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What do the Mazda denizens think of the Kia Stinger / Genesis G70 as an upgrade/replacement for the 2016 Mazda6?

Only have 30K on my Mazda6, but beginning to start to think about what might come next. Wouldn't be for a while, I don't think. I'd get the V6 twin turbo AWD, I think. Want the power, and probably need AWD as my sole car in Colorado.

Let the discussions begin!
 

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Uh figure out a way to lose or hide the Kia insignia.

All kidding aside, there is a cachet question. Mebe you could debadge. Having said that, I 'kinda like the look of the Hyundai insignia. Kia, NO.

Re the Korean cars, they certainly have the quality... you cannot fault them for that.

Now it may not be an apt comparison... but the other day I drove my Son-In-Law's 2010 Hyundai Tuscon. It was the last of the port-injected cars, 2.4 litres. I would never own that vehicle. Doors sound like they need a patch of asphaltic damping in the middle of 'em... drum pretty badly. That is fixable. What is NOT fixable, on that vehicle, was the electronic throttle calibration. On/off throttle was bad. Just toe'ing the throttle made it surge. If there is one thing I demand... it is proper throttle calibration.

Also, some of the time, my S.I.L. says, when he starts the vehicle... it will not turn left... until he first turns right, or moves the steering wheel towards the right... then it can go left. Weird.

And then, my other S.I.L. has a 2010 Hyundai Elantra. Two things wrong with that car, to my way of thinking. i) it rushes to get into 4th gear of its 4 speed A/T... and then it bogs. It sounds like it's bogging, too. It leads me to want to drive it with 3rd gear selected... i.e. preventing it from going into 4th at city speeds. ii) Lastly, the steering on that car feels like that of a game console. Totally synthetic. The worst of electrically assisted steering. Unconscionable for me.

Sorry to rant. These cars are 8 or 9 years old. Mebe the Kia or Hyundai lines have really, really pulled up their socks when it comes to the vehicle control interfaces. But those two cars, to me, show that at THAT TIME, the Koreans had not yet made it. And in that circumstance, I would NOT care what the value quotient was. It HAS TO tick off some of those kind of boxes for me to even consider the car.
 

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1) I have heard enough horror stories from those Kia/Hyundai that I won't go near them.

2) Even if I did go near them, I'd never pay over 30k for one because, at that point, you've entered a world of better possibilities.
 

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I considered both of them, but they were out of my budget. Fantastic cars with great performance / bang for the buck. If I were spending that much money, I'd take either in a heartbeat. Youtube tester Savagegeese prefers the Hyundai over the Stinger for better refinement. StraightPipes testers Yuri and Jacob have a great youtube testing the Stinger doing drifting in a Las Vegas parking lot. Really impressive performance for a large car. They loved it. I love the hatchback on the Stinger, it provides near sport utility cargo capabilities (like Audi Sportback and Buick GS). Hyundai has HTRAC All wheel drive which is supposed to be really, really good. 720 watt 15 speaker Harman Sound System. Eight Speed Automatic. Huge Entertainment display, Heads up display. Great brakes. 2019 Motor Trend Car of the Year..., ..., ...

On the downside, the lower models (Stinger) are supposed to be very softly sprung for all the performance the car brings. The GT1 and GT2 have electronically controlled suspension.
 

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If the $$$ was there, I'd put the G70 up at the top of the list. I haven't driven one yet (and with the nearest Genesis dealer in Ithaca, 30 miles away, I've seen only one on the roads), but from all I've seen and heard, it's as fun-to-drive and soulful as the E46 was. Since the 3-series has since lost it's way, and the Japanese makes have never (and still can't) come close, I'm kinda anxious to take a G70 out for myself and see if the hype is real or not.

As for the Stinger, it's also a solid choice. It's sized more between the BMW 3- and 5-series, but the 5-door body style is IMO brilliant. I think it has a hard time simply because it's sold in the same showroom as this is:
 

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The G70 is too small for my needs, and some of the interior design is "old" to my eyes. The manual is also a mediocre "money grab" play at the hearts of car guys who yearn for a stick. Every review I've read pretty much confirms the 6 speed's lame implementation.

OTOH I test drove Stinger several times (including a driving event near me where you first drive with a professional followed by taking the wheel). I like the Stinger a lot and had a similar reaction to Savagegeese review. Next to the 6 sig, its a very good looking car. However, between cost and some very cheap materials and creaks/rattles, I decided to go with the 6. Sure while RWD and hatch are VERY compelling, I dont really find the FWD 6 much of a compromise, dynamically or practically in the real world.

Is the V6 nice-well yes, but the 2.5 turbo 4 in the Sig trim is very nice for the money. I also trust Mazda engineering more than Hyundai. I'll continue to be of the opinion, that despite the obvious resource constraints, that a small, tight, engineering-minded company like Mazda is preferable to a larger everything to everyone company like Hyundai, Honda and Toyota. Despite relatively unlimited resources, giant companies have a hard time with scaling processes that contribute to consistently good, well-architected, products

IMO knock on wood but I think Mazda's size, engineering prowess and focus make it better. Said another way, Mazda on its own (without the unbrella of Ford) can't afford to make engineering mistakes that cause major defects resulting in e.g. vehicle fires given the PR and scale would bankrupt them both in brand and business. IMO.

So when I see new tech from Mazda like Skyactiv-X I believe chances are, beyond a few bugs, they will get it right. IMO.

Sent from my SM-N950U1 using Tapatalk
 

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Had a buddy with a Hyundai Tiburon and the transmission blew up. Supposedly it was a known problem but they refused warranty coverage to repair it even though the car was still within the warranty period for time and mileage. So much for Hyundai's "best warranty in the business." Since then, I've refused to even give them the time of day.

I've only driven one Kia. A Soul I rented from Enterprise while my G8 was in the body shop getting some work done after a guy at Best Buy backed into it. This was a few years ago and I'm sure it was a base model car, but it was thoroughly unimpressive in just about every way. Hated the styling. Hated all of the materials inside the cabin. Totally gutless and numb feeling in the brakes and steering. Basically, wasn't a great first impression from. I have seen some Stingers around town and it certainly is a completely different animal and looks nice inside and out. A world of difference from that crappy Soul, but you'd expect that at more than twice the price. Still... Not sure I'd spend that kind of money on a Kia, regardless how well the car has been received. They just don't have a great reputation for quality or reliability around these parts. I'd be kinda leary how it would hold up to Colorado winters. If it's just a fair-weather only car, that might be a different story, but that doesn't sound like the case for you.
 

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G70 and Kia Stinger are high up on my list of possible replacements for my Mazda6. Hyundai is not the same company it was 15 or 20 years ago. The Korean conglomerate has enough resources to hire the best and brightest in the industry and it shows in the signing of Peter Schreyer ( formerly of Audi including the TT), Chris Chapman (formerly of BMW), Perre Leclerq (again, from BMW) and now its newly appointed design chief Luc Donckerwolke from Lamborghini . They have also hired Albert Biermann who was the former head of BMW's coveted 'Division M' , Thomas Schmera and Fayaz Abdul Rahman both senior executive engineers also from BMW M division. It shows that Hyundai/KIA are serious about the vision they have for the company. When manufacturers like Ford, GM, FCA are running away from sedans, Hyundai/KIA are still investing heavily on sedans and hatchbacks. The new i30N, Veloster N, Stinger, G70 are the beginning of an entire line up of performance cars that Hyundai group wants to build at every price point, and i want to do my bit to support their effort that caters to the fast thinning breed of car enthusiasts.

As for recalls and "i knew a guy who had problems" , there's no auto company on this planet including Ferraris and Porsches that have not had to do recalls or mechanical issues when spread among thousands of units sold. Yes, current dealerships are a problem, and i think that's why Hyundai wants Genesis to be a standalone brand like Lexus.

Given the current sales numbers of cars vs suvs, i doubt if mazda will even bother with another 6 when its time to replace the current platform. They sell 6 to 7 times as many suvs than they sell cars, so there's incentive to move away from cars. The other problem for mazda is the rapidly changing automotive landscape where everyone is moving towards some form of automation and supplemental power source. Its 2019 and mazda remains the only mainstream manufacturer without even a hybrid in its lineup. mazda shares manufacturing with Toyota, so mazda will either get absorbed by a big car maker in future or will just go the way of so many brands into oblivion.
 

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I had a 2014 Soul and 2018 Optima(Rear-ended and totaled, which is why I have a Mazda 6 now). I was impressed with both and thought they were very nice vehicles. The 2014 Soul in particular was super reliable, and after a year with my 2018 Optima I never had to go back to the dealer for an issue. When I was in the accident, I came out completely uninjured so I can vouch for the safety.

Hyundai/Kia has had some fumbles for sure, but I'd have no problem buying any 2019 Hyundai/Kia.

Also, the fact that Honda gets a free pass with their 1.5T issues in the CR-V just goes to show the power of brand value. Friend has an issue with their Honda? Must be a fluke. Friend has an issue with their Kia? Kias are horrible!

On flip side, I know two people with Kia Rio's, one with a Kia Forte, and my father owns an Hyundai Elantra GT. All are very satisfied with the value and reliability of their vehicles.

EDIT: Actually, add another tally to people I know with a Kia Forte. I worked with a guy back in California a few years ago who bought a new base Forte and he's been happy with it as well.

I'm also surprised by @Vipre77 's reaction to the Kia Soul. I had the 2014 Soul base, and thought it was a great car for something that stickers for $17,500. But okay.
 

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Also, the fact that Honda gets a free pass with their 1.5T issues in the CR-V just goes to show the power of brand value. Friend has an issue with their Honda? Must be a fluke. Friend has an issue with their Kia? Kias are horrible!
Quoted for agreement. It's the whole bandwagon mentality that passes for facts these days. Don't forget Toyota had some horrible oiling issues with their Corolla engines, yet nobody seems to recall that either...

IF (and that's a big IF) Mazda does decide not to renew the 6, I'd have no issue at all looking at a Korean-based car. Hyundai has come a LONG WAY from their shitbox 80's Excel. They kinda had to, if they've lasted over 30 years in the US. How many American brands have folded in that time? Not to mention Scion...

In fact, I'll bet I know more repeat Hyundai/Kia owners than the "one-and-done" owners.

Yes, the Stinger and G70 may have teething issues, being that it's a new RWD platform, but it wouldn't dissuade me from buying one...
 

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Everything is relative. Maybe it’s nice for a $17,500 car, but I sure wouldn’t buy one unless it was all I could afford or wanted to spend. If that was the situation I was in, I guess I’d learn to be content with it. I don’t know what model year that car I drove was. I think it might have been the first year for them. I thought it was total dog shit. No power and shitty interior materials and layout. Remember, I was driving a Pontiac G8 at the time. The G8’s interior was certainly dated, looking like something from the late 90’s instead of the late ‘00’s, but the quality of what was there was pretty good. At any rate, it’s a totally different class of car and you expect nicer stuff when spending 2-3x as much. My brother in law rode in the Soul, too, and he agreed, but then his car at the time was an Audi S4. Again, it’s all relative.

My wife had a ‘98 Civic DX sedan when we got married and that was a huge POS. By 60,000 miles on the odometer, it was already on its third radiator, 2nd O2 sensor, 2nd crank position sensor, and 2nd water pump. The foam padding in the headliner was dried out and crumbling, creating a cascade of foam dust in your face and on your lap every time you moved the sun visor down. I’m aware that Honda makes junk, also. It’s also why I’ve not looked bothered to look at Honda again again since that car.

My friend’s problems with his Tiburon weren’t an isolated case either. I have a friend that presently works in a local Hyundai dealership body shop. This same dealer also used to sell Mazda, but they sold a lot more Hyundai’s due to lower prices and their “great” warranty terms. Hyundai essentially used its weight to force this dealer to either relocate his Mazda business to another lot or sell it off. That business tactic is hardly unique to Hyundai, but it was strike 2 in my book. Strike 3 was the advice I got from my friend in the body shop regarding build quality he’s seen when fixing them compared to competing cars, and with Hyundai’s habit of often denying warranty claims that he’s seen first hand, similar to what my other friend experienced. With Hyundai’s lower vehicle prices, they don’t have as much wiggle room for “goodwill” programs to fix things that sometimes aren’t explicitly covered under warranty. Meanwhile, Mazda has done this for me a number of times. They’ve happily covered things under warranty that I didn’t even know they could. Things like burnt out light bulbs, they considered a safety issue. Worn door armrest on my CX-3 (foam padding where my elbow rested was taking a permanent set after only about 10,000 miles). That car got creamed by a freaking bus last year that merged into my lane and my daughter and I walked away without even a scratch. This 2018 Mazda6 I have now is the 6th Mazda I’ve owned now and they’ve treated me right, so they’ll keep my business as long as they continue to do so.

According to JD Power dependability ranking for 2018, Kia was ranked #5 and Hyundai #7 . Only luxury brands Lexus, Porsche, Buick, and Infiniti ranked higher than Kia. Not bad. Just don’t put a lot of faith in their heavily advertised warranty coverage. Mazda came in slightly below industry average at 144 problems per 100 cars (industry average is 142).
 

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Everything is relative. Maybe it’s nice for a $17,500 car, but I sure wouldn’t buy one unless it was all I could afford or wanted to spend. If that was the situation I was in, I guess I’d learn to be content with it. I don’t know what model year that car I drove was. I think it might have been the first year for them. I thought it was total dog shit. No power and shitty interior materials and layout. Remember, I was driving a Pontiac G8 at the time. The G8’s interior was certainly dated, looking like something from the late 90’s instead of the late ‘00’s, but the quality of what was there was pretty good. At any rate, it’s a totally different class of car and you expect nicer stuff when spending 2-3x as much. My brother in law rode in the Soul, too, and he agreed, but then his car at the time was an Audi S4. Again, it’s all relative.

My wife had a ‘98 Civic DX sedan when we got married and that was a huge POS. By 60,000 miles on the odometer, it was already on its third radiator, 2nd O2 sensor, 2nd crank position sensor, and 2nd water pump. The foam padding in the headliner was dried out and crumbling, creating a cascade of foam dust in your face and on your lap every time you moved the sun visor down. I’m aware that Honda makes junk, also. It’s also why I’ve not looked bothered to look at Honda again again since that car.

My friend’s problems with his Tiburon weren’t an isolated case either. I have a friend that presently works in a local Hyundai dealership body shop. This same dealer also used to sell Mazda, but they sold a lot more Hyundai’s due to lower prices and their “great” warranty terms. Hyundai essentially used its weight to force this dealer to either relocate his Mazda business to another lot or sell it off. That business tactic is hardly unique to Hyundai, but it was strike 2 in my book. Strike 3 was the advice I got from my friend in the body shop regarding build quality he’s seen when fixing them compared to competing cars, and with Hyundai’s habit of often denying warranty claims that he’s seen first hand, similar to what my other friend experienced. With Hyundai’s lower vehicle prices, they don’t have as much wiggle room for “goodwill” programs to fix things that sometimes aren’t explicitly covered under warranty. Meanwhile, Mazda has done this for me a number of times. They’ve happily covered things under warranty that I didn’t even know they could. Things like burnt out light bulbs, they considered a safety issue. Worn door armrest on my CX-3 (foam padding where my elbow rested was taking a permanent set after only about 10,000 miles). That car got creamed by a freaking bus last year that merged into my lane and my daughter and I walked away without even a scratch. This 2018 Mazda6 I have now is the 6th Mazda I’ve owned now and they’ve treated me right, so they’ll keep my business as long as they continue to do so.

According to JD Power dependability ranking for 2018, Kia was ranked #5 and Hyundai #7 . Only luxury brands Lexus, Porsche, Buick, and Infiniti ranked higher than Kia. Not bad. Just don’t put a lot of faith in their heavily advertised warranty coverage. Mazda came in slightly below industry average at 144 problems per 100 cars (industry average is 142).
Fair enough; I've had a positive experience, having actually owned 2 and knowing several people with their cars so for me they are great cars. Perhaps this was after they started improving. My Mazda 6 has been great as well.
 

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If you were going to choose, I'd go with the Kia Stinger. The Genesis dealers seem to be far and few between and some of the stories about their service are downright scary. Having said that, not sure I'd personally be comfortable with throwing down that kind of money on a Kia. I would have serious reservations about their resale value. Looking up the 2018 Kia Stinger Premium with AWD and Turbo with 15,000mi, NADA trade in lists it at $24,200 for a clean trade-in and $27,175 for clean resale. So I'm guessing only $20K for a trade in. Factory invoice for 2019 is $39,800. That's a pretty scary hit for just one year.
 

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If you were going to choose, I'd go with the Kia Stinger. The Genesis dealers seem to be far and few between and some of the stories about their service are downright scary. Having said that, not sure I'd personally be comfortable with throwing down that kind of money on a Kia. I would have serious reservations about their resale value. Looking up the 2018 Kia Stinger Premium with AWD and Turbo with 15,000mi, NADA trade in lists it at $24,200 for a clean trade-in and $27,175 for clean resale. So I'm guessing only $20K for a trade in. Factory invoice for 2019 is $39,800. That's a pretty scary hit for just one year.
Unless we're talking about something like a Wrangler or Toyota Pickup truck, a new car is going to depreciate a lot in the first year no matter what.

It's not as if buying another new sports sedan is really going magically to turn a new car into a good investment. If you're actually worried about depreciation, you shouldn't be buying new cars to begin with.

I put up with the costs of new cars because I want the intangible of values of having/enjoying a new car. It wouldn't be worth it for me to buy a new car I didn't want over another car I like better over a potential extra couple hundred bucks at trade in. Trade-in is BS metric anyway since that is just malleable as the price of the car itself.
 

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Trust me, I know a new car doesn't hold it's value long at all. Average depreciation is about 30-35% in the first year. For the Stinger to depreciate that fast in the first year is what got me concerned. At that rate, the trade-in value wouldn't be much more than a Mazda 6 after 3-4yrs time.
 
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