Mazda 6 Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As most of you DIY owners know, Mazda in their infinite wisdom decided to source their current 2.5 Turbo oil filters from Thailand, instead of the original Tokyo Roki units from Japan. Other manufacturers have done this in the past, Toyota went to Thai sourced filters some years ago (denoted by a YZZ in the part number) and Honda changed from a Filtech manufactured unit (A01) to the A02 manufactured by Fram (gasp!). Why are they doing this? PROFITS! All of the redesigned filters are made more cheaply than the originals, and therefore have a larger profit margin. I have managed to purchase 30+ Tokyo Roki filters (part number PY8W-14-302) which should get me through 150,000 miles on my newly acquired Mazda 6. I also ended up with a few of the crappy Thai replacements (from an eBay supplier that assured me they had a large number of the originals, and then sent me the crummy ones). The new part number is 1WPY-14-302.
I dissected both filters and took a bunch of photos....
Box Label
Text Font Material property Calligraphy Label

First the boxes...not much difference, but the Japanese filter comes in a box with glued flaps for additional security, although both filters had shrink wrap plastic over the business ends. The inner flaps had installation instructions, interesting that the Japanese filter called for tightening 1 turn after contact, whereas the Thai filter called for the more common 3/4 turn.
Tin Metal

Here's a side view, not much difference here, although the Japanese filter has a little shinier finish. Both are marked with the double line denoting these filters are for the Turbo engines.

The bottom view shows the first major difference...diameter. The Japanese filter is larger at ~66.8 mm, whereas the Thai filter is ~64.2 mm. Those of you who have been using a cup wrench on your filters will need to buy a smaller one. They both have 14 flats.
Wheel Auto part Rim Alloy wheel Automotive wheel system

The top view shows some interesting differences...the Japanese filter has 6 6mm round holes, whereas the Thai filter has eight elongated holes 4mm wide. A rough estimate of total area shows the Japanese filter at 169.6 square mm total area, with the Thai filter at 228.5 square mm total area. That would indicate the flow rate of the Thai filter is higher. Another difference is the mounting boss of the Japanese filter is thicker and has 5 screw threads, the Thai filter only has 4 threads. You can see the filter element pleats on the Thai filter directly through the holes, the Japanese filter has metal end caps on the element.
Product Room Vehicle Metal Car
Car Vehicle Auto part Measuring instrument Mid-size car

The Japanese filter weighs 217 grams, the Thai filter is lighter at 165 grams. Weighing the individual parts after disassembly shows the significant differences were in the mounting bosses (Japanese-96g, Thai-77g) and the internals (Japanese-73g, Thai-44g).
Bangle Metal Auto part
The Japanese sealing gasket is more robust than that on the Thai filter, that may explain the extra 1/4 turn specified for tightening. Both gaskets have a ridge at the bottom that locks them into a groove on the mounting boss to prevent them from coming loose during installation or removal.
Auto part Oil filter Rim

Here are both filters disassembled...the Japanese filter has metal end caps on both ends of the element, and uses a rubber gasket on the center hole to seal the element against the mounting boss. The bypass valve is built into the lower end cap on the Japanese filter, whereas it is in the tensioner spring on the Thai filter. Neither filter has an anti-drainback valve, however it is not needed since the filter hangs vertically down from the engine.
So what are we to make of all this? The only possible advantage I see in the new filter is the increased oil flow rate from the larger holes in the mounting boss. Everything else in the Thai filter seems cheaper. Of course the new filter must have been approved for use by a Mazda engineering group, and they aren't about to jeopardize longevity of their engines for the sake of a little more profit from each filter. On the other hand, they could only be concerned with average longevity for the first owner/lessee, which might only be 50,000 miles or so...those of us who buy used or who keep their cars for over 100,000 miles might end up screwed in the end. The moral is...if I only had the Thai filters at my disposal, I would change them every 2,500 miles (and top up the oil) and drain the sump every 5,000 miles. Overkill? Maybe, but at least I would have peace of mind!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,739 Posts
Very good and complete treatise. Bravo! :) . Now if I could only get my hands on the original 66mm Tokyo Roki fit to my '17 (normally aspirated) Mazda6 - I'd be 'real happy... Mebe a source in Japan? PE01-14-302-B?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very good and complete treatise. Bravo! :) . Now if I could only get my hands on the original 66mm Tokyo Roki fit to my '17 (normally aspirated) Mazda6 - I'd be 'real happy... Mebe a source in Japan? PE01-14-302-B?
A quick check of eBay shows 3 of them, but one turkey in Brooklyn wants $53 for it, one ships from Russia, and another from Sharjah UAE! Too bad no one seems to have stockpiles of them.
 

·
Registered
2018 Mazda 6 Grand Touring Reserve
Joined
·
8 Posts
Thank OP for the detailed comparison. Looks like Mazda has replaced the Japan made filter with Thailand made nationwide. An amazon shop (a Mazda dealer in MN) sent me Thai filter despite that the store page says it's Japan made PY8W-14-302. I wanted a replacement and here is what they replied:

"Hello,
I'm sorry, but Mazda no longer supplies the PY8W-14-302 oil filter and is replaced by 1WPY-14-302. There is no stock of PY8W-14-302 in any Mazda warehouse in North America. When we place an order with Mazda for PY8W-14-302, Mazda sends us 1WPY-14-302. We cannot get the PY8W-14-302 any longer. Let me know what you would like to do.
Thanks, Mazdagear"

So the chance of getting Japan made filter online or offline from a dealer is very low. Any idea of how we can get hold of the Japan made PY8W-14-302 or do we have to stick with the Thai replacement?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I managed to find about 35 of the original Japanese filters on eBay, but I also ended up with 10 of the crappy Thai filters. I had ordered and received 20 of the Japanese filters from a supplier, but when I placed an order for more from them a week later, they sent the Thai filters. The trouble is, the turkeys on eBay and Amazon haven't updated their photos and listings to show the Thai filter. Your only hope is to find someone on eBay who has one or two of the good filters...anyone with a large stock is bound to have nothing but the garbage ones. At least I saw the writing on the wall and got enough good ones to last over 100,000 miles. I saw what was going to happen because the same thing happened with my Toyota truck about 20 years ago (Japanese filters replaced with Maylasian) and our Honda Accord about 15 years ago (Filtech built replaced by Fram built...ugh!).

Thank OP for the detailed comparison. Looks like Mazda has replaced the Japan made filter with Thailand made nationwide. An amazon shop (a Mazda dealer in MN)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I realize that I'm about 9 months late to this discussion. I came across this forum while researching how I could get the older PY8W-14-302 for my 2018 Mazda 6 Grand Touring Reserve. I was able to obtain the older oil filter from my Mazda dealer for the first couple oil changes, but then they went with the 1WPY-14-302. I ended up ordering what was advertised as the PY8W-14-302 from a Mazda dealer in Avondale Arizona, who was advertising on Amazon. They had pictures and a description of the older filter, but still sent me the 1WPY-14-302. I thought this was a bit of false advertising, and left them a review on Amazon stating so. In my review I stated that I would be using the Wix 51365XP filter in the future. Since that review, and after much more research, I decided on the Wix 51365 (non XP) filter for a few reasons. An alternative to that filter, which is also made by Wix, is the NAPA Gold 1365 filter. These two filters should be identical to each other. These two filters appear to be superior to even the PY8W-14-302. The construction appears to be as good, or better, and I like that both filters have the bypass valve up front (as does the PY8W). The Wix XP, as well as the NAPA Platinum versions of these filters have a cheaper bypass valve in the back of the filter, which could (theoretically) let more dirt and contaminants through if the bypass valve were to ever open. The front bypass valve just looks to be a better design to me. And it looks more expensive, which is why most manufacturers probably implement the rear bypass valve. The XP and NAPA Platinum do use synthetic filter media, but if I'm changing my oil every 5,000 miles, then I don't think the synthetic media is a must have. If I changed my oil every 10,000 miles, then maybe. But that's not recommended for the turbo engine, nor would I want to wait that long between oil changes. The Wix 51365 and NAPA Gold filters seem to be better constructed than the XP and Platinum versions. Check out YouTube for comparisons. I recently bought the 51365 and NAPA 1365 Gold filters, and I will be using either/both in the future. I wanted to use the OEM filter while still under warranty, and if the PY8W was still available, then I would happily use that. But the 1WPY is an inferior filter, and I can get something much better for the same price (or less). Just my 2 cents. Sorry for rambling. I'll try to include pics of the 2 filters I recently bought.

p.s.- the antidrainback valve isn't necessary for this engine, but it's not really hurting anything either.
241449

241444
241445
241446
241447
241448
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
As most of you DIY owners know, Mazda in their infinite wisdom decided to source their current 2.5 Turbo oil filters from Thailand, instead of the original Tokyo Roki units from Japan. Other manufacturers have done this in the past, Toyota went to Thai sourced filters some years ago (denoted by a YZZ in the part number) and Honda changed from a Filtech manufactured unit (A01) to the A02 manufactured by Fram (gasp!). Why are they doing this? PROFITS! All of the redesigned filters are made more cheaply than the originals, and therefore have a larger profit margin. I have managed to purchase 30+ Tokyo Roki filters (part number PY8W-14-302) which should get me through 150,000 miles on my newly acquired Mazda 6. I also ended up with a few of the crappy Thai replacements (from an eBay supplier that assured me they had a large number of the originals, and then sent me the crummy ones). The new part number is 1WPY-14-302.
I dissected both filters and took a bunch of photos.... View attachment 239163 View attachment 239164
First the boxes...not much difference, but the Japanese filter comes in a box with glued flaps for additional security, although both filters had shrink wrap plastic over the business ends. The inner flaps had installation instructions, interesting that the Japanese filter called for tightening 1 turn after contact, whereas the Thai filter called for the more common 3/4 turn.
View attachment 239165
Here's a side view, not much difference here, although the Japanese filter has a little shinier finish. Both are marked with the double line denoting these filters are for the Turbo engines.
View attachment 239166
The bottom view shows the first major difference...diameter. The Japanese filter is larger at ~66.8 mm, whereas the Thai filter is ~64.2 mm. Those of you who have been using a cup wrench on your filters will need to buy a smaller one. They both have 14 flats.
View attachment 239168
The top view shows some interesting differences...the Japanese filter has 6 6mm round holes, whereas the Thai filter has eight elongated holes 4mm wide. A rough estimate of total area shows the Japanese filter at 169.6 square mm total area, with the Thai filter at 228.5 square mm total area. That would indicate the flow rate of the Thai filter is higher. Another difference is the mounting boss of the Japanese filter is thicker and has 5 screw threads, the Thai filter only has 4 threads. You can see the filter element pleats on the Thai filter directly through the holes, the Japanese filter has metal end caps on the element.
View attachment 239169 View attachment 239170
The Japanese filter weighs 217 grams, the Thai filter is lighter at 165 grams. Weighing the individual parts after disassembly shows the significant differences were in the mounting bosses (Japanese-96g, Thai-77g) and the internals (Japanese-73g, Thai-44g).
View attachment 239171 The Japanese sealing gasket is more robust than that on the Thai filter, that may explain the extra 1/4 turn specified for tightening. Both gaskets have a ridge at the bottom that locks them into a groove on the mounting boss to prevent them from coming loose during installation or removal.
View attachment 239172
Here are both filters disassembled...the Japanese filter has metal end caps on both ends of the element, and uses a rubber gasket on the center hole to seal the element against the mounting boss. The bypass valve is built into the lower end cap on the Japanese filter, whereas it is in the tensioner spring on the Thai filter. Neither filter has an anti-drainback valve, however it is not needed since the filter hangs vertically down from the engine.
So what are we to make of all this? The only possible advantage I see in the new filter is the increased oil flow rate from the larger holes in the mounting boss. Everything else in the Thai filter seems cheaper. Of course the new filter must have been approved for use by a Mazda engineering group, and they aren't about to jeopardize longevity of their engines for the sake of a little more profit from each filter. On the other hand, they could only be concerned with average longevity for the first owner/lessee, which might only be 50,000 miles or so...those of us who buy used or who keep their cars for over 100,000 miles might end up screwed in the end. The moral is...if I only had the Thai filters at my disposal, I would change them every 2,500 miles (and top up the oil) and drain the sump every 5,000 miles. Overkill? Maybe, but at least I would have peace of mind!
“Peace of mind,” you say. Yeah, put a price on that. I’m in your camp on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,564 Posts
I've run exclusively Mazda filters since I got my '15; it has roughly 250,000 miles on it now. It consumes less than 1/2qt of oil over a 7,500 mile interval, which is what I run. Most of the time the oil has been Pennzoil 0w20; a few times Castrol and I think I've run Mobil 1 once. If someone's got one at $3-4 less than the other, that's what I get. Which filter I used at any given time was simply a function of what the stealer had. I've run the Japanese ones, the Thai ones, and the Mexican ones. The stealer where I used to live always did "buy 3, get 4" on oil filters so they got bought 4 at a time. I got two sets before leaving NW FL and still have a number of them left; they're all Mexican. In fact I just put one on the car, and have a Thai one, used, that I drained but didn't toss.

If I remember I'll take both apart after I change the oil the next time. Might be a bit messy but I think I can handle it. :)

I've got plenty of UOAs from this engine. None have ever shown any difference in terms of results; all have shown very close to zero wear metal numbers.

Given this I don't much care which one of the three the stealer has for sale.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top