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Yes. They eat up pads much faster than blank rotors. They'd even crack after one or two track seasons.

If you only use them for daily driving, it's ok. But they're not recommended for track use.
 

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Yes. They eat up pads much faster than blank rotors. They'd even crack after one or two track seasons.

If you only use them for daily driving, it's ok. But they're not recommended for track use. [/b]

you're joking, of course..???
 

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i've been running my drilled/slotted rotors for over 2 years now, 9+ track events and about 30k miles....no issues at all. on second set of pads with the setup.
 

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not for daily driving, it makes no difference at all. on the track is where it produces issues. i've read through Brembo's design book from front to back and the extra cooling the holes provide make for too much temp range on the track, leading to cracking ins some cases.
 

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no he isn't. http://forum.mazda6club.com/index.php?showtopic=34316 stickies ftw. From an engineering standpoint it makes too much sense to stay away from slotted/crossdrilled
[/b]
Thank you. :yesnod:

I need to emphasize that it very much depends on the materials made of the rotor. Any rotor could explode under the thermal stresses created at a certain temperature. It'd even happen on the brake disks of a Formula one racing car once they have reached a temperature of approximately 400 degrees. Note that the brake disks are already reinforced with carbon fibre. So we can imagine how high the heat created in a racing car.

Instead of drilling or slotting the rotor, Ferrari conceived an original way of dealing with the heat problem in brakes. The brake-duct, conducting the slipstream wind along the brake disks, is equipped with a kind of turbo. This is a rotor mounted on the wheel shaft, providing additional suction to get even more air into the brake-duct. Thanks to the rotor, the brake-duct can be made smaller, benefiting the aerodynamics and of course lighter. The other F1 teams have now copied the idea.

Without the help of brake-duct and carbon reinforcement, I don't see decreasing the mass of a rotor with drilling/slotting is a good idea. Yes, it'd help to cool down the heat created under heavy braking but the downside is that, decreasing surface area of contact would also result in decreasing the work done by friction and there's a larger chance that cracking would develop along the slotted or drilled area for a pretty obvious reason. Personally, I'd pick heat treated directional vane rotors over slotted/drilled rotor anytime.

Just my $0.2
 

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drilled CAN crack but it is unusual and thats under extreme temperature changes. slotted however, have a less chance. ALL rotors no matter what texture CAN crack. upgrading your brakes to slotted or drilled is a great buy for any performance car
 

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If you are running on a track, then go with the drilled. If you are just daily driving, stick with stock. There isn't that much difference in stopping unless the temp is at race levels.
 
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