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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
That's pretty scary... Says it's 'way better not to engage. That's easy for me to SAY, not so much to PRACTISE.
I'm usually the same way, but I figured I had the entire rest of the traffic around me as a witness to whatever may have occurred. Some other guy in a truck behind us saw the whole thing and gave the dude an earful for us. :D
 

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Do they salt the roads in montana? Or do they just use mag chloride? If they just use mag, there is no reason to seal the underside. I agree that your Miata will be a beast in the snow with some proper studless tires.
I have never lived in a snow/rust belt state (I live in Florida, after all) but my high school chemistry tells me that Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) is a salt, just like Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) and will cause rust just as much. My quick check online tells me that it is perhaps worse, based on some of its physical properties. I would err on the side of caution and still take the necessary precautions.
 

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I have never lived in a snow/rust belt state (I live in Florida, after all) but my high school chemistry tells me that Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) is a salt, just like Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) and will cause rust just as much. My quick check online tells me that it is perhaps worse, based on some of its physical properties. I would err on the side of caution and still take the necessary precautions.
I have never lived in a place they used road salt either. But they use a lot of MgCl brine solution and we just don't have rust problems where I live. You see it on the roads every morning they think there might be a good frost. When I have visited places like Minnesota, I am appalled at the apocalyptic rust problems they have on basically every car. I remember seeing unibodies on cars only 4-5 years old with rust perforated all the way through them. I have never seen anything like that where I live. I have owned 30-year old cars that have spent their entire lives in this state, and have never seen rust perforate a panel except where there was body damage.

I am not a corrosion expert but I believe that MgCl is just as bad for the roads as normal sodium chloride, but it doesn't seem to get on the cars at all. Our state DOT says that MgCl is really bad for the structural steel in our bridges, but they might just be looking for their next paycheck too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I think there's a combination of things going on here. We can't compare cars of today to cars of 20 - 30+ years ago because the materials used in making the frames/etc are vastly cheaper now and can't hold up to the elements regardless of what's on the road.

That being said, the brine 100% gets on your vehicles even in dry conditions - I drove plenty of miles in my 6 and picked up so much thin film all over my car. I specifically remember days where you could see the brine/salt/whatever as a cloud of haze above the road from all the traffic going over it.
 

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I think there's a combination of things going on here. We can't compare cars of today to cars of 20 - 30+ years ago because the materials used in making the frames/etc are vastly cheaper now and can't hold up to the elements regardless of what's on the road.
The steels used in cars today are generally the same alloys over the past several decades. I don't know where you are getting your information, but the quality of those steels, if it has changed at all, has probably improved, just due to better QC in the manufacturing process. There are definitely more high-strength steel alloys being used in unibody frames than in previous decades. But one way or the other, the coating is what stops rust in the unibody, not the alloy. Any steel will rust when exposed to water, unless it is a stainless alloy or if it's treated with galvanization, but unibodies are neither of those.
 

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I visited Wisconsin a few years ago and I was shocked..mortified...to see the destruction that cars face there due to rust. The roads were also eye-sores, no doubt as a result of freeze-thaw. I was there for a job interview and after seeing all that nonsense, I withdrew from the interview process. My Subaru Forester was originally owned by somebody who lived in NH, I think and it wasn't in bad condition body-wise, but the suspension and drivetrain pieces were fairly well corroded (it took two days of pounding, banging, begging, beseeching, swearing, and sweating to get the rear bearings off). At this point in my life I would NEVER buy a vehicle that was from anywhere further north than GA. I simply cannot believe that these municipalities can't find something better to deal with the roads than something that causes so much damage to vehicles, buildings, and other infrastructure.
 
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The steels used in cars today are generally the same alloys over the past several decades. I don't know where you are getting your information, but the quality of those steels, if it has changed at all, has probably improved, just due to better QC in the manufacturing process. There are definitely more high-strength steel alloys being used in unibody frames than in previous decades. But one way or the other, the coating is what stops rust in the unibody, not the alloy. Any steel will rust when exposed to water, unless it is a stainless alloy or if it's treated with galvanization, but unibodies are neither of those.
Mazda, and not only Mazda, but Mazda in particular seems to do a deplorable job of phosphating and E-Coating their fabricated subframes and other suspension members. Also, it appears to me that they use dirty steels for the same fabrications that if uncoated- or if the poor excuse for a coating system fails - vigorously corrode with spalled-off chunks of steel. You've seen it: corrosion beyond the realm of normal or average. So, as to the comment that modern day methodologies and materials are superior to those in past - I'd disagree, if we're talking about Mazda's. The OP should do his best to protect subframes and suspension fabrications with the best creeping/self-healing waxy preservative materials he can suss out... now, or 'real soon!
 

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The OP should do his best to protect subframes and suspension fabrications with the best creeping/self-healing waxy preservative materials he can suss out... NOW...
Agreed. Because once that rust starts it will never stop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
. The OP should do his best to protect subframes and suspension fabrications with the best creeping/self-healing waxy preservative materials he can suss out... now, or 'real soon!
Agreed. Because once that rust starts it will never stop.
Nah, first thing on the list (and on the books for June) is XPEL paint protectant for the entire front end and entire hood. Because of the low amounts of rain in our parts and the vast amount of water needed to sustain the farms/growing population, salt is never used for winter road treatment. They will "chip" the roads prior to winter, which involves dumping a large amount of crumbled (small rock-sized) tar chunks connected with maleable tar on the roads. The concoction covers the entire road and allows for a fair amount of additional grip.

The unfortunate side-effect of chipping the roads is that they're littered with small rocks with a vengeance for hitting windshields. We've got full windshield protection on this car and will be getting the XPel cover to ensure our best chances of not catching an errant paint-ruiner.
 

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I was in Miami for a work event (driving exotic cars at Homestead speedway) last month - tough work. But the rental aisle at National surprised me, as this was one of the choices which naturally I took. Slushbox unfortunately, but still a fun little ride. Tough getting in and out of, and hard to believe many people would really choose it as a rental, as I could barely fit my carry-on in the trunk. That said, I still don't see much draw to the hard top. I'd much rather have the full convertible, at least if I was in FL. If I lived in a snowbelt state, maybe, but at that point it's not getting out much in the bad weather anyway if it's a 2nd car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I was in Miami for a work event (driving exotic cars at Homestead speedway) last month - tough work. But the rental aisle at National surprised me, as this was one of the choices which naturally I took. Slushbox unfortunately, but still a fun little ride. Tough getting in and out of, and hard to believe many people would really choose it as a rental, as I could barely fit my carry-on in the trunk. That said, I still don't see much draw to the hard top. I'd much rather have the full convertible, at least if I was in FL. If I lived in a snowbelt state, maybe, but at that point it's not getting out much in the bad weather anyway if it's a 2nd car.
To each his/her own I suppose. We rented the convertible for a vacation once to confirm that our luggage fits perfectly in the trunk. We also confirmed that we much prefer the hard top for several reasons (explained in reply to cdn's post). We're also small people, so getting in/out isn't an issue for us. Sure, it's low to the ground, but what do you expect from a sports car?


Convertible tops have a finite life; they're spendy to replace... That's one consideration. Also, roadnoise?
Correct, they fade despite best efforts and will eventually need replacing. The hard top has more pieces that can fail, however, and I can't imagine it's cheap to replace, but at least I know the top itself won't degrade over time. When our hard top is up, you're in a fully enclosed ca and road noise is nominal (realizing you're in a low-slung sports car with stiff suspension). We also live where it's perfectly sunny but can be 0F out, so the hard top will keep us warmer while cruising.
 

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Hey everyone,

Work has been keeping me beyond busy, so I haven't had much time to spend on here lately. It's also just getting to the end of winter here, so I haven't had too many chances to get out and enjoy the road. That being said, most of my driving over the last month has been via our new Mazda adventure.

My wife and I finally got the finances in order to get ourselves our dream car: a 2020 Mazda Miata RF Grand Touring in Soul Red Crystal! We drove 800 miles (12 hours total) through mountain passes to get this thing before it was scooped up. The car only has 7400 miles on it and is hands down the most fun car I've ever driven.

The 6 isn't going anywhere, and neither am I (6club is my home), but this thing is definitely going to be getting the majority of the attention in the near future. Plus, the 6 is exactly how I want it at this point, so I don't see any more mods coming for it in the near future. It's SO good to be driving a stick again.

View attachment 246053 View attachment 246052
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Eventual Mods:
  • XPEL Front Bumper/Hood protectant.
  • Custom matching red shift knob.
  • Front Splitter
  • Side Skirts
  • Rear difuser
  • Small trunk spoiler (like the 6)
  • Painted calipers.
  • (Maybe) Red Lugs
  • LED the things.
How is the fit for your height, Byakuya? I’d love one of those but am 6’-2” and when I sit in a Miata at the dealership it feels too constrained for me, especially the legroom. Thanks.
 

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How is the fit for your height, Byakuya? I’d love one of those but am 6’-2” and when I sit in a Miata at the dealership it feels too constrained for me, especially the legroom. Thanks.
Hes a short ass Asian ;) Im 6ft and dont fit either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
How is the fit for your height, Byakuya? I’d love one of those but am 6’-2” and when I sit in a Miata at the dealership it feels too constrained for me, especially the legroom. Thanks.
Not gonna lie, this car probably isn't made for anyone over 6ft. You can adjust things a bit to try and get that extra leg room but, as far as I can tell, it's even smaller than previous gens. I'm 5'7" and wife is 5'4" and it's like th car is built for us specifically.

Hes a short ass Asian ;) Im 6ft and dont fit either.
Close, but no cigar. :p

I'm short but I'm a mix breed of mostly French Canadian, German, Irish, and other Western European. So far as I know, no Asian.
 

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I'm short but I'm a mix breed of mostly French Canadian, German, Irish, and other Western European. So far as I know, no Asian.
Hmm, i thought you said you were lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Went on a much needed vaca for the first time in a couple years. Took the Miata for a (total) 2000 mile road trip down to Colorado and back. Loved driving it every second!

Right before the vaca, we got it outfitted with an XPEL protective film over the entire hood, front bumper, front fenders, and mirrors. I also hardwired a dash cam (front + back) into the car. Here's some pics of our adventures with it!

Near the summit of Pike's Peak (we were there RIGHT before the 100th running of the hill climb - saw some awesome cars practicing).
Wheel Tire Sky Vehicle Car

On the way down Pike's peak.
Wheel Tire Sky Cloud Car

And these were on our way to a cool hiking spot in the hills - also the reason the tires got so dirty. (Photos taken by my wife since we didn't have much time with traffic around).
Car Vehicle Plant Automotive lighting Personal luxury car

Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive lighting


We also got a kind of cool video of the car taking one of the many hairpins - will upload it when I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Forgot to mention: running on preimum (recommended by Mazda), going 78mph cruise control with the AC on the entire time, this thing averaged 38mpgs! Definitely surpassed my expectations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
What methodology- and what luggage did you use? It is space constrained, it seems to me, but did you use 'lotsa soft bags?
Yes. :D

So, we had rented one of these for vacation a few years ago to test this exact thing. We can fit both of our travel bags in it (~4 days of clothes each) if we do it just right. For this trip, we took the following and it all fit in the trunk when packed properly (hanger used for size reference) :
  • 1 Travel bag (blue/gray) filled to bursting with both our clothes and 4 pairs of shoes (1 for hiking, 1 not).
  • 1 toiletries bag (white/black).
  • 1 electronics back (orange) with laptop, charger, phone chargers, and some survival items like solar pack, flashlights, etc.
  • 2 day hiking packs (teal and black). Nothing but an empty water bladder in each.
  • 2 Chemical Guys cleaners, a windshield cleaner, headlight cleaner, roll of paper towels, and 3 microfiber cloths (for cleaning the bugs).
  • Some misc. items such as bear spray, sunscreen, and my wife's purse.

  • There's also some empty space behind the seats where we stored a large photo print a friend gave us.
  • There's a secret little storage behind the passenger seat we used for misc things like small tissue packs.
  • The center storage behind the water bottle holders has enough room for maybe 4 user manuals, but we didn't use it much.
Luggage and bags Bag Sleeve Personal protective equipment Electric blue
 
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