Mazda 6 Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Lowspeed
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Helped a local swap in a LuK clutch & Fidanza FW, replace his rear main seal and reseal his PTO & install SP63 bearing caps. We also did a stainless clutch line and flushed in fresh brake/clutch fluid as well as the needed fresh fluids for the trans & PTO.

Tell ya what, it was enough work that I'm going to be content just topping off my seeping PTO for a while longer, rather than pulling & resealing that bastard....

Weekend or two later we also cleaned his intake valves and did the EGR delete- the pic below shows the chunks scraped out after soaking with denatured alcohol and using brass bristle brushes in the battery drill. He was over 120K miles and the valves had never been cleaned... ewwwwww :surprise:








Valves-


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
@TiGraySpeed6 I need to do my clutch soon and I'm about to start buying everything I need. Did you use the pilot+throwout bearings that come with the LUK kit, or would you recommend better ones? Any other parts you would recommend replacing while I'm in there? I think I remember reading on MSF its a good idea to replace the fork and rear main seal. I'm thinking I'll also do the SS clutch line too since it's not very expensive.
 

·
Lowspeed
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I did use the LuK TOB, but not the pilot bearing. The clutch went in with my long block which had a pilot bearing already installed. Gotta love a shiny new long block!

What FW are you thinking about? I'm really fond of the faster reacting Fidanza, but I hear Rock Auto has the stock dual mass unit for a really good price- I think it was $550ish, but am not positive on that number- was a darn sight less than the dealer for sure.

Wouldn't hurt to do the rear main seal while your that deep in. The clutch fork is a 50/50 thing for me- stock clutch you probably won't need it. I didn't swap my fork, nor did we swap the one in the car shown in the first post of this thread. If you were going for anything heavier- ACT or anything upgraded from the LuK, I would swap the fork without question. It's just a basic stamped steel part, and much like our original HPFP, just good enough for stock use. So, 50/50, up to you totally.

Speaking of, you may want to take the opportunity to reseal your PTO too. There are several seals for the PTO but the only one I've ever needed to replace is on the passenger side between the spacer tube and the PTO. If you have the extra few dollars to spare a set of CNC'd bearing end caps are a nice upgrade while you've got the PTO out and split open, and they're stupid easy to install. Getting there is the hard part :)

- Stainless braided clutch line is a great idea, and a fine time to flush in fresh fluid for both brakes and clutch.
- You shouldn't need to replace either the clutch master or slave cylinders, but call around and learn about price and availability just so you're aware if things go sideways.
- Pick up a new set of stock FW bolts- they shouldn't be reused.
- Loctite, both blue & red- you really really don't want the fw or clutch bolts backing out
- Loctite gray gasket stuff for the PTO, and for the oil pan if you do the RMS.

Save the box top from the clutch, and as you remove the bolts from the trans & PTO punch em through the cardboard to remember where and from which direction they go back. Some go from the drivers side, some from the passenger side, and I swear no two are the same damn length...

Do have a trans jack- borrowed, rented, stolen or even buy one. I know a few who have muscled the trans out and in, but I honestly couldn't imagine trying to do that without the trans jack. Personally I wouldn't even try without one- bitch be heavy!

All told we spent three slow and short days doing the clutch/FW, the rear main and resealing the PTO & installing the end caps in the PTO- about 20 actual work hours. Of that, I think about 12 was taking everything apart, about 2 installing new stuff, and the remainder reassembling all the bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
At first I was thinking LUK+Fidanza, but then I started thinking, since I'm starting to put more time/money into this car (new job, mo' money :D ), should I just go ahead and get something that can handle more HP so I have room to grow? So I guess I should ask, do you know how much HP the LUK+Fidanza can reliably handle? Maybe it's already enough. I need to do more research on alternatives but I've heard good things about South Bend's kits.

I knew about the FW bolts, but haven't heard much about the PTO stuff so I'll definitely look into that. What's the advantage of upgraded bearing end caps?

I'm definitely going to find a trans jack. I'm good at running, not big muscles haha. I also need to get my beater Supra running first so I can get to work while the 6 is up on jacks... ugh.
 

·
Lowspeed
Joined
·
6,280 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The bearing end caps are here-
SP63 Transfer Case Bearing Caps For Mazda MZR-DISI - SPEED PERF6RMANC3

in short, they're probably optional for under 400hp, but if your PTO is leaking/seeping, and you're going to have it out anyway, you might as well do them too. Up to you tho- I'm honestly debating on if I'll do mine or not when I reseal the PTO, but it fully falls into the "while you're in that deep might as well do everything" logic for sure.

The Luk will hold reliably till you're over 400hp. I'm putting down ~360hp/350tq on my pump gas tune and it holds like a champ. On my e85 tune, which I pretty much never run any more, it's ~435hp/390tq and I can make it slip on a really hard launch- LC set at 4750 RPM for both tunes. In my daily aggressive driving style it holds fine for either, but but yeah that limit is around 430ish.

Temper that with your driving style- if you often launch/drag or are otherwise hard on your clutch go bigger for sure. If you like the stocker, and just want it to feel a bit lighter and more responsive, the fidanza will get you exactly that. Southbend is supposed to be an excellent choice if your power goals, or driving style, dictate. I'd go SB before getting an ACT for sure, but personal preference there.

@2006_MS6; I've done the valves a few times now, and never once have I seen the carbon be light enough that I'd trust a spray style cleaner. If you know yours aren't bad, or just for regular maintenance to keep em clean, it would probably work great.

As an example I've got ~27,000 miles on this engine. From first start it's had an OCC and EGR delete but it's already got chunks on the intake valves.

It might be worth trying, but would still need to pull the IM before and after to compare and quantify results, and be prepared to do a regular cleaning after if needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Sounds like I'll be OK sticking to LUK, which is good because that frees up more cash for other fun parts! Thanks a ton, hopefully I can get this done soon, the slipping clutch is getting annoying.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
@2006_MS6; I've done the valves a few times now, and never once have I seen the carbon be light enough that I'd trust a spray style cleaner. If you know yours aren't bad, or just for regular maintenance to keep em clean, it would probably work great.

As an example I've got ~27,000 miles on this engine. From first start it's had an OCC and EGR delete but it's already got chunks on the intake valves.

It might be worth trying, but would still need to pull the IM before and after to compare and quantify results, and be prepared to do a regular cleaning after if needed.
No doubt it would never get all of it, but someone on MSF did a comparison & this CRC stuff didn't do a bad job at all. However, my concern is where is all this buildup going after the spray loosens it? I don't need that crap ruining my turbo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,763 Posts
CRC told me that it will not damage the turbo, but I'm still hesitant to try it. That debris still has to go somewhere!!!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top