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Another 6tech article that many might find useful, picturs are using a V6, but the same rules apply to the 2.3 cars as well.


The MAF and IAT (Intake Air Temp) sensors sit in the incoming air stream, translating airflow into little 0's and 1's the PCM can use to figure out the amount of necessary fuel to add for proper combustion. Over time these sensors can accumulate dirt, as no air filter stops 100% of incoming silicon particles. When this happens, the car can manifest problems like erratic idle, throttle hesitation, or a general lack of responsiveness.
How-To Clean Your Mass Air Flow Sensor


Symptom:
Erratic Idle
Throttle Hesitation
Muggy Feel (car doesn't respond like it used to)


Reason:
The MAF and IAT (Intake Air Temp) sensors sit in the incoming air stream, translating airflow into little 0's and 1's the PCM can use to figure out the amount of necessary fuel to add for proper combustion. Over time these sensors can accumulate dirt, as no air filter stops 100% of incoming silicon particles. Owners with K&N style cotton gauze (oil) air filters will find their particular sensors get dirtier faster then those running paper filters, both as a result of less filtering efficency, and the oil base the filters use to trap dirt.

As the dirt piles up, the ability of the sensors to read the incoming airstream decreases and becomes erratic. Too much buildup of dirt, and a loss of power will occur due to the car's inability to maintain a proper air/fuel for maximum power/efficency.

Tools/Parts Required
Phillips Screwdriver (If non CP-E intake)
Can of Electrical Cleaner
10mm Socket Wrench
Star socket (if you have a CP-E intake)


Step 1: Pick up the required tools. Here is an example of a type of electrical cleaner in a spray bottle. Make sure you get a red extender nozzle as well.




Step 2: Disconnect the Negative Battery Terminal. This requires use of the 10mm socket/wrench (This helps protect against accidentally shorting out the sensors, as well as protecting your hands from the fan of death)




Step 3: Identify the MAF location. It will be either on a stock airbox in the lower right of the engine bay (when facing the car), or in the center of a big metal pipe (if you have a CAI). If you've got all sorts of piping with a turbo involved and intercooler and such, well damn you for having a better car then me. In the first snapshot, the blue circle points out the negative battery terminal you should have removed, while the red circle points out the maf location on the stock airbox. The second image shows the maf sitting in the middle of a general long metal pipe, also known as aftermarket glee.





Haha MAF! No where to hide now! I got you!

Step 4: Remove the MAF Plug, then remove the MAF itself. The maf is held in by two phillips screws on most intakes/airboxes/cars, and two hexagonal/star bolts on the CP-E intake. Here are some redunant photos for anyone who is lost.






Step 5: Inspect the MAF/IAT and figure out what your doing.

Here is a photo of the MAF/IAT assembly. The teardrop on the right is NOT the MAF...thats the IAT (Intake Air Temp) Sensor. The actual MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor bits are inside the plastic cylinder, hiding (ninja mode).


The little teardrop IAT sensor should be dark amber in color (as photo'd below). If its black on one side, or relatively dirty, this is a good sign that both sensors need to be cleaned. If you can't tell that the IAT sensor was ever amber...then shame on you for not caring about your intake sensor system.



As mentioned, above is the IAT sensor, NOT the MAF sensor. To access the actual MAF resistors/sensors, you'll need to flip the assembly upside down, and peek up the skirt. Down one side of the tube you'll see two tiny wires. These are quite hidden and far up there for a reason. They are deadly ninja resistors, and any contact with them will instantly result in them flipping out and killing you. And if they don't flip out and kill you directly, they'll attack your bank account and subtract about 125 USD for a new MAF assembly. Summary? Don't poke the wires!!!




Step 6: Clean the IAT and MAF sensors using the purchased spray bottle of electrical cleaner. Excessive spray on the rubber O-ring around the MAF assembly may cause it to become brittle, so you may feel the need to remove it, or at least cover it up with some tape/cardboard/titanium shield prior to blasting the hell outta the sensors. And when I say "blast the hell out of", I mean douse the sensors with cleaner. Spray, then spray again, wait for it to dry, spray again. A good 3-4 blasts should do the trick. Remember not to physically touch either of the two wires with the extender nozzle. DO NOT TOUCH THE WIRES!!! Just spray a distance away from them.




Allow everything to dry completely, then put everything back together and reassemble. The last step will be reattaching the negative battery terminal, then starting the car, realizing all your radio stations were reset.

There is some level of danger to this activity, as touching the wires can damage the maf, basically destroying it. So be forewarned!
 

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Good find......

There was a wealth of knowledge on 6 tech.
 

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yeah, i'm going through it right now and redoing what i can. though i don't know how long the links will work for pics, but i'll work on that later as well.
 

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good shit tea.


i remember 6tech. although my 6 journey started towards the tail end of 6tech going down.

good to see things are still being pulled from there.
 

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i don't have any experience with it, but i would never recommend a brake cleaner for any electrical components. it can be pretty harsh, and it's not worth the risk. though you might not have access to teh exact stuff listed in here, just looke for an electrical cleaner and you will be fine.
 

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typically you won't need to, you can spray them a bit and let that loosen any tough stuff up, then come back and hit it again after a couple minutes.

...then you just "let the sons of bitches dry" :yesnod:
 
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did this last week when i finally got my SRI/inlet pipe. I cant see the MAF wires too well but the IAT sensor was dir-tay so i would only assume the MAF needed a cleaning too. Thanks to MrTea's write up they both sparkle in the sunlight lol Thanks for the write up, I would not have sprayed the hell out of the maf sensor without your advice
 

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I did this last week and blasted all the sensors for like 30 mins. I'm sorry to say that I don't feel an extensive difference at all when comparing before the senors were cleaned to after.. <_<


The task was easy though.
 

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I did this last week and blasted all the sensors for like 30 mins. I'm sorry to say that I don't feel an extensive difference at all when comparing before the senors were cleaned to after.. <_<


The task was easy though.
It's not supposed to be a night/day difference. So are we to assume our engines would fire off like a rocket right after an oil change?

Now if you had problems with a dirty maf, then it would be night and day. Pair that up with a dirty TB then you have a difference you can feel when its dirty vs when it is clean.
 

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Yes but it's quite easy. But you will need TB cleaner and don't use the MAF cleaner, from my understanding, the TB cleaner has lubricants and the MAF cleaners do not.

Just wait until the car is cooled down (at least an hour), grab two disposable cups to catch some coolant, and some rags. FIRST AND FOREMOST, disconnect the neg battery line!! Then remove the connector from the TB by pulling the red tab up and then slowly pull the harness off, then remove the accordion tube from your airbox/sri/cai. Use needle nose pliers to remove the coolant line from the top of the TB, use a cup to catch any coolant if it leaks out. Then remove the 4 bolts from the TB then slowly pull the freed TB up. You will find the second coolant line beneath. Do the same with that hose. Now you can go ahead and clean the TB with TB cleaner. Use a cap from a water bottle to hold the TB plate open, then liberally spray the TB cleaner on both sides of the plate. Let dry and be careful, TB cleaners are flammable!
 

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I recommend taking out the TB completely and using a can of TB cleaner, a toothbrush, and some q-tips and cleaning the TB thoroughly........it's honestly astounding how much carbon gets built up inside that thing. In my experience just spraying w/ TB cleaner won't remove all of the carbon.
 

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For MAF/IAT cleaning, best not to use ELECTRICAL cleaner. Use ELECTRONIC cleaner. The latter is safe on plastics.

I used CRC brand too. They also make MAF cleaner which formula is almost chemically identical to electronic cleaner, one just dries a little bit faster. The electrical formula is not the same and can crack or weaken certain plastics.
 

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I'm new to the Mazda6club.com site, however I did see MrTea's DIY on cleaning of the MAF sensor and IAT sensor. Excellent!!!!

I also have 3 CEL codes: P0304, P0443, P0442. I am particularly concerned about the P0443. Uhh What??? That's a new one. Please let me know if there is a DIY'er for that code.
 
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