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It's not exactly winter in Texas yet, and I have 2 months before I drive my MS6 back to Ohio, but so far in the morning when my car has been sitting all night it seems to warm up fast. I start it up and let it idle down slowly from 2 or 3k rpm down to 1k, then drive her slowly till the temp needle rises. I've noticed, however, that it doesn't take long at all for that needle to reach a normal operating temp.

Is this something specific to this engine, or am I just jumping the gun and should wait for colder weather effects?
 

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It's not exactly winter in Texas yet, and I have 2 months before I drive my MS6 back to Ohio, but so far in the morning when my car has been sitting all night it seems to warm up fast. I start it up and let it idle down slowly from 2 or 3k rpm down to 1k, then drive her slowly till the temp needle rises. I've noticed, however, that it doesn't take long at all for that needle to reach a normal operating temp.

Is this something specific to this engine, or am I just jumping the gun and should wait for colder weather effects?
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In winter it takes forever to warm up. Well, in sub-zero temperatures that is.
 

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Well, speaking from experience in the past two days in Ohio, its taking my speed6 about twice as long to warm up in this lovely 32* weather compared to the 60*'s and higher we've had before. It takes my car about a mile driving at 45mph to warm up, while before about a half mile. Its faster than my old Grand Prix, that's for sure.

Last night was the first night I let my car sit in a parking lot for two hours and the temp gauge went all the way back to cold. Then again, it was low 30's last night anyways.
 

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in the N/A 2.3 mzr in my old mazda3, the needle would start climbing so quickly i felt like the car never cooled down! more impressive was the speed at which the heater air would get warm. i spend my winters in the snowiest city in the US, Syracuse (yeah 170 inches of snow per year! lol), so it's not for lack of a real winter either.

i would imagine that this being the same basic block, and with the turbo only adding heat to the mix, that it would be similarly quick in heating up. i doubt the disi would have too great an effect on such a thing...i guess we'll found out whats shakin in a few more weeks.
 

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It's designed to heat up fast for emissions purposes. It's rated as ULEV (ultra low emissions vehicle).
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The catalytic converter is designed to warm up (light off) quickly to decrease emissions upon startup. This is why it's placed on the downpipe close to the turbo. This, however, is a completely different from having the engine completely warm.

First thing to note is that the temperature guage is essentially an idiot light in guage form. It gives no useful information, as it will read the same over a wide range of temperatures. This, apparently, gives Joe and Jane Public peace of mind over how good their car's cooling system is regardless of actual temp variations.

The second thing to note is that when the guage reads "up to temperature", the engine actually isn't. Remember the order in which things warm up: Coolant first, then oil. Once the oil is up to temp, then the engine is actually warm and all the expansion that is going to take place has. Beating on your engine (full throttle, full boost, high rpm) before this point will take it's toll from a wear point of view.

Full warm up will take 10-15 minutes, depending upon ambient temperature, the mass of your engine components and coolant/oil capacity. It's best done while driving the car gently at first, slowly increasing your shift points and throttle input. Letting it warm up on your driveway will serve to dilute your oil with fuel and won't warm up other critical driveline components such as the transmission and rear diff.
 

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Its not the engine that's warming up faster. What you're seeing is Mazda put in a high quality coolant temp gauge and sensor that actually responds. Many cars have very crappy gauges that won't even start to move until the car is near operating temperature.
 

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Full warm up will take 10-15 minutes, depending upon ambient temperature, the mass of your engine components and coolant/oil capacity. It's best done while driving the car gently at first, slowly increasing your shift points and throttle input. Letting it warm up on your driveway will serve to dilute your oil with fuel and won't warm up other critical driveline components such as the transmission and rear diff.
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So what is the best way to "Warm Up" the car before spirited driving? Parking Lot for a few minutes then easy <2.5k shifts for about 10-15 minutes?
 

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So what is the best way to "Warm Up" the car before spirited driving? Parking Lot for a few minutes then easy <2.5k shifts for about 10-15 minutes?
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You don't need to idle for more than 30 seconds to a minute or so (just enough to get the oil circulating). After that, drive gently, just as you describe.
 

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Its not the engine that's warming up faster. What you're seeing is Mazda put in a high quality coolant temp gauge and sensor that actually responds. Many cars have very crappy gauges that won't even start to move until the car is near operating temperature.
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Actually - many cars have a very different placement for the temp gauge relative to the thermostat such that, until the thermostat cracks open to provide cooling because the car is at/approaching temp, it will appear that the car all of a sudden is warm/warming up as the warm coolant then hits the temp gauge.

I hope Mazda didn't put all of the gauge budget into the temp gauge components at the cost of a boost gauge. :blink:
 
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