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Discussion Starter #1
I was checking my car today and noticed that my engine coolant fluid is below the LOW mark. Should I take it to the dealership to get it filled or just buy some engine coolants. Its an 05 and still under warranty. Does it cover filling up the engine coolant? If not what type of coolant does 05 v6 ATX take?
 

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You can top it off yourself, check the color of your coolant before you top it off. If it's orange, it's DexCool, I saw 06s are blue colored, so my guess is they don't use DexCool for new ones, not sure for your 05 though.

You can also go to the dealer for an oil change, they should get you a full circle check, during that check they can top off the coolant for free.

If you need to top off coolant very frequently, definately take it to the dealer, there might be a leak or engine burning coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The manual doesnt mention anything about what type of coolant it uses. Just says if the coolant is low, you should take it to the dealership. I really dont want to pay the dealership money when I can do it myself. Just need to find out what type it is.....
 

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FYI

Just saw this on the shelf at Wally World:

New Prestone® Extended Life Antifreeze/Coolant is compatible with ANY antifreeze/ coolant – regardless of color – for use in ALL makes and models of cars and light duty trucks. This patented formula provides a high degree of performance durability and carefully balanced protection against temperature extremes and rust corrosion of all cooling system metals, including aluminum.[/b]
 

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The coolant in the 05 is the same thing as Dexcool from GM.Hearing that the 06 has something blue in it is news to me.I have only seen the orange coolant in them all and i work for a mazda dealership.
 

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FYI

Just saw this on the shelf at Wally World:
[/b]

Is that stuff ok to use? Or is it best to just stick with the dexcool?

It would be nice to use something generic like that for all my cars since each car uses a diffrent kind.
 

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FYI

Just saw this on the shelf at Wally World:
[/b]
That advertising has been in and out of court for all of 2006, it's still pending further independent tests to see if it is actually compatible. In Ford's own tests they found it not to be compatible and recommend you only use to the coolant that came with the vehicle due to the chemistry and additives packages differences. Your standard green coolant is IAT, Inorganic Additive Technology, orange/Dexcool is OAT, Orange Acid Technology, HOAT is what you find in these "universal coolants".

IAT coolant is fast acting and very protective coolant but requires an often change period.

OAT coolant is constructed of carbon-based molecules, typically organic acids, to protect cooling system metals. It has a very long service life, except in a fast corrosion condition, such as boiling. It is not backwards compatible with IAT coolant.

HOAT coolant uses both inorganic and organic carbon-based additives for a long service life. HOAT can SOMETIMES replace IAT green coolant in older vehicles, but is not recommended to replace OAT orange.

There are only three chemistry packages for coolant, but there are roughly 10 to 12 different coolant colors. All coolants are water white before the dye is added, it really depends on where you live, the US, Europe, Asia, they all have their own colors picked out for their coolants.
 

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Wow. I didn't know about the claim challenge.

Just to add more gasoline to the fire, there's considerable talk that stipulates Prestone® Extended Life Antifreeze/Coolant is a "Dex-Clone." Some say that it is essentially Dex-Cool (or a clone thereof) that is dyed green. I'm going to make a Wally World run again tonight to check on the ingredients, for starters.

...orange/Dexcool is OAT, Orange Acid Technology...[/b]
You mean organic, not orange right? I got a laugh from it because your misspelling is very apt. :laugh:
 

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Wow. I didn't know about the claim challenge.

Just to add more gasoline to the fire, there's considerable talk that stipulates Prestone® Extended Life Antifreeze/Coolant is a "Dex-Clone." Some say that it is essentially Dex-Cool (or a clone thereof) that is dyed green. I'm going to make a Wally World run again tonight to check on the ingredients, for starters.
You mean organic, not orange right? I got a laugh from it because your misspelling is very apt. :laugh:
[/b]
It is my understanding from what I have read and if you look at the jug carefully that the Prestone Extended life is OAT technology and they either add orange dye for their "DEXCOOL" jug or the green dye for their conventional product. In other words their "green" coolant is not the coolant it used to be. It is all OAT technology and if changing from conventional coolant you should be aware of that and either buy a different brand that is truly an old style coolant or do a very complete flush. As far as I know the 03-05 Mazda 6 in the US uses a "Dexcool" type coolant. If you go to the dealer they are probably adding the Motorcraft Orange coolant which is an OAT type coolant like "DEXCOOL".
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well I bought the prestone extended life. Bought it at Autozone. The clerk looked at my car info and said the 50/50 Prestone Extend Life should be fine with my car. The color was not orange but the bottle state it will work with any type of make and model. I hope I didnt make a mistake....
 

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Well I bought the prestone extended life. Bought it at Autozone. The clerk looked at my car info and said the 50/50 Prestone Extend Life should be fine with my car. The color was not orange but the bottle state it will work with any type of make and model. I hope I didnt make a mistake.... [/b]
I'm curious, exactly what does Mazda specify for the Mazda6? I have a 2006, is its coolant spec different than the 2003-2005 models?

And if you actually believed the guy at autozone, you did make a mistake. my son worked there for a couple months, he walked in the door at 17 knowing more about cars than the manager of the store.
 

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It is interesting.

Ford (and Chrysler) now have used HOAT (G05), with silicates and nitrates, for about 5 years as their long life coolant. Ford did not like Dexcool, as the 2-EH in the acid mix attacked some plastics, and it had concerns about cavitation at the water pump. Mercedes has used G05 for a long time.

Japan does not use silicates, likely due to very hard water there, and seems to go for Dexcool (no silicates) in the Ford engine'd mazdas. It seems to work. Audi and VW also went this way. My personal experience with retro use in older cars is that they would have small capilary leaks all over the place, and switching to G05 stopped the leaks (silicates = stop leak)

The prestone EL is the same as their dexcool stuff, both having 2-EH. If mazda uses dexcool, it's the right substitute, although Ford would wine less if Peak Global were used in their Fusion 3.0's, as it is an OAT with no 2-EH.
 

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It is interesting.

Ford (and Chrysler) now have used HOAT (G05), with silicates and nitrates, for about 5 years as their long life coolant. Ford did not like Dexcool, as the 2-EH in the acid mix attacked some plastics, and it had concerns about cavitation at the water pump. Mercedes has used G05 for a long time.

Japan does not use silicates, likely due to very hard water there, and seems to go for Dexcool (no silicates) in the Ford engine'd mazdas. It seems to work. Audi and VW also went this way. My personal experience with retro use in older cars is that they would have small capilary leaks all over the place, and switching to G05 stopped the leaks (silicates = stop leak)

The prestone EL is the same as their dexcool stuff, both having 2-EH. If mazda uses dexcool, it's the right substitute, although Ford would wine less if Peak Global were used in their Fusion 3.0's, as it is an OAT with no 2-EH.
[/b]
Didn't the cavitation problems only tend to be with a low coolant level when air got into the system? I agree that Ford for most of its own vehicles seems to prefer the G05 and overall it is probably superior, but it seems that Mazda did go for the Dexcool being a Japan based automaker. My 6 actually seeps coolant from most of the hose fittings which is annoying, but it never really looses much. The GM cars I have seen have not seemed to have this problem.
 

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My understanding is that Japanese automakers tend to use phosphated HOAT coolants... and that Euros and Ford use silicated HOATs. GM uses OAT (DexCool).

I would think that it's safe to use a G-05 formula in the 6, being as that all the other Duratec based vehicles get G-05. I thought Crossbow (back in the day) talked about flushing out the Dex and running G-05, for the better protection against air and caviatation.

Hmmm, I wonder if he ever got around to switching?
 

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I'm curious, exactly what does Mazda specify for the Mazda6? I have a 2006, is its coolant spec different than the 2003-2005 models?

And if you actually believed the guy at autozone, you did make a mistake. my son worked there for a couple months, he walked in the door at 17 knowing more about cars than the manager of the store.
[/b]
If anybody ever gets a definitive answer from Mazda what is in there, there are a lot of us who would like to know.

When I had my '04 wagon (V6) in the shop of an independent and highly respected mechanic for other service, I asked them to determine what the coolant was that was in the cooling system. They did check, and when I picked up my car, had an answer for me, "Damned if we can figure it out: it's a mystery to us, too."

And here is an article that appeared two days ago in the Portland Oregonian:

Dex-Cool continues to cause problems
Saturday, November 04, 2006
CHIP KEEN SPECIAL WRITER
The Oregonian

Q: My 2000 Dodge 3500 van with 38,000 miles on it has been virtually
trouble free until two weeks ago. The heater stopped working, so I
took it to the dealer who has performed all of its services since
about 18,000 miles. The thermostat was stuck open, and the cooling
system was full of "gunk." They put in a new thermostat and water
pump, but also recommended replacing the heater core and radiator. I
asked for and received a sample of the gunk. Is there a place where I
can get it analyzed? Can something break down over time and
contaminate the coolant? They flushed it at 23,000 miles. -- Jill
Miller, West Linn

A: There are many analytical laboratories capable of performing the
service, but save your money. Despite the previous care given to your
van's cooling system, what's broken down over time -- and contaminated
the coolant -- is the coolant itself.

General Motors and Texaco introduced the first "extended life
coolant," Dex-Cool, 10 years ago. With a recommended service interval
of 100,000 miles or five years, it was heralded as a step forward in
reducing both maintenance costs and hazardous waste streams. Other
manufacturers quickly followed suit.

Experience has shown that Dex-Cool can cause many more problems that
it solves.

Early in 2001, this column departed from its usual question-and-answer
format to warn: "Technicians all over North America report that
Dex-Cool can turn into rusty jelly well before the 60,000 mile mark --
even, in some cases, in as little at 30,000 miles. The jellied coolant
is extremely difficult to remove from the system. Depending upon the
severity of the problem, the heater core, radiator, and core plugs may
need to be removed and/or replaced. Repairs can cost hundreds dollars
or more, and aren't easily performed at home."

In the premier issue of Master Technician magazine
(www.mastertechmag.com), editor Bob Freudenberger further explains
that Dex-Cool is "based on Organic Acid Technology (OAT), and its
additive package can keep corrosion away for a very long time indeed.

"The trouble is, this admirable property is defeated by one simple
thing: air. If the coolant level in the system should be allowed to
drop so that all surfaces aren't continually immersed, oxidation
occurs rapidly. The dusty deposits that form accumulate into ugly glop
that clogs up the works."

Freudenberger further explains that a primary organic acid in OAT,
sodium 2-ethyl hexanoate, is known to soften certain plastics. Given
the increasing use of plastics in modern engines -- including
waterpump impellers in many Chrysler V-8s -- OAT is now the primary
culprit in many of today's cooling system problems.

What to do? If your vehicle is still under warranty, and
factory-filled with OAT, have the cooling system checked and serviced
regularly, and keep it topped up with OAT to maintain the warranty.

In all other cases, have the OAT coolant removed, and the system
thoroughly flushed. Refilling with tried-and-true green antifreeze
should work just fine if you don't mind returning to a two-year
cooling system service interval.

If you want to stay modern, refill with a coolant meeting European
"G-05" standards. These coolants use a Hybrid Organic Acid Technology
(HOAT) that provides the longevity of OAT without its risks.

Chip Keen, a writer from Washington, owned a car repair business for
many years. He has an ASE certification as a Master Automotive
Technician. Mail questions to him c/o DriveTime, The Oregonian, 1320
S.W. Broadway, Portland, OR 97201, or send e-mail to
[email protected]. Only published inquiries will receive
responses.

©2006 The Oregonian
 
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