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Discussion Starter #1
Hi ,
I v tried to change my tires, however I ve noticed the piece behind the break discs of Right -Rear side -photo- kind of rust or is just coating, I m not sure ! Is someone have an idea? Can you help ?
238490
 
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That's just the dust cover or whatever it's called. Shouldn't be rusty, but that wont hurt anything.

Looks like you've been pretty hard on your brakes. Lol. Make sure you fully bleed the brakes at all 4 corners before putting the wheels back on. 2 man job.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks and can you please clarify what do you mean by “Make sure you fully bleed the brakes..”
and also I have just changed my break -including discs -just couple of months ,so it is look to me, you are seeing the break not in good shape do you recommend me to return back to the shop ? Your advice will be appreciated
 
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Thanks and can you please clarify what do you mean by “Make sure you fully bleed the brakes..”
and also I have just changed my break -including discs -just couple of months ,so it is look to me, you are seeing the break not in good shape do you recommend me to return back to the shop ? Your advice will be appreciated
Are the brakes in your picture new? They don't look new, but they do look OK to me.
 

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They look fine. The "dust shield" just keeps debris from getting hung up on the disc and damaging either the ABS tone ring wiring or the brake hose; it's rusty but in the rust belt that's not unusual at all. The pads and rotor both look nearly-new (those are the parts that do the actual braking) and ok.

If you haven't yet you do want to do a fluid change on 2 year intervals. Many people don't, but it's cheap (a can of fluid is $5), doesn't require a helper if you have a power bleeder and it takes less than 30 minutes. IMHO it's one of the cheapest PM items you can do on any vehicle and it prevents absorbed water (all brake fluid absorbs moisture from the air) in the fluid from corroding expensive things (like the ABS unit, for example.) Most German vehicles have it explicitly on their maintenance schedule while Japanese and American vehicles typically do not. Since I started doing it on ALL of my vehicles ~20 years ago I've yet to have to replace a caliper, master or ABS pump and I have two nearly-old-enough-to-drink vehicles here, so..... yeah, I'm gonna keep doing that.
 

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PM = Preventative Maintenance.

With the power bleeder it goes like this:

1. Put back of vehicle on stands or ramps (you need to be able to get to the bleeders.)

2. Remove cap on reservoir and then the screen, then suck out as much fluid as you can with an epoxy syringe or other similar implement (e.g. baster, etc.) Be careful not to get the fluid on the paint -- it will eat it! Replace screen.

3. Refill the reservoir with new fluid all the way to the FULL line or even a bit above it and attach the bleeder. Pressurize to 15 PSI.

4. Go to the right rear wheel, attach a clear hose to the top of the bleeder, put the hose in a bottle and crack the bleeder. Let it run until the fluid changes color; this is how you know you now have new fluid in there. Snug up the bleeder closed, remove the hose and put the cap back on. Note that the rears will flow SLOWLY as there is a proportioning valve in the line to the rears that restricts flow. THIS IS NOT TRUE FOR THE FRONTS; they will flow MUCH faster.

5. Go back, depressurize the unit, re-fill the master (DO NOT -- NOT -- NOT let it run completely empty or you will get air in the lines!) and then do the left rear. Repeat for right front and left front re-filling after EACH wheel and, if you have a MTX and the clutch is hydraulic (most modern vehicles are), the clutch slave. Note that the clutch bleeder is PLASTIC on virtually ALL cars; be VERY CAREFUL using tools on that one as it's really, really easy to break it and if you do you are now buying a clutch slave! Some MTX vehicles have a separate master and reservoir but most share the reservoir with the brakes.

6. After the last one is done refill the master to the proper level and put the cap back on. If your pads are NEW you should refill to just under the FULL mark. If your pads are approximately half worn or more then fill to about halfway between FULL and ADD. The reason not to fill to FULL if your pads have a good amount of wear on them is that if you forget to remove some fluid when you go to change the pads, and you filled it all the way, you'll overflow the master when you retract the piston and thus will make a mess. You're done.

Takes 30 minutes max. On MOST vehicles you can get to the fronts WITHOUT using ramps or a jack by turning the wheel hard to each side to expose the back of the caliper in the wheel well. The rears on nearly all trucks can be done without picking the vehicle up at all as there's usually plenty of clearance to crawl under but on most cars you have to either be a midget -- or use ramps or stands.

You can get a Motiv power bleeder with the correct cap (different vehicle makes use a different cap design) for about $50, or find someone who has one. You CAN put fluid in the bleeder which removes the need to keep adding it but I never do since you then have to deal with cleaning the bleeder out when you're done and making certain it is ABSOLUTELY clean and dry after each use. If you never put anything in there then you never have to worry about that.

If you've never cracked those bleeders for years (like since the car was new!) use some care and a SIX point socket (or closed end wrench) of the correct size on it to start with; if you have one break off on you then you're in a world of hurt but that will NOT be a factor if you do this every two years. When you have cause to actually REMOVE the bleeder screws (e.g. during brake servicing) lubricate the threads with a tiny bit of the silicone-based grease used on the caliper pins and they won't seize in the calipers. Note that the bleeders should have rubber dust caps over the tops; if one or more is missing gunk will go down the hole in the middle and can plug it or cause it to seize in the caliper and be real tough to break free in the future so if any are missing get some replacements; a pack of 10 on Spamazon is a couple bucks.
 

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If I may ask, what type do you use? I mean, I've seen a few types online so I would like to know what do you use.
The one I have is from Motive Products. It has an advantage in that the business end (the cap for your reservoir) is interchangeable. It's just an air tank with a hand pump, pressure gauge, hose and cap fitting that goes on the top of your master cylinder. ~$50 with the cap, and you can buy the other caps (they're interchangeable) if you have multiple makes of vehicles (I have GM, Mazda, VW and a Nissan here.)
 

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The one I have is from Motive Products. It has an advantage in that the business end (the cap for your reservoir) is interchangeable. It's just an air tank with a hand pump, pressure gauge, hose and cap fitting that goes on the top of your master cylinder. ~$50 with the cap, and you can buy the other caps (they're interchangeable) if you have multiple makes of vehicles (I have GM, Mazda, VW and a Nissan here.)
This is what I saw:


I'll look for something similar in our local place. Thanks.
 

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@Archerfish -- That's the wrong cap, but yes. If I recall correctly the current-generation "6"s use the "Ford" cap (Motive has an application chart, but I think that's the right one -- I'd have to go look at it.)
 
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