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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Al right folks this is a very basic DIY. How to change your pads and rotors on 2014+ Mazda6. Full disclaimer: I am not a mechanic and not responsible for you breaking anything including yourself. Ok let's proceed.

Tools you'll need:

Common Sense
PB Blaster
14mm and 17mm sockets and wrenches
C-clamp or other device to reset the caliper
brake pads and rotors.

Use PB blaster on the Caliper Bracket bolts the night before if you plan to replace rotors. Do not drive after you've applied the PB blaster as some will get on the rotor you will be replacing. Once you have installed the new rotor you'll be good.

Start by jacking your car up and removing the wheels. Be sure to support the car correctly. (As suggested by Nihilus: correct support of your vehicle includes using jackstands to support the vehicle as well as chocks to keep it from rolling...be smart about this!)

Tire off and car in the air:



Open up the brake fluid cap and set aside, you may want to put some towels down around the reservoir:



Next we're going to remove the following bolts:

  • If you're only doing pads remove the bolts with the red dots (14mm)
  • If you're doing rotors as well loosen the bolts with the green dots (17mm) after you've removed the caliper


Once the caliper is off rest it on something as you do not want to strain the brake line which is connected:



Now you're going to re-expand you brakes, I use a c-clamp and the prior pad. Put the old pad against the cylinder and use the c-clamp to reset brake piston:



If you're doing pads you install the new pads and hardware and put everything back together. It's the same process on the other side. Once you have replaced the pads on both sides put the brake fluid cap back on. The brakes will be quite spongy at first so pump a couple of times prior to moving. Then bed your brakes as called for by your manufacturer.

If you're replacing you rotors as well continue below:

Remove the caliper bracket:



Pic of everything minus the rotor removed (notice no screw holding the rotor in place as in other cars) to get the rotor off just pull it towards you:



Everything removed just the hub:



Now slide the rotor back on and begin bolting the caliper bracket back on (17mm):



Install new pads w/ hardware:



Now install caliper (14mm) and tighten everything up:



Put your wheel back on and rinse and repeat on the other side.
Once you have replaced the pads and rotors on both sides put the brake fluid cap back on. The brakes will be quite spongy at first so pump a couple of times prior to moving. Then bed your brakes as called for by your manufacturer.

Hope this helps someone out!
 

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OP, you're going to have to fix the links to the photos in order to embed them into your post.


You have to use the physical link to the photo, like this one

 

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Sorry about that hope I fixed it. Let me know if it's not showing up.
You're good to go!

Also, I know you said to support the car correctly, but perhaps include that people should definitely use jack stands to hold the car in air... I've seen some shoddy practices used by some folks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You're good to go!

Also, I know you said to support the car correctly, but perhaps include that people should definitely use jack stands to hold the car in air... I've seen some shoddy practices used by some folks.
good point, done.
 

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@Mazderati, did you have to remove the under body plastic cover to jack it up? ...and under which part exactly did you place the jack so it is strong enough to take the car weight? I have not jacked up this car yet and better get the info before I do it. Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I jacked it up one side at a time a and then used jack stands with a pinch weld adapter. No underside panels were removed, I jacked it up at the point where the crossmember meets the body.
 

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The front is not a problem; the LCA bushing mount brackets are very heavy cast iron and will take a stand on a solid and stable basis. Jack using a puck at the pinch weld point (or the center pad on the subframe which is a designated factory jacking point and designed for lifting the front end) and support on the LCA chassis mount points (rear of the LCAs.)

The rear, however, presents a problem on this car in terms of where you can safely place stands. Again the factory-designed doubled point on the pinch welds, with a puck, works fine for jacking but then where do the stands go? I've not yet found a place I consider safe for the rear but will obviously have to when the time comes for a brake job. The usual advice on an independent suspension car is to place stands on the bottom of the spring perches with a board across them to distribute the load (provided you are ok with the suspension being loaded while you do your work, which is fine for brakes) as this is the same way the load is taken on those perches when the car is sitting on the ground but that presents a problem in that this point is too low for a stand to fit under it when the car is lifted with a jack.

I suspect what I need are a pair of low-profile stands specifically for this purpose.
 

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The problem is that you need two points on each side -- one to jack and the second to place the stand. The only safe place to jack on the rail is where it's doubled; that's the point where it was designed to take a jacking load for tire changes but it's not wide enough to BOTH jack and place a stand there. Never mind that the weld will not take any sort of material sideways load without damage.

I use what amounts to a hockey puck with a slot in it for jacking, which distributes the load nicely and works fine. I've never damaged a pinch weld doing that. But you don't want to place jackstands on the pinch welds -- you need strongpoints on the structure of the vehicle for that.

If you're lifting symmetrically with a 4-post lift or similar then it's a different matter as there is no sideload and the jack points, properly padded on both sides (e.g. hockey puck style load spreaders) are ok. But most of us don't have a 4-post lift....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah I saw that practically the same area just the other side of the car. It looks like the pinch weld area is relatively wide as well so you could conceivably slide a jack stand right next to your jack and move to the other side.
 

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I jacked it up under the bushing shown in the picture (red arrow) and put the jack stand under the pinch weld.
If anyone thinks that was not a good spot to jack up please let me know.
 

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Thanks for this tutorial, I am planning on doing the same to my car soon to fix front break shaking. I didn't see you mention bleeding the breaks anywhere. I read in a different post for the 2nd gen 6s that you should bleed the brakes when replacing rotors. Is that not required on the 3rd gen?
 

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I would suggest that you not remove the cap to the brake fluid reservoir and instead
open the bleed valve on the caliper when resetting it. Since this is a 2014, your brake fluid is probably not too dirty an pushing it back into the system is OK. But if your fluid is getting dirty / burnt, you want to get it out of the system and replace the new fluid. Plus, it's a lot cleaner.

Good article though
 

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I jacked it up under the bushing shown in the picture (red arrow) and put the jack stand under the pinch weld.
If anyone thinks that was not a good spot to jack up please let me know.
I do the opposite, but it depends on what your jack and stands are shaped like I guess.

Like tickerguy says, the back is the problem if you need to unload the suspension.
 
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