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Honestly, while the salt/sand/gravel aren't good for your car, it's the brine solution that's doing the greatest amount of corrosion. It's also the most efficient and cost-effective method for pre-treating roads, so more an more places are using it. That stuff touches everything on your car and takes a lot to get rid of.
Yeah, I've seen that brine crap in use out east and heard how nasty it is. Up here, everything with the exception of state roads, is plowed to snow cover only. It's slicker but if you take your time, your gonna do just fine. They dump at intersections only.
 

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That brine crap is nonsense and people ought to go ballistic on the municipalities that use it, but they don't and won't. The only thing it's efficient at is destroying your vehicle, especially any vehicle that has multiple metals or alloys (and that's all of them these days.)

Remember that a galvanic cell ("battery" in other words) is made out of two dissimilar metals and an electrolyte (that is, water + any sort of ionic compound.) Salt does just fine for that since it's NaCl, which in water dissolves to Na+ and Cl-. Put two dissimilar metals joined by said electrolyte together and the more-electronegative metal will corrode (while the less is protected.)
 

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That brine crap is nonsense and people ought to go ballistic on the municipalities that use it, but they don't and won't. The only thing it's efficient at is destroying your vehicle, especially any vehicle that has multiple metals or alloys (and that's all of them these days.)

Remember that a galvanic cell ("battery" in other words) is made out of two dissimilar metals and an electrolyte (that is, water + any sort of ionic compound.) Salt does just fine for that since it's NaCl, which in water dissolves to Na+ and Cl-. Put two dissimilar metals joined by said electrolyte together and the more-electronegative metal will corrode (while the less is protected.)
While I agree with the brine eating your car, I'm all in favor of using it on the roads. Cost-efficient, more effective, easier/faster to deploy? Sign me up!

Around here, 1 foot of snow in 12 hours isn't uncommon, and yet the majority of our (main) roads will be perfectly clear within 12-24 hours of a storm thanks to the brine (and lots of plows). The brine preps the roads so well that it allows plows to more efficiently clear them - plus it doesn't result in my car getting pelted with giant chunks of salt/frozen sand.

Do I hate what it does to my car? Absolutely - do I love being able to use the roads almost immediately after a storm? You'd better believe it.
 

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While I agree with the brine eating your car, I'm all in favor of using it on the roads. Cost-efficient, more effective, easier/faster to deploy? Sign me up!

Around here, 1 foot of snow in 12 hours isn't uncommon, and yet the majority of our (main) roads will be perfectly clear within 12-24 hours of a storm thanks to the brine (and lots of plows). The brine preps the roads so well that it allows plows to more efficiently clear them - plus it doesn't result in my car getting pelted with giant chunks of salt/frozen sand.

Do I hate what it does to my car? Absolutely - do I love being able to use the roads almost immediately after a storm? You'd better believe it.
Meh.

I lived in northern Michigan, a good half-hour from the nearest "modest sized" town that they called a "city" (in the summer on clear roads!) for quite some time and there was no brine or salt used up there (no local supply and too damn expensive given the density of people to ship it in.) I often came out of my place and had a ~30 mile drive on snow-covered roads, and when I say snow I mean *SNOW*, not a light dusting. They ran big twin-screw snowblowers on the front of dump trucks full of sand down the main roads which was good enough to clear the gross accumulations fast (that would otherwise make the road impassable -- 1'+ of snow + rutting will make for a train wreck, especially after multiple back-to-back nights of that), but did not result in a clear, dry roads by any means.

Without snow tires you were screwed, but with them (and chains in the trunk "just in case") it was entirely navigable. Yes, you had to slow down somewhat, -- big deal. It didn't destroy your car either.

I won't live in a place that brines the streets; they're not paying for the thousands of dollars of damage it does to my vehicles every year on an intentional basis, and I refuse to consent to it -- never mind that I can go do suspension or other work on my cars and actually get things apart using nothing other than ordinary wrenches -- no impact guns or air-chisels required.
 

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I finally had enough of the stock bass and calipers. I did get 90k out of them. I wanted a better stop as I’m a real aggressive driver.

I had custom Wilwood Superlite 4 piston calipers made for the front which needed at least 2.25" of space from the back of the wheel spokes to the rotor surface in order to clear the wheel. It also needed at least 13.6" inner wheel diameter. I have motegi racing rims...17s. I will post a better pic tomorrow as I have to pull the wheels and reposition the ring lights.

Replaced the disks too.

Cost - 1500 installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I finally had enough of the stock bass and calipers. I did get 90k out of them. I wanted a better stop as I’m a real aggressive driver.

I had custom Wilwood Superlite 4 piston calipers made for the front which needed at least 2.25" of space from the back of the wheel spokes to the rotor surface in order to clear the wheel. It also needed at least 13.6" inner wheel diameter. I have motegi racing rims...17s. I will post a better pic tomorrow as I have to pull the wheels and reposition the ring lights.

Replaced the disks too.

Cost - 1500 installed.
Has custom brakes specially made for his car - buys 17" aftermarket wheels to reuse OEM tires.. :D
 

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Opinions of the brand vary. I searched and searched and the only thing I found was big brake kits. I didn’t want large pistons in a four and six was too much. No company that I found had anything in the range I got.

The shop that did work were the ones who worked with wilwood to put the kit together. I’ve only had them for a week. I like the response I’m getting when pressing the pedal...a slight tap and the car begins to slow. Full Depression of the pedal is a smooth and immediate stop. I don’t know all the technical jargon that goes into these things, but at this point I’m enjoying the upgrade. I would have made the same decision if I had 18s.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
If anyone is interested, here is a great read on a thread I started over at Mazdas247 maybe about a year ago. I was speaking with a guy who worked at Ferodo, a German OEM brake supplier for 10-20 years. To conclude, he said that German OEM pads are the most ideal choice because this dusty pad is more gentle on your rotors, effectively cleaning and massaging them as you brake.
@tickerguy, even you may find this an interesting read:

https://www.mazdas247.com/forum/showthread.php?123861722-Brake-Upgrade
 

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I've got some extra cash.....I'm working on trying to find used or new 2016 or newer CX-9 calipers to see if they'll fit.
Found a new on ebay....too pricey, maybe I can talk them down.
 
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