil changes.
In CASE A; combustion blow by past the piston rings is very LOW. As such, the crankcase and heads are not building pressure with escaping combustion gases through the PCV system. THE COMBUSTION GASES ARE EXCITING THE EXHAUST LIKE THEY SHOULD! << Very important distinction!


CASE B:
The engine has lost compression on some cylinders, it runs fine, but has carbon build up on the pistons, rings, and cylinder head.
Combustion gases are now blowing past the piston rings into the crankcase!!! THESE GASES SHOULD BE GOING OUT THE EXHAUST, NOT INTO THE CRANKCASE!!!! This IS NOT the END all of stories until we see that the VALVE COVER IS A BADDDDDDDD DESIGN!!! The TWO COMBINED ARE AN ISSUE!

The increased VOLUME of oil vapor and gases in the crankcase must leave the engine. They do so through the valve covers and this is normal!
  • Where we get into trouble is likely the valve cover design itself. Its more like a funnel. Once the OIL VAPOR is in motion it simply follows the path right out of the engine into the intake NEVER SEPARATING THE VAPOR into a SOLID to return into circulation with the rest of the oil!!!
  • Think of a garden hose nozzle on MIST setting. Place a sock over the garden hose. What happens? The mist or vapor is condenses back into a solid and runs out of the pores in the sock. In the ideal world this is what the valve cover should do also. Extract the vapor and return it to a solid.
  • LOOK AT THE DESIGN HERE! ZERO BAFFLES, No REAL EXIT FOR THE FUMES. Once the fumes enter the hole at the end, they are whisked away as they have no place to condense or drop out of suspension. THIS IS THE WORST DESIGN I'VE EVER SEEN.
  • HINT: Most valve covers have louvers to allow the condensed fumes to drip back into the head. All we have here is a few small holes!!







The reason I bring this up is many have oil loss through the PCV and this is the gating factor; the ability of this baffle to separate the fumes from the solids and allow the solids back into circulation. When you have this many valve train components i.e. 12 lifters, 12 roller rockers, 12 sets of valves, that's a good bit of vapor to return to the pan. Now add in some combustion gases from the crankcase trying to exit the block and oil is simply swept away and bunred!
Anyway, I'm shocked how little baffling there is to allow the solids out back into the head.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
WARNING to CAN BUS SCANNERS! Scanner shutdown link & applied brakes (U1900 ABS)!!

FROM: http://forum.mazda6club.com/electrical/273593-warning-can-bus-scanners-scanner-shutdown-link-applied-brakes-u1900-abs.html#post3650081 << Please post comments about this issue in the link provided.

(( PASTE for Reference ))

Condensed story; 06s approaching 90,000 miles. 2013-09-23 morning commute had the car idling for 1.5 hours. It was fine when I parked it. I had no observations.

Drive home 9 hrs later. I notice it being kinda grab @ss with the throttle and the idle is down about 100 RPMs but not missing. Just low, thus making the "take off" feel kinda strange. So i plug in the OBDII blue tooth reader and get the Android Torque app spun up. No codes, no DTC's, so I start watching the O2 sensors on bank 1 & 2. Kinda ratty at times but NBD.

I make 3 different stops just walking away from the car after shutting it off but leaving the app running. On the last round I'm just about home and wanted to read the values from the PIDs. The APP reports lost communication with the ECU and BAAAAAAAAM the rear brakes are applied almost skidding on the wet road. MIL CEL and ATX come on and I feel the anti-lock pulsing the pedal. I turned the car off and the brakes let off. Turn key on and ATX mil is lit, car is in 3rd gear CEL is on but not flashing ATX MIL is on. I pull over and get off the main road turn the car off. I pulled the OBD dongle and started it. CEL is on, ATX MIL is off. OK - I plug in dongle and get a read - U0100 network, U1900 Network/ABS.
Figuring my probing caused this I disconnected and drove for 5 miles. All is well. Connect and scan one more time. Only the U0100 code remains. So I cleared it. Car drove fine today.

I found this on several different sites. Take away - That could have ended badly, use caution when polling the ECU/ECM for codes. I did it while driving and created some one off anomaly triggering the ABS unit! BE CAREFUL!!!

((PASTE))
Service bulletin:
Originally Posted by Mazda USA, CA
Bulletin No: 01-002/05 Last Issued: 01/13/2005

APPLICABLE MODEL(S)/VINS
All 2003 - 2004 Mazda 6
2005 Mazda 6 2.3L only


SUBJECT: FALSE MIL ILLUMINATION WITH MULTIPLE U-CODES DTCS

DESCRIPTION:
Some customer vehicles may have a false MIL illumination with multiple U-code DTCs. This condition may be caused if the WDS DLC cable is connected or disconnected while the ignition switch is in the ON position, or when the engine is idling. IMPORTANT: When connecting or disconnecting the WDS DLC cable (or any scan tool equipment) to the DLC-2 connector (under dash), the ignition switch must be in the OFF position, otherwise, the MIL light may come ON and false CAN communication DTC codes may be set in the different CAN bus modules. The following DTCs may be stored if this condition occurs:

U0073-FF-PCM
U0100-FF-TCM
U1900-ABS
U1900-FF-IC
U2516-ABS
U2516-FF-IC

NOTE:It has been reported that some customer vehicles have failed the state emission OBD II test. This may be caused by the inspection station connecting or disconnecting the DLC cable when the ignition switch in the ON position, or when the engine is idling. Customers having this concern should have their vehicle repaired using the following repair procedure.

REPAIR PROCEDURE
1.Verify customer concern.
2.Erase all DTCs.
3.Turn OFF MIL.
4.Turn ignition switch to OFF position.
5.Disconnect WDS DLC or scan tool cable.
6.Verify repair.
NOTE: do not return vehicle to customer with MIL illuminated.

**
There is a PDF of this!!

(( Granted, it says it was fixed but clearly its not 100% (read the forums), plenty of other cars have had this issue Ford and Mazda from 2003 to 2007 ))


Link: http://forum.mazda6club.com/site-suggestions-ideas/273569-new-sub-forum-ecu-bcu-tcu-error-codes.html

=============================
EDIT 2013-11, Add this info.... - PS - Knockoff ELM Blue Tooth Adapter is likely the Root Cause!!!
=============================
U0073 CAN bus is off
U0100 Communication error to PCM, TCM cannot receive any signals from the PCM (ATX only)
U0101 Communication error to TCM - ATX
U0121 Communication error to ABS/TCS HU/CM
U0155 Communication error to instrument cluster
U1900 CAN system communication error
U2516 CAN system wiring harness open or short circuit

Note: Wiring harness is divided into sections:
A leg is to PCM
B leg is to ABS/TCS HU/CM
C leg is A & B to D TCM for ATX equipped cars
D leg is TCM
E leg is to the instrument cluster
E - includes MTX data

Also, CAN wiring consists of a High (CAN +) or (CAN_H) and Low (CAN -) or (CAN_L) pair of wires. These are Twisted Pair.


ABS = Anti lock brake system
- HU/CM = Hydraulic Unit / Control Module (Applicable to ABS units only)
ATX = Automatic Transaxle
ECM = Engine Control Module
MTX = Manual Transaxle
TCM = Transmission Control Module
TCS = Traction Control System
VSS = Vehicle speed sensor

A SNAP SHOT; not specific to our vehicle but it should help!
https://euroesi.mazda.co.jp/esicont/eu_eng/mazda3/20060311105619/html/id0902e6830500.html
https://euroesi.mazda.co.jp/esicont/eu_eng/mazda3/20060311105619/html/id0902e6833700.html
https://euroesi.mazda.co.jp/esicont/eu_eng/mazda3/20060311105619/html/id0902e6858000.html
https://euroesi.mazda.co.jp/esicont/eu_eng/mazda3/20060311105619/html/id0902e6830300.html
https://euroesi.mazda.co.jp/esicont/eu_eng/mazda3/20060311105619/html/id041500801100.html

JJD952
 

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Discussion Starter #32

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Discussion Starter #33
Thought on Diagnoses of continous P030X

This thread (http://forum.mazda6club.com/3-0l-v6/223515-p0301-new-plugs-swapped-coils-code-comes-back.html) lead me to write this;

A V6 owner had a continuous P0301 occur when the car went over 80mph. The thread says COPs and plugs were done as well as moving new COPs about with no change (last post was in 2010, not sure if it was solved.).

Interesting thread - (2009) wonder what ever happened?? Being speed related - leads me to LOAD induced issues. As the speed increases, so does the load on both the Fuel System and the Ignition System. I'd guess 1 of 3 things; Vacuum leak, Insufficient fuel delivery, or ECM. However, if the compression on # 1 was below the others and all were running lean, it may show as a misfire. Also, excessive carbon build up in that hole can create hot spots which detonate under load causing a misfire code.

Looking at REAL TIME SCAN LOG data of Long and Short term fuel trims, O2 output, spark advance, and calculated load should help pin point cause. DTC data would be very helpful.

As was said, but to recap, a P030X can be for anything that makes ONE Cylinder NOT perform on par with the rest. It IS NOT SOLELY DUE TO SPARK, COPs, Plugs. The Crank sensor is feeding the ECM data. If the Velocity of the crank, does not MATCH what the ECM calculated it to be for the conditions - its calls Misfire.

From simple to complex:
Ignition:
Plug gap; Keep at or below spec
-Coils/COPs, known to be weak link. Replace them all or dance moving them about. Write down original location.
-->Wire harness, aged and brittle. Confirm solid connection to COP.

Vacuum leaks:
Don't just listen, but take hoses off the engine and hold them in hands and inspect them. Propane and starter fluid don't open up holes like engine load does. i.e. under high loads the engine moves in the bay pulling and stretching on plumbing! INSPECT IT!!​
- Inspect intake manifold for cracks, warps, bends, defects.
- replace plenum seals (not reuse).
- inspect manifold to head. A leak here would be hard to detect.

Fuel System:
- A single injector could go bad but I find it rare for one to plug while the others are fine. Wires break, connections get loose but don't rule it out. Swapping from one location to another is your best bet. Just don't do it at the same time as a coil pack move.
- Fuel Pressure. Lack of fuel pressure usually show up under load. A pressure gauge can verify this. Scan tools will help too.

Engine Health:
Cylinders that move oil can foul plugs.
- Check the compression.
- Add a small amount of oil to cylinder and check it again. If low cylinder goes up, the rings are not sealing. If the valves are leaking it doesn't change the compression numbers.

ECU/ECM:
As was noted in this thread - we are dealing with electronics. A bad component can cause misfires. The ECM is composed of inputs, outputs, CPU, Memory maps, logic, drivers, voltage regulators and all kinds of other stuff. Output to the coils and injects: Coils need about 300 to 400 volts to drive them. This circuit can die and cause misfires. The injectors require much less energy but also rely on a driver to output a signal.
- An Oscilloscope connected to these circuits (driver circuits to coils/injectors) can easily see when one is NOT LIKE THE OTHERS. This was common place in the 80's and 90's but shops went away from them and lost touch with how to diagnose issues efficiently.

DRIVING STYLE AND OWNER USE:
Short trips - aka grocery getters need the oil changed more often, need new plugs more often, need fuel cleaners in higher doses. If you drive 6 miles a day making many stops, expect to replace plugs and oil at the MINIMUM INTERVAL!! Add fuel cleaners (Techron for example) every 3 to 4 months.

The rest of us should use fuel cleaners a couple times a year just to remove the water and build up in the system. Each time an engine is turned off, the vapor from burned and unburned fuel lingers in the cylinders. As the engine cools this vapor accumulates as a solid on the injectors. Over time the injectors pattern can be compromised esp on DD that go short distances.

I've done it again.... :cool:
:eek::eek::eek: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
On-board diagnostic [aw6a-el]

ON-BOARD DIAGNOSTIC [AW6A-EL]
**************************************************
P0601 Flash ROM malfunction
P0603 EEPROM malfunction
P0604 RAM malfunction
P0706 Transaxle range (TR) switch circuit range/performance
P0707 Transaxle range (TR) switch circuit low input
P0708 Transaxle range (TR) switch circuit high input
P0711 Transaxle fluid temperature (TFT) sensor malfunction (stuck)
P0712 Transaxle fluid temperature (TFT) sensor circuit malfunction (short to ground)
P0713 Transaxle fluid temperature (TFT) sensor circuit malfunction (short to power/open circuit)
P0717 Input/turbine speed sensor circuit malfunction (open circuit/short circuit
P0722 Vehicle speed sensor (VSS) circuit malfunction (open circuit/short circuit)
P0729 Gear 6 incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0730 Gear 1and engine brake operation incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0731 Gear 1 incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0732 Gear 2 incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0733 Gear 3 incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0734 Gear 4 incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0735 Gear 5 incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0736 Gear reverse incorrect (incorrect gear ratio detected)
P0780 Valve control solenoid circuit malfunction (valve stuck)
P0817 Starter relay No.2 circuit malfunction (open circuit/short circuit)
P0819 Manual switch/up switch/down switch circuit malfunction (open circuit/short circuit)
P0882 TCM B+ low – –
P0883 TCM B+ high – –
P0942 Valve control solenoid circuit malfunction at D range (valve stuck)
P0961 Line pressure control solenoid range/performance (stuck)
P0962 Line pressure control solenoid circuit malfunction (short to ground/open circuit)
P0963 Line pressure control solenoid circuit malfunction (short to power)
P0973 Shift solenoid A circuit malfunction (short to ground)
P0974 Shift solenoid A circuit malfunction (short to power/open circuit)
P0976 Shift solenoid B circuit malfunction (short to ground)
P0977 Shift solenoid B circuit malfunction (short to power/open circuit)
P0978 Shift solenoid C range/performance (stuck)
P0979 Shift solenoid C circuit malfunction (short to ground/open circuit)
P0980 Shift solenoid C circuit malfunction (short to power)
P0981 Shift solenoid D range/performance (stuck)
P0982 Shift solenoid D circuit malfunction (short to ground/open circuit)
P0983 Shift solenoid D circuit malfunction (short to power)
P0984 Shift solenoid E range/performance (stuck)
P0985 Shift solenoid E circuit malfunction (short to ground/open circuit)
P0986 Shift solenoid E circuit malfunction (short to power)
P0997 Shift solenoid F range/performance (stuck)
P0998 Shift solenoid F circuit malfunction (short to ground/open circuit)
P0999 Shift solenoid F circuit malfunction (short to power)
P1700 Valve control solenoid circuit malfunction at R range (valve stuck)
P2757 Torque converter clutch (TCC) (stuck off)
P2758 Torque converter clutch (TCC) (stuck on)
P2762 TCC control solenoid range/performance (stuck)
P2763 TCC control solenoid circuit malfunction (short to power)
P2764 TCC control solenoid circuit malfunction (short to ground/open circuit)
U0073 CAN BUS OFF
U0100 TCM cannot receive any signals from PCM
U0121 TCM cannot receive any signals from ABS HU/CM
U0140 TCM cannot receive any signals from instrument cluster
U0415 Invalid data received from ABS HU/CM (wheel speed)

**************************************************

Acronyms:
ABS - Antilock Brake System
ATF - Automatic Transaxle Fluid
ATX - Automatic Transaxle
CAN - Controller Area Network
CCM - Comprehensive Component Monitor
CM - Control Module
CPU - Central Processing Unit
DC - Drive Cycle
EC-AT - Electronically Controlled Automatic Transaxle
HU - Hydraulic Unit
MAX - Maximum
MTX - Manual Transaxle
O/D - Overdrive
PID - Parameter Identification
RAM - Random Access Memory
ROM - Read Only Memory
TFT - Transaxle Fluid Temperature
WDS - Worldwide Diagnostic System
1GR First Gear
2GR Second Gear
5GR Fifth Gear
6GR Sixth Gear

PID SIMULATION FUNCTION [AW6A-EL]
BOO: - TCM Brake switch On/Off
DTCCNT: - DTC count (includes those needing no action)
DWN: - SW Down switch On/Off A4
ECT: - TCM ECT °C, °F
FDPDTC: - Freeze frame data
GEAR_RA: - Gear ratio
GEAR_SEL: - Calculated gear range in TCM 1st/2nd/3rd/4th/5th/6th
LPS: - Pressure control solenoid A B1, B3
MNL: - SW M range switch On/Off A7
OSS: - Output shaft speed RPM B19, B20
PNP_TCM: - Park/Neutral Drive/Neutral
RPM TCM: - Engine speed RPM
SSC: - Shift solenoid C A B10, B11
SSD: - Shift solenoid D A B17, B18
SSE: - Shift solenoid E A B14, B22
SSF: - Shift solenoid F A B16, B21
TCCC: - TCC solenoid valve A B4, B9
TFT: - ATF temperature °C, °F B7, B8
TFTV: - ATF temperature signal voltage V B7, B8
THOP: - Throttle position %
TR: - TR switch R/N/D/P
TRD: - TR switch [D range] On/Off
TRR: - TR switch [R position] On/Off
TSS: - Input/turbine speed sensor RPM
UP: - SW Up switch On/Off A3
VSS: - Vehicle speed KPH, MPH

The PID mode allows access to certain data values, analog and digital input and output, calculations and system state information.



**************************************************

1st Gen Guide to trannies and fluid types...
 

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I must say I have completely overlooked this thread being on another forum way more, and wish I hadn't. Maybe could have saved my engine. Nonetheless, great info and awesome member!
 

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Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Inside the Flip Key and some PNs to get a replacement:
FROM: http://forum.mazda6club.com/electrical/119494-keyless-remote-entry-2.html#post3491755

As of 2013-01-27, here is a thread in the Mazda 3 forum with pictures and instructions on how to open the Flip key and swap the battery. How to: Replace flip key battery - Mazda3 Forums : The #1 Mazda 3 Forum

Like everyone else who bought a used car, it came with just one key. I needed details on what to buy so I opened with thoughts of a fleebay purchase.
PS - Inside the Flip Key are mechanical switches so don't throw them in the drink as they don't clean as easy as a TV remote with a soft membrane. If they do get wet, remove the battery and through it in a bag of rice.

Its pretty easy to open once you see the detent to press inside the flip area, the end comes right off. What is not intuitive is opening the case. It opens like a clam shell. Pry and split at the Visteon label area hinging at the key chain area. Walla - opens.
The battery measured 3.067 volts so its fine. If you remove and handle the circuit board; use caution as its static sensitive and can be damaged by an ESD charge. i.e. don't shuffle your feet across the carpet and touch it or you might kill it. Touch something like a grounded chassis .i.e. a computer case, stove, faucet and then open and handle the remote guts (PCBA).

For the people who lost your remote:
The case has this information:
FCC ID: KPU41788
IC 4238A-41525
MAKER: VISTEON
No. :41524

Internal the PCBA: 41780-501-40R
Manuf: epc FRY4R-C 94V0 05-49


Battery: Panasonic CR-1620 3V




HOW TO PROGRAM A KEYLESS REMOTE:
I made this as its not like the process found on the web or in this thread (http://forum.mazda6club.com/electrical/119494-keyless-remote-entry-3.html#post3528590). Hopefully it saves one of us. This is a tad different than what others have posted, Give it a go and see what happens.

  • Application is First Gen Mazda 6, but may work on other years for those replacement Fobs.
Final Impact



****************************************
IGNITION KEY TRANSPONDER!!!!
For the 2006 model year there are two ranges of key transponders. So, if you buy a used key that has not been identified, you have a 50/50 chance of that key working in your ignition.
2013-11 I got lucky. Bought a used key from http://www.autotransponder.com/2006_mazda_6_remote_key_4238a-41524 for $64, programmed the fob using instructions up there and paid the local locksmith $33 to cut the key and program the ECM. Took just as long to program the ECM as it did to cut the key. Also inquired about how many keys my car has programmed to it. The count was 3 before adding this one today (I have one two others remain at large).

****************************************


Info: how how to make the ECM accept a replacement key.
You pretty much have to have 2 to make a 3rd one work. Download the FSM it goes into detail about how this is done. Plus you need the services listed below or in the first post of this thread. However, if you have 2 you can tell the ECM to accept another. It will store up to 8. If you know how to progam PID into the torque App, you can likely read the PID that tells how many keys have been programmed to the ECM. The PID is: "NUMKEYS" which tells the PAT software the Number of keys stored in the module.

Look at this site; read the Grey Text.
Special Tools & Information
-
Immobilizer and PATS Codes
Immobilizer Codes*
Immobilizer Codes are provided by purchasing subscription access to the query form on this website. Upon filling out and sending the form, you will receive the the results by email at the address specified in your Mazda Service Info account. The email will be sent to you within the next 24 hours on weekdays, or next business day on Fridays or weekends, excluding holidays. Information you will need to provide on the form includes: Your Business Name, Business License Number, VIN, Immobilizer Serial Number and contact information.
PATS Codes*
Applies to Mazda2, Mazda3, Mazda5, Mazda6, CX-5, CX-7, CX-9, MX-5, and RX-8. PATS Codes are provided by purchasing subscription access to the query form on this website. Upon filling out and sending the form, you will receive the the results by email at the address specified in your Mazda Service Info account. The email will be sent to you within the next 24 hours on weekdays, or next business day on Fridays or weekends, excluding holidays. Information you will need to provide on the form includes: Your Business Name, a valid business permit number (or a valid State or Federal tax ID number), Technician ID, VIN, Model Type, Request reason, Pats Out Code and contact information.​
-

https://mazda.locksmithsdrm.com/ma-sdrm/


Security Professional Emergency Key Request

In order to retrieve your Key Code and Vehicle Pin you need to be registered with the Associated Locksmiths of America (ALOA).

If you have not registered, please click HERE to be directed to the ALOA registration process.

If you have already registered with ALOA and would like to proceed, please select a product below to begin.
Vehicle Key Code Request ($10.00)
Passive Anti-Theft System Code Request ($10.00)
Immobilizer Code Request ($10.00)


Is this saying match the KEY to the CAR? We all pay up the nose to match our car to the replacement KEY & FOB. Hmm....

IDS Software
PCM (ECU) Reflashing
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Is my PRE-CAT Three Way Catalytic Converter (TWC) working

TOOLS:
You need OBD scanner that can show live O2 data. To be accurate, it must be able to plot two graphs from 2 sensors simultaneously.

You can make do with for example the Torque App but only if you can compare the same period of time and repeat it several times without error.

Here is how:

  • Drive vehicle for a minimum of 10 min at 40 - 60 mph
  • Turn it off, connect OBD reader/APP which can display live O2 sensor data.
  • Start engine ASAP once connected, allow to idle.
  • Select a bank. Example B1S1. Count the number of upstream inversions (B1S1) and divide it by the number of downstream inversions B1S2.
NOTE: an inversion is defined as: The number of times the graphed sensor signal crosses the 0.5V threshold. It is NOT counting the peaks but the number of times the signal rises upwards over the 0.5v threshold AND counting the number of times it descends downward crossing the 0.5v line.

In short; if the downstream O2 sensor mirrors your upstream O2 sensor, the Pre-CAT is bad.

I didn't snap shot a picture of the downstream sensor but you get the idea.

If the ratio is = 1.5 or greater, its OK (no MIL codes) and a higher inversion ratio is better.

In the example here there are 14 inversions (crossing the 0.5V threshold). Sorry. no downstream pictures but it only crossed once. Notice there is a tiny 0.5 on the left and it does graph time so if both wave forms repeat consistently at idle, one can get an idea as to the health of the pre-cat.


Ratio is 14/1 = 14 which is much greater than 1.5

As an example of BAD or defective TWC - lets say it was 14 upstream and 10 downstream at idle.

Ratio is 14/10 = 1.4 = defective TWC.

EXAMPLE:
OTHER SOFTWARE / PRODUCTS CAN GRAPH MORE THAN ONE SENSOR!

In this example its only to show that other products would be better. You're looking at 2 sensors on a V6 both are upstream.
If this were upstream and downstream, I would guess someone punched out the pre-cat. Something to consider when buying a car!
 

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Discussion Starter #39
HOW TO PROGRAM A KEYLESS REMOTE:
I made this as its not like the process found on the web or in this thread (http://forum.mazda6club.com/electrical/119494-keyless-remote-entry-3.html#post3528590). Hopefully it saves one of us. This is a tad different than what others have posted, Give it a go and see what happens.

  • Application is First Gen Mazda 6, but may work on other years for those replacement Fobs.
Final Impact

  • Just wanted to add that this PROCESS WORKED ON MY 2006! In less than 60 seconds from start to finish a spare Flip Key was accepted by the security system. One variation is this; After pressing the last fob button twice (doors locked & unlocked), when I removed the key from the ignition, the doors locked and unlocked twice. Tested both remotes and both seem to work.
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Timing chain install 3.0 v6 vvt

WORK IN PROGRESS...... READ THIS: I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGES INCURRED FROM USING THE INFORMATION POSTED HERE. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!! WORK IN PROGRESS! PICTURES ARE FOR REFERENCE ONLY!

Things to NOTE:
You can place the cams in s "NEUTRAL POSITION" so the piston does not HIT THEM. Depending on what happened and what you need to do to fix your current problem, this is HIGHLY ADVISABLE!!!! See pic below. I CAN NOT CONFIRM THIS WORKS!! USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!

Other than that - :eek:
Bank 2 Chain Install : Cylinder one on TDC cams as indicated below. Crank spline (keyway) should be at 11 O'clock. Line up the cams and count the links. Bank 2 INTAKE is 42 links from the dimple to timing mark Flycut on Crank Gear. Bank 2 Exhaust is 29 links from the dimple to timing mark on crank. Note: 13 links separate I from E. Install guides, Collapse and install TTC on B2.

BANK 1 Chain Install: Rotate crank so keyway is at 3 O'Clock! Bank 1 INTAKE is 29 links from dimple to crank gear index! NOTE CAM LOCATION! Bank 1 Exhaust is 42 links from dimple to crank gear index.

Inside the VVT, Advance & Retard Chambers plus Stop pin:
When oil pressure is low or when starting, VVT is on the Stop Pin.

  • The Variable Valve Timing (VVT) actuator consists of tip seals, a housing, and rotor.
  • The housing is bolted to the timing chain gear.
  • The rotor is bolted to the intake camshaft and can move clockwise or counter clockwise inside of the housing depending upon Oil Control Valve (OCV) pressure directed to the advance (A) and retard (R) oil chambers.
  • Prior to engine start-up, the rotor is held in a full retard position by a stopper pin.
  • The stopper pin mechanically locks the rotor to the housing.
  • After engine start-up, oil pressure pushes the stopper pin into the rotor releasing the rotor and allows the oil control valve to control intake camshaft timing.
3.0 V6 w/VVT:


Bank 1 Cylinder 1 on TDC, Time to count links....
This is how it should be timed. Note: Crank at 11 O'Clock position. Note location of cam gears.


Crankshaft Drive Gear Indexed at TDC:


Setting Bank 1 Camshafts in Neutral Position, Crank is Rotated 120 degrees CW The Reference material "IMPLIES" the PISTON SHOULD NOT HIT THE VALVES when Set as shown!! USE CAUTION!!!!!


Both banks at Neutral Position


Installing Bank 2. Chain is taught, count links as shown. Crank at TDC:
When installing the Bank 2 timing chain confirm the following:
  • Crankshaft is in the 11 o’clock position.
  • Align crankshaft timing mark with paint mark on Bank 2 timing chain.
  • There must be 29 links from the crankshaft timing mark to the exhaust camshaft timing mark.
  • There must be 13 links (30-42) from the exhaust camshaft timing mark to the intake camshaft timing mark.


Installing Bank 1. Chain is taught, count links as shown. Crank at 120 degrees ATDC:
When installing the Bank 1 timing chain confirm the following:
  • Rotate the crankshaft clockwise 120°from the 11 o’clock position to the 3 o’clock position.
  • Align crankshaft timing mark with paint mark on Bank 1 timing chain.
  • There must be 29 links from the crankshaft timing mark to the intake camshaft timing mark.
  • There must be 13 links (30-42) from the intake camshaft timing mark to the exhaust camshaft timing mark.


CKP at TDC Cyl#1
Fig. 1 – If the crankshaft position sensor (CKP) is located on the Bank 1 side of the engine, the 5th tooth from the missing tooth will line up with the CKP.


CKP Bank2
If the crankshaft position sensor (CKP) is located on the Bank 2 side of the engine, the 5th tooth from the missing tooth will line up with the CKP.
 

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