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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im up to about 50K on my 2004 6s and i think its about time to get some new brakes. Looking into the Hawk Ceramics for the front and back.

Is it recomended that i replace my rotors or just get them machined? Who machines rotors? how can i check if they need to be replaced? How do you turn your rotors?

...also does anyone have experience with Rotora H2 cemamic pads and Rotora rotors? Do they make a reputable slotted (not drilled and slotted) Rotor for the 6?
 

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i'd bring it to a shop to see if they know what the minimum spec for our rotors are. if you have a digital caliper or somthing, you can measure the thickness at different points.

when switching pads, it is advised to sand the rotors to remove the material left behind by the original pads. if you are not getting a vibration in the brake pedal when braking, the rotors do not need to be turned on a lathe.


when the rotors are within spec, then sanded, you must bed-in the brakes to allow the brakes to work correctly. bed in procedures can usually be located on the manufacturer's website.
 

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Along with what arch said, you only need to replace the rotors if they need replacing. Just switiching pads isn't cause for replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ok so when someone says "resurfacing" they mean with sandpaper. gotcha...

the reason i believe that i need new rotors is because i am getting vibration while braking lately. i feel they might be warped or maybe my wheels arent balanced.

should i bring this up when i get an oil change next week? my mazda service dept can address the depth of the rotors right?

thanks for the help.
 

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ok so when someone says "resurfacing" they mean with sandpaper. gotcha...

the reason i believe that i need new rotors is because i am getting vibration while braking lately. i feel they might be warped or maybe my wheels arent balanced.

should i bring this up when i get an oil change next week? my mazda service dept can address the depth of the rotors right?

thanks for the help.
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If you trust them to give you an honest answer about them, instead of trying to sell you new ones, then sure, I'd have them checked. They can also re-balance your wheels if needed as well...
 

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If your getting new pads get new rotors, its silly not too.... why would you put new pads onto old rotors especially when your new pads have a higher friction compound? Now your putting MORE heat into a rotor that has already lost some of it's mass?

If your going for performance pads, get new blanks at a minimum, its silly to put a high friction pad on a worn rotor, it is only asking for overheating when drivne hard, and warping due to un nessecary heat build up. Heck rotors every 50K miles is pretty good IMO!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
which ones should i get then? i have read the cautions against drilled/slotted, so are OEMs the preferred replacement?

also, is it the consensus to get Hawk pads from a sponsor?
 

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which ones should i get then? i have read the cautions against drilled/slotted, so are OEMs the preferred replacement?
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IIRC, slotted are okay, but cross-drilled... :nono:
 

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Slotted are perfectly safe form cracking and warping. While the slots to not provide out gassing like they used to many moons ago, they do keep a fresh pad surface and IMO look pretty good. You may see slightly shorter pad life with slotted rotors, but overall braking should be identical. Any loss of mass is negated by better cooling.

That being said, a quality blank i perfectly acceptable, I get slotted personally because A: THey aren ormally zinc plated and I hate rusty rotors, B: They look neat-o!
 

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im keeping my stock rotors when i swap pads here in a week, ive got 24k miles.
 

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I just brought my 04 6s back to Premier Mazda in Georgetown, TX for warranty work. They did a test drive to check out the car and noticed the front rotors were warped, which I knew. They replaced them under warranty. The car is 1.5 yrs old and I have 16K miles. Sweet! The service guy said they have a newer rotor design they are using which should last longer. If anyone want the Mazda p/n for it, I'll get it.
 

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which ones should i get then? i have read the cautions against drilled/slotted, so are OEMs the preferred replacement?

also, is it the consensus to get Hawk pads from a sponsor?
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As I stated in another thread, I am asking the same questions, performing the same research. There are several high-end rotor vendors who make invidious comparisons between their high quality materials and workmanship and cheap Asian-sourced rotors. (See, e.g., the PowerSlot site.) Of course, they do not identify the competition that use the cheap Asian-sourced blanks. :(

Although I am leaning in the direction of DBA rotors, one American vendor, Raybestos, which has to do well in friction materials because that is its entire business, makes a big deal of making vehicle-specific rotors instead of one generic rotor that then is machined to fit multiple vehicles. Apparently, the ventilating vanes between the disks of Mazdas differ from those of some other manufacturers, and the rotors that Raybestos makes and sells for Mazda applications match the Mazda vane design. I am impressed by that attention to detail. Bonus: the Raybestos rotors for the Mazda6 are inexpensive. Because it is not a site sponsor, I will not post here the URL of the place I found them, but the retailer has a name a lot like Auto Parts Warehouse. <_<

As for the comment that slotted rotors keep pads clean, doesn't that mean, IOW, that slotted rotors wear pads out faster? :?:

As to pads, I, too, am leaning toward Hawks (the Performance Ceramics), but I would like to know more about people's experience with PBR Ultimate/Axxis Ultimate pads, which are made by Bendix-Mintex in Australia. Anybody here use them?
 

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i dont believe axxis ultimate is available for the mazda 6.


if you want brake pads, i'd say stick with the HPS or HP+.

if you want race, go hawk blues( if you want to rip through rotors) or hawk ht-10
 

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You probably don't have to replace them, but i decided to. I hate warped rotors more than anything, and every time in the past that I've had rotors machined, they warped again before too long. I'm down to the end of my stock pads, and I decided to do the whole thing at once. New Hawk pads and Rotora blank rotors all the way around from therpmstore.com. I'll review 'em once I ge them in and on.
 

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As for the comment that slotted rotors keep pads clean, doesn't that mean, IOW, that slotted rotors wear pads out faster? 14.gif
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As I stated blatantly:
You may see slightly shorter pad life with slotted rotors
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But if your buying aftermarket high friction pads, I have to assume your driving hard SOME TIME, what good are glazed pads that last 15 years :huh:

It's a matter of matching quality components, putting new high friction pads on used rotors is like putting P165/85/13's on a ferrari or wrinkle walls on a 71 honda civic ATX or 87 octane in an F1 car or a.... if your going to use one quality component, match it with something else quality!

This is JUST my opinion, I am by no means an automotive or brake god, but I have built 2 big brake kits, I used slotted rotors in both, to date no one has complained of un due or premature pad wear.
 

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i dont believe axxis ultimate is available for the mazda 6.
if you want brake pads, i'd say stick with the HPS or HP+.

if you want race, go hawk blues( if you want to rip through rotors) or hawk ht-10
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According to the manufacturer, PBR Ultimate and Axxis Ultimate are identical. (Information from Mazda Protege Forum.) PBR Ultimate front pads for the Mazda6 are advertised for sale from a site that is not a sponsor, so I will not post a link, but the business name is Auto Parts Warehouse. The PBR Ultimate is not a low dust pad, but is said to yield slightly lower dust than the OEM Mazda pad.

I have no intention to race or autocross my Mazda6, but I do drive very early in the morning on wet streets and roads when the temperatures are in the 40s and 50s (F.) perhaps 75 to 100 days a year, so among the Hawk products, the Performance Ceramic pads are more suited to me than the HPS and HP+ which are more high temperature oriented and less suited to the cold and damp.
 

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Some answers....since I didn't see any explicitly answering the question:

You do not have to replace the rotors when you get new pads.

If you are going to a high performance pad, check the manufacturers site. If you HAVE to either turn or go new on the rotors, they will tell you so. I can tell you from experiance that Hawk Blue pad material is NOT compatible with OEM type material. I didn't check before using. Fortunately, this was on an Audi and they replaced both front calipers which had melted the seals.

If you do bring the rotors to be turned, the machinist (machine shops tend to be cheaper than auto parts shops....and know what they're doing) will tell you without even looking it up....what the min thickness is. It's stamped on the rotor.

Always use solid, non slotted, non drilled rotors. They're the most effective, cheapest and least prone to problems. On the track, they're a must.

jack
 

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hawk hps by no means is a high temperature pad. the HP+ is the only semi crossover pad, but its operating temps are just fine for daily driving.


hawk blues are such an old pad material, they are basically made of iron. they rip through any rotor you put them on. they outlast the rotors generally. they also are a track only pad, not to be driven on the street.
 

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Jason:

Bob Penkhus Mazda on Woodmen has always given me the straight shit on my brakes. Talk to Matt -- he knows what he's doing. I don't like the other service advisors as much. But he'll set you straight.

Personally, I had my brakes done under the TSB at 25K miles. At 67K, I'm just starting to get squeaking, so I'm gonna be due soon. I'm going with Hawks and OEM rotors, I think....
 

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Personally, I had my brakes done under the TSB at 25K miles. At 67K, I'm just starting to get squeaking, so I'm gonna be due soon. I'm going with Hawks and OEM rotors, I think....
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I have spent way too much time recently researching what kind of rotors and pads to take with me to my mechanic. (My rotors would not have enough iron left after another turning, and the current pads have only a few hundred miles worth of wear on them. I do not trust myself to do the replacement myself and get it right, and if I leave it to my mechanic to get the parts from his sources, I end up paying two mark-ups on top of one another.)

I have found some interesting discussions on other enthusiast boards, and not necessarily the ones I would have expected. I mentioned the Mazda Protege board in an earlier post in this thread; at this miata.net site is an intersting collection of actual user reviews. There is some solid advice in a post by Rob Levinson on the (BMW) E46fanatics site, and some pretty authoritative stuff in several separate and increasingly interesting posts by a tech person who works for FMP Group (the Bendix subsidiary in Australia, makers of PBR and Axxis brand brake pads) , whose screen name is Tedium, in a very long and informative thread (seven "pages") in the TurboBricks forum (for people who race old square Volvo sedans). "Tedium" could benefit from some political correctness sensitivity, but I had not, before reading that thread, known the difference between Japanese-style ceramic pad formulations and European-style formulations. (I had wondered why Akebono, which spends a lot of money on R&D, found it necessary to have a Euro-specific ceramic pad formulation; now I know.)

Having read all this (and a lot more), I find myself no longer leaning toward getting DBA rotors and Hawk Performance Ceramic pads. Now I am leaning toward getting PBR Ultimate pads, which are a European-style low metal ceramic formulation, and -- apparently -- are not "rotor friendly." But because the pads are more important than the rotor in bringing a vehicle to a stop, it now seems to me to make more sense to get inexpensive rotors (as long as they are well balanced and do not skimp on the quantity or configuration of ventilating vanes/pillars) such as the Raybestos PG Plus ($98 a pair), and let the ($87) PBR Ultimate pads chew them up, than to spend much more on expensive rotors like the DBA ($229 a pair, plus $25 shipping) that I would want to pamper with "rotor friendly" pads like the Hawk Performance Ceramic ($70) or the Akebono ProACT.

Comments, anyone?
 
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