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Hmm, I just noticed the SuperBlue by ATE comes in 1 liter bottle. Question is should I get 2 bottle in case my mechanic runs out and I guess I could use to top off if ever low...or just buy the one 1 liter bottle?
 

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Lowspeed
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Honestly, better to ask the mechanic, but I've done my speed twice (including clutch), my wife's santa fe & my A4 and never needed more than 1 liter.

The blue helps cause you can tell easily when it's flushed at each corner, especially if using a clear tube...


 

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I can see how the blue would make it easier to do the job correctly! I think I'm going to go with a liter. Worse case scenario I could add some regular DOT 4 to top off if needed, I'm sure it wouldn't affect anything negatively.
 

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Curious, how would you tell once all the old fluid is drained if you weren't using the blue stuff? Most of the bottled brake fluid in auto stores is the same color as what's in most if not all stock vehicles, a clear with a tint of amber fluid.
 

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It's a lot like telling used motor oil from new-

It's dirty & nasty, darker & not nearly as clear.


 

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Thanks for that pic, makes sense! Guess I'm used to looking in my master cylinder and it always looked pretty clean/clear. But I've never compared new to used as in the above pic, where it's pretty obvious lol.
 

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Tapping the caliper to get the AIR OUT!

FWIW: while pressure bleeding (not vacuum bleeding) another trick to add to your arsenal for a firm pedal is tapping the bottom of the caliper while the system is under pressure with block of wood or plastic faced hammer. This dislodges air trapped so it can make its way to the bleeder. Works best while under pressure.

Rubber mallets don't work, steel hammers can leave marks so hard nylon or a wood block works great. Also - don't strike the back of caliper inwards in the direction of piston travel, always strike/tap in a perpendicular fashion. Often times you'll see air come out from a few small taps. More so from parts replacement, than a maintenance bleed job - i.e. new hoses, new calipers, etc.
 

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It's a lot like telling used motor oil from new-

It's dirty & nasty, darker & not nearly as clear.


Looks more like a Flat Pale Ale vs water then brake fluid. lol The reservoir on the M6 is a odd shape and PITA the but sucking out the original fluid speeds this process along substantially! A 50 to 100 cc syringe and some silicone tubing work great; just route the hose to the bottom, pull back the plunger and WALLA! Empty in a few pulls. Now there is little to no mixing and its more obvious in the color change at the caliper.
 

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FWIW: while pressure bleeding (not vacuum bleeding) another trick to add to your arsenal for a firm pedal is tapping the bottom of the caliper while the system is under pressure with block of wood or plastic faced hammer. This dislodges air trapped so it can make its way to the bleeder. Works best while under pressure.

Rubber mallets don't work, steel hammers can leave marks so hard nylon or a wood block works great. Also - don't strike the back of caliper inwards in the direction of piston travel, always strike/tap in a perpendicular fashion. Often times you'll see air come out from a few small taps. More so from parts replacement, than a maintenance bleed job - i.e. new hoses, new calipers, etc.
I've never heard of this tip, but it makes sense. I'll try it next time I'm doing brakes. Thanks for sharing.
 

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I've never heard of this tip, but it makes sense. I'll try it next time I'm doing brakes. Thanks for sharing.
Some designs are better than others, but the cavities hold air, this helps get it out. Also as the complexity goes up, i.e. 3 pot calipers tend to have more opportunity to trap air.

Me personally I will not vacuum bleed a system unless I have no other choice. Its not as effective as pressure bleeding with a helper as you are litterally pulling the molecules away from each other and this has greater oppertunity for holding and retaining air then forcing them together under pressure.

If alone, do the vacuum thing and if possible touch all 4 corners under pressure with a helper as the finally effort before calling it Job done! JM2Cents.. .. ..
 

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FWIW: while pressure bleeding (not vacuum bleeding) another trick to add to your arsenal for a firm pedal is tapping the bottom of the caliper while the system is under pressure with block of wood or plastic faced hammer. This dislodges air trapped so it can make its way to the bleeder. Works best while under pressure.

Rubber mallets don't work, steel hammers can leave marks so hard nylon or a wood block works great. Also - don't strike the back of caliper inwards in the direction of piston travel, always strike/tap in a perpendicular fashion. Often times you'll see air come out from a few small taps. More so from parts replacement, than a maintenance bleed job - i.e. new hoses, new calipers, etc.
I actually did this a couple weeks ago during my bleed and I know for a fact that it helped. Good call!
 

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It's never taken me more than a liter, but not everybody is so lucky
With 4 it's possible one bottle won't even be opened, but sure is a PITA to run out 99% of the way through, just ask @IHeartGroceries;
**grumble grumble**
:swearin::slap::loser::cursing::irate:
 

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Why would you avoid this? The fluid attracts moisture and breaks down over time. Removing the moisture and sediment from the system will greatly extend the life of the components and make a positive peddle. It should be done every two years or during pad changes as you have to press the pucks back in anyway and its a bad idea to force all the crap back into the master cylinder.

Interesting; a guy joins one day (07-07-2013), Gives me a GROAN, has ZERO POSTS SINCE joining and nothing to add. :huh: lol

The Following User Says NO Thank You to Final Impact For This Un-useful Post: Nascar17 (07-07-2013) http://forum.mazda6club.com/engine-suspension-drivetrain/224563-diy-mazdaspeed6-replace-pads-rotors-3.html#post3484298

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OK as you were! Thread needed a bump anyway!
 

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I've got an '06 Speed, and bought the ever-popular Centric Premium rotors and pads from Rock Auto.... don't forget to order TWO(2) rotors.

CENTRIC 10411860 (104.11860) Brake Pad $ 24.79
CENTRIC 12545073 (125.45073) Rotor $ 119.58
Shipping Ground $ 20.15
Order Total $ 164.52

I'll throw in my 2 cents having read this entire thread before attempting. If you read the whole thing, you'll have no problem with any of the gotchas. I only have 2 pieces of advice.

Rotor screws... tried impact driver with a 3lb sledge for about 10 hits on each screw after soaking in WD40 for about 10 minutes. Not a single screw budged. Then I broke out the drill and all were out in less than a minute each. You're not going to re-use these things, so if it takes more than about 10 seconds with an impact driver, you're wasting more time vice just drilling them. TIP: the screws themselves are pretty soft... USE A SHARP BIT and don't pull the trigger on the drill all the way... about 1/3 speed or slower will eat that screw up. When I got the rotors off, there was enough shaft of the screw sticking out that I could grab it and unscrew the rest of the way by hand... all but 1. 30 seconds with an easy-out and it was toast. TIP: JUST DRILL THEM... USE A SHARP BIT AND THEY'RE THROUGH IN SECONDS.

7mm HEX for caliper pins... I had 6 different and various sets of hex/allen stuff... not a single one had a 7mm. All went up to 6mm, and then either straight to 10mm, or just went straight to 8mm. Totally random discovery on my part. TIP: BEFORE STARTING, MAKE SURE YOU ACTUALLY HAVE A 7mm HEX/ALLEN.

After 20 miles of mixed hwy/city, the initial bite is a bit less than factory, and the modulation is much more controllable... overall they "softer" but not in a bad way. This car is a 100% commuter vehicle and I have no complaints with the new brakes. I'll be back in 500 miles to report if anything changes.
 

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Trying to decided if I should just go with OEMs or ? Canot afford new brembo rotors so swithing back to OEM calipers.
So the centric rotors are the same price as OEMs. Rockauto says high carbon. Not sure if they are better or same as OEMs.
OEM pads are $100.
If the centrics are sofer I think I would prefer OEMs.

I got rear rotors from advanced for $25/each and rear ceramic pads.
May return pads and get OEMs or something IDK.
 

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This is a GREAT thread. Thanks for posting this Matt.
I attempted to replace my rotors and pads yesterday with little success. This is my first time doing this.

I got the wheel and the caliper off and just hung it while I tried to get the rotor off. I didn't budge. I beat on it and around it with a rubber mallet for 10 minutes. She didn't budge but a lot of rust broke free. I got frustrated and cleaned everything up with brake cleaner and put it all back together. My 6 has 208k miles and I want it to last as long as possible. I would hate to break something. She's my daily driver and I need her to get to work.

Guess I'll call the mechanic tomorrow. I've always had the mechanic do all repairs. I just thought I'd try and save some $ and try to do this myself. I guess it's above my ability. :frown2:
 
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