Mazda 6 Forums banner

21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,947 Posts
I think the PIDs for ATX fluid temps are available on the OBD port (in other words, Torque can read them.)

Assuming so (I have an MTX) check 'em. If you're under 200F in your actual use, ignore it. If over, consider, if you can hook it up, an auxiliary cooler.

Is it as important as it used to be with fully-synthetic ATX fluids? No. But are high temperatures still bad? Yep.
 
Joined
·
484 Posts
I think the PIDs for ATX fluid temps are available on the OBD port (in other words, Torque can read them.)

Assuming so (I have an MTX) check 'em. If you're under 200F in your actual use, ignore it. If over, consider, if you can hook it up, an auxiliary cooler.

Is it as important as it used to be with fully-synthetic ATX fluids? No. But are high temperatures still bad? Yep.
Well, i'm sure high temperatures in an ATX (or heavy load/severe usage cycle situation) can be mitigated by using thicker ATF fluid as necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
can't think of which is worse: Maine in the Winter and Spring or St. George, Utah in the Summer.)
I'll take Maine winters 8 days a week over desert heat. You couldn't pay me to move out west!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,876 Posts
I'll take Maine winters 8 days a week over desert heat. You couldn't pay me to move out west!
AMEN. We've already had over 2ft of snow where I am and I love every second of it.


Sorry OP - we've kind of gotten off topic. Feel free to reign it in if you want, or continue the chatter - either is fine by me :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
ATF temp is available in the data stream at the OBD port. I monitor it with a ScanGauge on my 2015. ATF temps have typically been in the 190s (Fahrenheit) during the late summer and fall going down the highway in traffic. Over 200F is not unusual, though. Higher-viscosity fluid would be expected to run even hotter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
782 Posts
While the current ATX has an internal cooler, from looking at the parts and the descriptions; it appears that this mounts an oil-to-water heat exchanger on the transaxle assembly and the hoses are for coolant.
In order to be able to fit a conventional atf cooler, a custom-made aluminum plate would have to be fabricated - and it would go between the existing heat exchanger and the case of the automatic transmission. Longer bolts would be necessary, and a number of O Rings would be necessary. I think said plate would have to be 1-1/4" to 1-1/2" thick. See the attached graphics. I note that two of the graphics relate to a plate that a transmission flush equipment Company fabricated - to be able to run their flushing machine on the Mazda A/T... the flushing of which I thoroughly oppose and many manufacturers oppose. My purpose of including said graphics is to show the captured O-Ring arrangement that would be necessary on the faces of the aluminum plate.

BTW, you arrange the auxiliary, air-to-ATF cooler AFTER the OEM coolant-to-ATF cooler - in terms of the "flow diagram" (because the latter ALSO acts as an ATF heater in cold weather. The most elegant arrangements would have valving on the aux. ATF cooler to block and bypass it (and vent it to atmosphere) for 1 of the 4 seasons... i.e. wintertime. Also, the best set-ups would take the ATF temp, and with some allowance for "deadband" - on, versus off temp values - would take additional "control" of one or both cooling fans - and would turn 'em on to allow only a maximum, say, of 185F ATF temp, and would cycle off say at 175F.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Glad you posted that, Cdn. I had just been out looking at the heat exchanger on my ‘15, but your post and pics are much better than anything I could capture.
 
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top