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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed when I floor it it takes a second to actually respond to that and start to rev up... is there anything I can do about it I heard grounding the throttle body but not much else?? Help please
 

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Yeah thats the drive by wire electronic TB. Here is a good article /promo explaining the drive by wire system. There are throttle controllers on the market that allow one to adjust the amount of voltage the sensors see. I don't have anything like that or have even looked into it for our 6 but there might be one out there for it.
 

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I noticed when I floor it it takes a second to actually respond to that and start to rev up... is there anything I can do about it I heard grounding the throttle body but not much else?? Help please
What @DJ Raydiate said is accurate. There are aftermarket controllers that modify the signal sent to the throttle body. For me it is alittle beyone my trust level to give my throttle function to an aftermarket add-on. A manufacturer that may work for you is PedalBox

There is also a delay imposed by the rotational mass. Greater inertia makes it less likely to stall when engaging the clutch. This also slows REV response. The delay can be remedied with a lighter flywheel but it makes it more likely to stall when starting if you don't get it right. This point is largely moot with an automatic.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I noticed when I floor it it takes a second to actually respond to that and start to rev up... is there anything I can do about it I heard grounding the throttle body but not much else?? Help please
What @DJ Raydiate said is accurate. There are aftermarket controllers that modify the signal sent to the throttle body. For me it is alittle beyone my trust level to give my throttle function to an aftermarket add-on. A manufacturer that may work for you is PedalBox

There is also a delay imposed by the rotational mass. Greater inertia makes it less likely to stall when engaging the clutch. This also slows REV response. The delay can be remedied with a lighter flywheel but it makes it more likely to stall when starting if you don't get it right. This point is largely moot with an automatic.
Good luck.

Unfortunately they don’t have my engine on there which sucks but I appreciate the help guys I’m just trying to find a way to get better respond because getting to 5k rpm in first gear from flooring it it takes a while but after that it’s not bad but any other time highway speeds to floor it it’s too much delay to get going I can suck it up but if there’s something I can do about it I’m open to options
 

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Unfortunately they don’t have my engine on there which sucks but I appreciate the help guys I’m just trying to find a way to get better respond because getting to 5k rpm in first gear from flooring it it takes a while but after that it’s not bad but any other time highway speeds to floor it it’s too much delay to get going I can suck it up but if there’s something I can do about it I’m open to options
I am wondering if you have another issue. Are you running a V6?
Mine just explodes through 1st gear. I have often thought it was too short with the 5speed ATX. A clogged exhaust will also prevent revving. Did you have any misfire codes at one point? P0300?
If you had a video (with audio) showing what you mean it would he me out for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Unfortunately they don’t have my engine on there which sucks but I appreciate the help guys I’m just trying to find a way to get better respond because getting to 5k rpm in first gear from flooring it it takes a while but after that it’s not bad but any other time highway speeds to floor it it’s too much delay to get going I can suck it up but if there’s something I can do about it I’m open to options
I am wondering if you have another issue. Are you running a V6?
Mine just explodes through 1st gear. I have often thought it was too short with the 5speed ATX. A clogged exhaust will also prevent revving. Did you have any misfire codes at one point? P0300?
If you had a video (with audio) showing what you mean it would he me out for sure.
It’s automatic... v6 and when I floor it from a complete stop it takes a second or two to get up there I had a misfire while flooring it when I first got it at 103k miles but that was it wasn’t a permanent misfire just a random one but don’t get my wrong rolling from maybe 15 mph 1st gear does blow through it but from the stop not so much.
I’m up to date with maintenance but this has always been a problem and the engine is taken care of .. this isn’t my first v6 Mazda 6 wagon either same issue with that one
I’ll get a video today to show you though
 

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Have a v6 its more then likely Mass air flow sensor. I know exactly the feeling your talking about. You push the gas and it almost like it pauses. Just clean that and the throttle body. If its not those things believe me by now they need a good cleaning. Of course this is assuming you checked you spark plugs are good condition.
 

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I do this every season just to keep everything happy. If you don't know they last time your TB was calibrated, it's a good chance that it's due. Now if this doesn't help, then you have underlying conditions as stated.

V6 Auto owners, Do this NOW! Lag, Hesitation, Abrupt shifts (FIXED)
Does your 6 suffer from:
Passing gear lag, takes it sweet time to drop a gear and accelerate
Abrupt downshift (skipping gears like 3->1, 4->2, 6->3)
Jerking off idle while rolling on and off the throttle i.e. traffic jams
Abrupt engagement under light throttle
Non-linear control of engine speed for minor throttle changes
I've owned my 6 for just about a year now and have a VERY SIMPLE CURE for these conditions. Reset the Throttle Curve! Original is here: http://forum.mazda6club.com/3-0l-v6/...fts-fixed.html

HOW TO RESET THROTTLE CURVE:
Drive car to warm engine and drive train
Stop car and leave transmission in Park (Manual trans, leave it in gear).
Turn Ignition Switch OFF
Let off throttle pedal completely
Turn Ignition Switch on to Run position BUT DO NOT START!!
Slowly, consistently and at the even rate, depress the throttle pedal completely to the floor. BE SMOOTH!!!
Once down completely, Slowly, consistently and at the same rate, RELEASE the throttle pedal completely from the floor.
Once at the top, remove your foot and turn the Ignition Key OFF!
Done!
- Repeat every 90 days or when you notice it not playing nice!!


As you all know the servo sounding noise under the hood when the key is turned off is the Throttle Body Calibrating itself for idle and partial throttle load. Over time, most of us NEVER use full throttle as much as we use idle and partial throttle. This is my theory but it seems as if the ECM looses track of the linear curve from idle to WOT and makes decisions based upon a non-linear curve. This simple process has corrected my car making it so much more pleasant to drive. Doing this every 3 months is now a MUST!!

I've done this to several TBW vehicles, Toyota, Nissan, Ford, and Mazda 3. It seems to help all of them. Give it a try and report back.


Results may vary but it works well on this combination: 2006, AJ 3.0 & AW6A-EL 6 Spd
THIS DOES NOT FIX; stumble, misfire, CEL Faults, poor tune.

TAG: Throttle By Wire, LAG, Abrupt engagement, being a Jerk!
 

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Didn't see how old your car is.
This usually is caused by the ECM/PCM getting incorrect data for air flow and fuel flow.

First check the simple things.
1. Check your air filter. Replace if necessary.
2. Check your fuel filter. In my 2015 6 it is accessed through a service hole cover under the back seat. Again, replace if necessary.
3. Clean your MAF (Mass Airflow Sensor). Use only MAF sensor cleaner. This leaves no residue as other cleaners can. Residue can mess up, if not ruin, the delicate wire used to measure airflow. Thank goodness Mazda uses plain Phillips head screws instead of the security Torx screws other manufacturers use. It makes it a lot easier.
4. Clean your throttle body. It's generally better to pull it off the intake to clean it, but with the throttle by wire system used in Mazdas, I prefer to leave it on and just wipe down the throat and front of the butterfly valve with a lint free cloth or paper towel soaked in throttle body cleaner. It keeps you from having to go through the relearn process. The throttle body is easily accessible by removing the air hose that runs from the air filter to the engine (That's the big hose that runs between those two components).
5. Check your air filter to engine air hose for cracks or tears. This will cause more air getting to your intake manifold than is measured by the MAF sensor. This will cause the ECM/PCM to not inject enough fuel causing a lean fuel mixture. Which will cause a hesitation under sudden loads. If this is the case, replace it.
6. Check your vacuum hoses for cracks and leaks. Best to use a smoke generator to do this. There are several good videos on YouTube that show how to construct an inexpensive smoke generator ($20 or less) and how to use it. But a visual inspection may suffice. If there is a leak, since everything is interconnected, it can throw the air/fuel mixture off. If you find a leak, replace the hose.
7. Connect an OBD-II scanner to the car's OBD-II port to check if the ECM/PCM is detecting an error code. If you do not have a scanner, most auto parts stores will do this for you for free. If you plan on maintaining your own vehicle, I would recommend getting one for yourself. Depending on sophistication, you can get one as cheap one around $25 to a couple of hundred dollars.
8. Clean you fuel injectors. At this point, you can be confident that the amount of air getting to your engine has been properly measured and the amount of combustible fuel is off (e.g. the fuel is not being properly atomized). I use Marvel Mystery Oil for this. I add 4 oz/10 gallons of fuel in the tank (i.e. 6 oz for my 16 gallon tank) every 3,000 miles. I've used MMO starting with my carburetor cars (Yes, I am that old) with excellent results and it is better than the crap they try to sell you at the auto parts store. If they are gummed up, it may take a couple of tanks to get them clean. But it is a lot cheaper than having a mechanic clean or replace them for you.

I don't know how much you are mechanically inclined and willing to open the hood and 'crawl around inside'. But since you posted this question here, I will assume that you are willing. I've tried to make this list starting at simplest to progressively more complicated and least likely.


The engineers at Mazda have, in my experience, created a very good car. This type of problem is probably due to wear and tear and you need to discover what is worn out or torn.
 

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Didn't see how old your car is.
This usually is caused by the ECM/PCM getting incorrect data for air flow and fuel flow.

First check the simple things.
1. Check your air filter. Replace if necessary.
2. Check your fuel filter. In my 2015 6 it is accessed through a service hole cover under the back seat. Again, replace if necessary.
3. Clean your MAF (Mass Airflow Sensor). Use only MAF sensor cleaner. This leaves no residue as other cleaners can. Residue can mess up, if not ruin, the delicate wire used to measure airflow. Thank goodness Mazda uses plain Phillips head screws instead of the security Torx screws other manufacturers use. It makes it a lot easier.
4. Clean your throttle body. It's generally better to pull it off the intake to clean it, but with the throttle by wire system used in Mazdas, I prefer to leave it on and just wipe down the throat and front of the butterfly valve with a lint free cloth or paper towel soaked in throttle body cleaner. It keeps you from having to go through the relearn process. The throttle body is easily accessible by removing the air hose that runs from the air filter to the engine (That's the big hose that runs between those two components).
5. Check your air filter to engine air hose for cracks or tears. This will cause more air getting to your intake manifold than is measured by the MAF sensor. This will cause the ECM/PCM to not inject enough fuel causing a lean fuel mixture. Which will cause a hesitation under sudden loads. If this is the case, replace it.
6. Check your vacuum hoses for cracks and leaks. Best to use a smoke generator to do this. There are several good videos on YouTube that show how to construct an inexpensive smoke generator ($20 or less) and how to use it. But a visual inspection may suffice. If there is a leak, since everything is interconnected, it can throw the air/fuel mixture off. If you find a leak, replace the hose.
7. Connect an OBD-II scanner to the car's OBD-II port to check if the ECM/PCM is detecting an error code. If you do not have a scanner, most auto parts stores will do this for you for free. If you plan on maintaining your own vehicle, I would recommend getting one for yourself. Depending on sophistication, you can get one as cheap one around $25 to a couple of hundred dollars.
8. Clean you fuel injectors. At this point, you can be confident that the amount of air getting to your engine has been properly measured and the amount of combustible fuel is off (e.g. the fuel is not being properly atomized). I use Marvel Mystery Oil for this. I add 4 oz/10 gallons of fuel in the tank (i.e. 6 oz for my 16 gallon tank) every 3,000 miles. I've used MMO starting with my carburetor cars (Yes, I am that old) with excellent results and it is better than the crap they try to sell you at the auto parts store. If they are gummed up, it may take a couple of tanks to get them clean. But it is a lot cheaper than having a mechanic clean or replace them for you.

I don't know how much you are mechanically inclined and willing to open the hood and 'crawl around inside'. But since you posted this question here, I will assume that you are willing. I've tried to make this list starting at simplest to progressively more complicated and least likely.


The engineers at Mazda have, in my experience, created a very good car. This type of problem is probably due to wear and tear and you need to discover what is worn out or torn.
Thanks for contributing to the thread with great info but the simplest would be the TB reset posted. Then look for cracks in the intake hose and vac lines. Then clean MAF and TB.

The 1st gen has no inline fuel filters due to them being built into the fuel pump. One would have to replace the pump assembly to change the filters in other words.

Without seeing a video or knowing the car personally we can only suggest things at this time. Assuming all maintenance is good, it sounds as if it's just the standard 1st gen TB lag and one should reset the throttle curve. It's almost like readjusting a 10yo throttle body cable. Beings that we are drive by wire, we can't simply loosen up a nut and take the slack out of the cable. We have to make the TB and pedal relearn the throttle position.
 

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I’m gonna try this just to check because I have a hestitation or delay in acceleration now but with the air box removed and coils plugs cleaned the Maf cleaned the throttle body and egr but maybe it a delay in the transmission I’ve been working over on figuring out when I’m gonna do that but getting drilled and slotted rotors this week so hopefully I can do it all this weekend not exactly sure how to posts pictures on here but if some were too I’d gladly do so 2004 v6 can’t tell if it’s the sport but 5 spd ATX gold on beige nearly stock was also considering a chipped tune but not sure if anyone’s done that
 

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I’ve got like seven thousandish... miles on the iridium plugs but and cleaned the tb IM MAF CAI and it’s definitely much quicker and I’ve probably done three oil changes since I’ve had and maybe 17k-20k miles on it road trips lots of backroads highways but I’d say the shift lag I have in shift mode it’s kinda delayed or it is automatic but something is wearing out can’t really say where have checked or changed tranny fluid which probably my next move
 

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Slowly, consistently and at the even rate, depress the throttle pedal completely to the floor. BE SMOOTH!!!
Once down completely, Slowly, consistently and at the same rate, RELEASE the throttle pedal completely from the floor.
Ive been trying to do the throttle reset for weeks and never saw this part of the instructions before. I have a feeling that this is what I've been missing. I can't wait to give this a try tomorrow! Thanks.
 

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@Buzby did you ever come up with a solution? Do you think the delay could also be related to your engine mounts? A worn out mount would allow the engine to move when you floor it, rather than keeping the engine in place and directing all that initial energy to the axle. I dunno.... i'm just throwing around ideas as they come to me.
 
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