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You can easily place the engine in the engine bay all by itself. Everything else is expensive and very hard. You also would need to spend a small fortune in tuning just to see if it might run.
 

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With a swap like that, it would be best to buy an entire car as a donor vehicle. This way in theory you have everything needed to make the engine run inside a different vehicle. I would think that the standard and the v6 would have different transmissions as well. You would have to take that into account.

The question would still remain on how close are the 2 stamped together. Will the front subframe swap over? Does the v6 version have a different brake system than the standard? (I'm a 1st gen man so idk)

Yes it's doable but how much time and money is one willing to spend to do it right. If you don't buy a donor vehicle (running and driving) to try something like this and you piece everything together, it becomes a nickel and dime project trying to get it running.
 

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^^ What DJ Ray said; a swap between drivetrains will mean at the very least the electronics (wiring loom, sensors, and ECU, as well as possibly the alternator, A/C compressor, etc) between the two engines would need to also be swapped, as well as engine mounts, and as he suggested, maybe even the subframe, springs, brakes, and so on. Even accessories like the A/C compressor and alternator might need swapped. It's likely you would need to swap transmissions as well; even if the 4 and 6 cyls use the same transmission (idk), it's not likely they have the same final drive ratio, so it would be likely the original would have the v6 spinning needlessly fast, especially in top gear. For this to be feasible and affordable, you'd be best to find a good-condition insurance write-off that got hit at the back to use as a donor car, so you could get all the bits you need off of it.

I did a swap something like this, between a 95 and 96 Passat VR6 - my focus was more to get the good manual gearbox and clutch bits out of the wrecked, but running and driveable 95 into a low-miles 96 with a very expensive-to-repair slushbox that I had picked up for a song. Even though the engines were nominally the same, and I didn't have to swap or even depressurize the AC bits, I still had to make adaptations to the wiring to trick the car into thinking it was in park so it could start,, wire in the reverse lights, and so on (and strip out a big loom and separate powertrain control computer that ran the autobox from under the rear seat).

I figure it took me about 120 hours of work to get it all done (which did include some extra swapping of nicer interior bits, plus my Koni yellows and some other good suspension bits from the donor car, and was done in Dec-January in an unheated garage in Canadian winter, so it was fricking cold (a lot of days in the -15C to -30C range), which added time). It only made sense because I was unemployed, and therefore had time, but not a lot of money on my hands, and am pretty mechanically handy. Because the manual transission was a popular swap, I also had forum help from VWVortex to guide me through the electrical - if this swap isn't covered here or elsewhere, you'll get to discover any issues in terms of things that might keep the swapped drivetrain from talking to the ECU and, in newer cars, the body controller and security electronics, to meet all conditions needed to start and run.

In other words, these sorts of things can take a lot more time than you might guess, and you need to be prepared for more than just the mechanical basics).
 

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The last swap I did the only thing left from the original vehicle was the body, switches, pigtails and some suspension parts. I had to even swap over the steering column and dash for it to even want to start. My camaro was down for 6 months due to the project but in the end, it was well worth it.

Op, if you decide to take on a project like this, do your homework 1st. Find out what is common between the 2 cars, what may be needed, and what may need to be custom.

While on the subject, I'm waiting on 1 last piece of information about doing a nice swap into my 1st gen. I have been researching and reading for the past xx months about what I would need, how to make everything work together, and how to get it done safely. I've spent countless hours looking at schematics from both vehicles to see what is what. I know that some things will need to be custom made and I already know where to get these done at. In other words, homework is key. I even have a drastic plan B in case if it doesn't work the 1st way I install everything. I'm looking to have a 1 week to 1 month down time depending on how everything goes together.

With trying a new type of swap that has never been done before, you're going to be on your own and to know as much as you can about the 2 different powertrains before hand will help with headaches as well as down time.
 
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